CDL Practice Tests For Hazardous Materials Page 9

Hazardous Materials Practice Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

When loading or unloading explosives, your engine should be:
  • Turned off or on, it doesn't matter
  • Warmed up
  • Turned on
  • Turned off
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Precautions for Specific Hazards — Explosives:

Turn off your engine before loading or unloading any explosives. Then check the cargo space.

Next
When loading or unloading explosives, which of the following is true of the cargo space itself?
  • Make sure that there are no sharp points
  • Disable cargo heaters, and drain heater fuel tanks
  • All of these are points of a proper cargo space inspection
  • Be sure there are no broken side or floor boards
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Precautions for Specific Hazards —

Class 1 (Explosives) Materials: Turn your engine off before loading or unloading any explosives. Then check the cargo space. You must:

  • Disable cargo heaters. Disconnect heater power sources and drain heater fuel tanks.
  • Make sure there are no sharp points that might damage cargo. Look for bolts, screws, nails, broken side panels and broken floorboards.
  • Use a floor lining with Division 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3. The floors must be tight and the liner must be either non-metallic material or non-ferrous metal.
Prev
Next
In vehicles transporting Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 materials, the portion of the interior in contact with the load must be lined with:
  • Aluminum alloy on wood
  • Fur or leather
  • Gold leaf
  • Non-metallic material on non-ferrous metals
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Precautions for Specific Hazards — Explosives:

Turn off your engine before loading or unloading any explosives. Then check the cargo space.

  • Disable cargo heaters. Disconnect heater power sources and drain heater fuel tanks.
  • Make sure there are no sharp points that might damage cargo. Look for bolts, screws, nails, broken side panels and broken floor boards.
  • Vehicles transporting Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 (explosive) materials must have tight floors with that portion of the interior in contact with the load lined with non-metallic material on non-ferrous metals.
Prev
Next
When loading, unloading, or moving explosives, when is it ok to use a metal hook?
  • Anytime
  • Never
  • When it will speed up the process significantly
  • Only on Division 1.2 materials
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Use extra care to protect explosives. Never use hooks or other metal tools. Never drop, throw or roll packages. Protect explosive packages from other cargo that might cause damage.

Prev
Next
When transporting damaged packages of explosives, you should:
  • Load them on the back
  • You should never transport damaged packages of explosives
  • Wrap them in heavy plastic
  • Keep them separated from the rest of the load
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Never transport damaged packages of explosives. Do not take a package that shows any dampness or oily stain.

Prev
Next
Division 1.1 or 1.2 cannot be loaded or transported in which of the following cases?
  • All of these prohibit transportation of explosives
  • One of the vehicles is "Initiating Explosives"
  • One of the vehicles in the combo is a placarded tank
  • The other trailer contains Class 7 radioactive materials labeled "Yellow III"
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Do not transport Division 1.1 or 1.2 in vehicle combinations if:

There is a marked or placarded cargo tank in the combination.

The other vehicle in the combination contains:

Division 1.1 A (Initiating Explosives).

Packages of Class 7 (Radioactive) materials labeled "Yellow III."

Division 2.3 (Poisonous Gas) or Division 6.1 (Poisonous) materials.

Hazardous materials in a portable tank, on a DOT Spec 106A or 110A tank.

Prev
Next
All of the following are acceptable methods of transporting Class 2 hazmat except:
  • In boxes that won't turn over
  • Braced laying down flat or held upright
  • Leaning against the wall at a 45 degree angle
  • In racks attached to the vehicle
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Class 2 (compressed gases) including cryogenic liquids –

If your vehicle does not have racks to hold cylinders, the cargo space floor must be flat. The cylinders must be:

  • Held upright or braced lying down flat, or
  • In racks attached to the vehicle, or
  • In boxes that will keep them from turning over.
Prev
Next
Transporting poisons or inhalation hazards in the cab or sleeping berth is acceptable when?
  • There is no more space in the trailer
  • The trip is under 250 miles
  • Never
  • The rest of the cargo is food-grade material
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) or Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials –

Never transport these materials in containers with interconnections. Never load a package labeled POISON, POISON-INHALATION HAZARD or POISON GAS in the driver’s cab or sleeper berth. Except for poison materials (6.1) marked or labeled as PGIII, never transport a package labeled POISON or POISON INHALATION HAZARD with foodstuffs or edible materials for human or animal consumption.

Prev
Next
The degree of control needed when transporting radioactive materials is called the:
  • Transport degree
  • Radioactive index
  • Transport index
  • Transport risk
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Class 7 (radioactive) materials –

Some packages of Class 7 (radioactive) materials bear a number called the “transport index.” The shipper labels these packages Radioactive II or Radioactive III, and prints the package’s transport index on the label. Radiation surrounds each package, passing through all nearby packages.

To deal with this problem, the number of packages you can load together is controlled. Their closeness to people, animals and unexposed film also is controlled. The transport index tells the degree of control needed during transportation. The total transport index of all packages in a single vehicle must not exceed 50 (see Figure 9.7 on page 98).

Prev
Next
The total transport index on a single vehicle cannot be more than:
  • 50
  • 98
  • 80
  • 40
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Class 7 (radioactive) materials –

Some packages of Class 7 (radioactive) materials bear a number called the “transport index.” The shipper labels these packages Radioactive II or Radioactive III, and prints the package’s transport index on the label. Radiation surrounds each package, passing through all nearby packages.

To deal with this problem, the number of packages you can load together is controlled. Their closeness to people, animals and unexposed film also is controlled. The transport index tells the degree of control needed during transportation. The total transport index of all packages in a single vehicle must not exceed 50 (see Figure 9.7 on page 98).

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[4,3,4,2,2,1,3,3,3,1]
10

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More