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CDL Practice Test: Transporting Cargo Safely

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CDL Practice Test: Transporting Cargo Safely

Transporting Cargo Safely Questions

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Good Luck!

What is a situation where legal maximum weights may not be safe?
  • Driving in poor weather conditions
  • Unique roadway conditions such as driving on gravel or sand
  • Driving through mountains
  • All of these are situations where legal maximum weights may not be safe
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

During bad weather, in mountains, or unique roadway conditions such as driving on gravel or sand may not be safe to operate at legal maximum weights. Take this into account before driving.

Next
Whether or not you load and secure cargo yourself, you are responsible for all except the following:
  • Inspecting your cargo
  • Drivers are responsible for all of these
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight
  • Knowing your cargo is properly secured
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Whether or not you load and secure the cargo yourself, you are responsible for:

  • Inspecting your cargo.
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight.
  • Knowing your cargo is properly secured.
Prev
Next
What is Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW)?
  • Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
Prev
Next
What is gross combination weight (GCW)?
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
Prev
Next
A truck with a higher center of gravity is:
  • More likely to tip over during a turn
  • More likely to gain traction in a snowstorm
  • Less difficult to maneuver when swerving around an obstruction
  • Less likely to tip over during a turn
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Do Not Be Top-Heavy - The height of the vehicle's center of gravity is very important for safe handling. A high center of gravity (cargo piled up high or heavy cargo on top) means you are more likely to tip over. It is most dangerous in curves or if you have to swerve to avoid a hazard. It is very important to distribute the cargo so it is as low as possible. Put the heaviest parts of the cargo under the lightest parts.

Prev
Next
Drivers are responsible for the following, except:
  • Knowing cargo is properly secured
  • Inspecting the cargo
  • Knowing the exact product count inside the trailer
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Whether or not you load and secure the cargo yourself, you are responsible for:

  • Inspecting your cargo.
  • Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight.
  • Knowing your cargo is properly secured.
Prev
Next
What can happen if you don't have enough weight on the front axle?
  • It can decrease stopping distance
  • It can make the steering axle weight too light to steer safely
  • It can cause steering to become more sensitive to inputs
  • It can create unsafe traction on the drive tires
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Underloaded front axles (caused by shifting weight too far to the rear) can make the steering axle weight too light to steer safely.

Prev
Next
What accurately defines the term "tire load"?
  • Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure
  • Light loads are often described as tire loads
  • Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load
  • Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles
This is a question from page 34 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 52 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You are responsible for not being overloaded. Following are definitions of weights:

  • Gross vehicle weight (GVW): Total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
  • Gross combination weight (GCW): Total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
  • Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): Maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
  • Axle weight: Weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
  • Tire load: Maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
  • Suspension systems: Suspension systems have a manufacturer's weight capacity rating.
  • Coupling device capacity: Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
Prev
Finish
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