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CDL Practice Test: Transporting Cargo Safely

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CDL Practice Test: Transporting Cargo Safely

Transporting Cargo Safely Questions

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What is gross combination weight (GCW)?
  • Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
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What accurately defines the term "tire load"?
  • Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles
  • Light loads are often described as tire loads
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
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What is Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW)?
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
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What does it mean to block cargo?
  • Securing the front, back, or sides of a piece of cargo to keep it from sliding
  • Only loading one layer of product to avoid a rollover
  • Putting a divider between the trailer doors and the product to keep anyone from seeing what product is being hauled
  • Placing cargo in the center of the trailer for proper load balance
This is a question from page 35 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 53 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Blocking is used in the front, back and/or sides of a piece of cargo to keep it from sliding. Blocking is shaped to fit snugly against cargo. It is secured to the cargo deck to prevent cargo movement.

Bracing also is used to prevent movement of cargo. Bracing goes from the upper part of the cargo to the floor and/or walls of the cargo compartment.

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How many tiedowns should a 20-foot load have?
  • 1
  • 2
  • 4
  • 3
This is a question from page 35 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 53 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Cargo should have at least one tiedown for each 10 feet of cargo. Make sure you have enough tiedowns to meet this need. No matter how small the cargo is, it should have at least two tiedowns holding it.

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How often should you check your cargo to be sure it's properly secured?
  • Every 3 hours or 150 miles
  • Every 5 hours or 250 miles
  • Every 4 hours or 200 miles
  • Every 2 hours or 100 miles
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Check the cargo and securing devices as often as necessary during a trip to keep the load secure. A good habit is to inspect again:

  • After you have driven for 3 hours or 150 miles.
  • After every break you take during driving.
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Whether or not you load and secure cargo yourself, you are responsible for all except the following:
  • Knowing your cargo is properly secured
  • Inspecting your cargo
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight
  • Drivers are responsible for all of these
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Whether or not you load and secure the cargo yourself, you are responsible for:

  • Inspecting your cargo.
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight.
  • Knowing your cargo is properly secured.
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Which of the following statements about weight balance is TRUE:
  • All of these answers are true
  • Underloaded front axles can make the steering axle weight too light to steer safely
  • Too little weight on the driving axles can cause poor traction
  • Too much weight on the steering axle can cause "hard steering"
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Poor weight balance can make vehicle handling unsafe. Too much weight on the steering axle can cause hard steering and damage the steering axle and tires. Under loaded front axles (caused by shifting weight too far to the rear) can make the steering axle weight too light to steer safely. Too little weight on the driving axles can cause poor traction. The drive wheels may spin easily. During bad weather, the truck may not be able to keep going. Weight that is loaded so there is a high center of gravity causes greater chance of rollover. On flat bed vehicles, there is also a greater chance that the load will shift to the side or fall off.

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