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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

Safe Driving Questions

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Good Luck!

All of the following are key steering system parts except:
  • Air compressor
  • Pumps
  • Gear box
  • Tie rods
This is a question from page 7 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 14 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Things to check in the steering system:

  • Missing nuts, bolts, cotter keys or other parts.
  • Bent, loose or broken parts, such as steering column, steering gear box or tie rods.
  • If power steering equipped-check hoses, pumps and fluid level for leaks.
  • Steering wheel play of more than 10 degrees (approximately 2 inches movement at the rim of a 20-inch steering wheel) can make it hard to steer.
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At what distance should you dim your high-beam headlights for oncoming traffic?
  • Within 500 feet
  • Within 1,000 feet
  • Within 750 feet
  • Within 250 feet
This is a question from page 23 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 35 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Glare from your headlights can cause problems for drivers coming toward you. Headlights also can bother drivers going in the same direction as you, when your lights shine in their rearview mirrors. Dim your lights before they cause glare for other drivers. Dim your lights within 500 feet of an oncoming vehicle and when following another vehicle within 500 feet.

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At 55mph on dry pavement with good brakes, it can take a heavy vehicle about how many feet to stop once the brakes are applied?
  • About 200 feet
  • About 165 feet
  • About 150 feet
  • About 216 feet
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

At 55 mph on dry pavement with good brakes, it can take a heavy vehicle about 216 feet to stop.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Make sure you memorize the definition of Braking Distance as well as the time and distance it takes for a vehicle to stop once the brakes are fully applied.

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When should high-beam headlights be used?
  • During the daytime to help others see you
  • When driving through heavily traveled city streets
  • All of these are good times to use high-beam headlights
  • Anytime it's safe and you're legally allowed to do so
This is a question from page 20 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 30 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Use high-beams: Some drivers make the mistake of always using low-beams. This seriously cuts down on their ability to see ahead. Use high-beams when it is safe and legal to do so. Use them when you are not within 500 feet of an approaching vehicle.
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In a commercial vehicle suspension system, how many leaf springs may be missing?
  • None can be missing
  • No more than 1/2 of the leaf springs can be missing
  • No more than 1/4 of the leaf springs can be missing
  • No more than 1 leaf spring can be missing
This is a question from page 8 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 14 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Suspension systems: The suspension system holds up the vehicle and its load and keeps the axles in place. Therefore, broken suspension parts can be extremely dangerous. Look for the following:

  • Spring hangers that allow movement of axle from proper position.
  • Cracked or broken spring hangers.
  • Missing or broken leaves in any leaf spring. If 1/4 or more are missing, it will put the vehicle "out of service," but any defect can be dangerous.
  • Broken leaves in a multi-leaf spring, or leaves that have shifted so they might hit a tire or other part.
  • Leaking shock absorbers.
  • Torque rod or arm, U-bolts, spring hangers, or other axle positioning parts that are cracked, damaged or missing.
  • Air suspension systems that are damaged and/or leaking.
  • Any loose, cracked, broken or missing frame members.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to memorize that 1/4 or more leaf springs missing is unacceptable and will put the vehicle out of service. This may be included on the written exam and will need to be memorized for the pre-trip exam.

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Which statement is true regarding low bridges:
  • Road repaving or packed snow may reduce the clearance of the bridge since the sign was posted
  • If you were able to clear a low bridge with a loaded trailer, you will be able to clear it with an empty trailer as well
  • Some road surfaces can cause a vehicle to tilt, but warning signs always account for that
  • Bridge clearance signs always account for 3 inches of packed snow
This is a question from page 22 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 32 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hitting overhead objects is a danger. Make sure you always have overhead clearance.

Do not assume that the weights and heights posted at bridges and overpasses are correct. Repaving or packed snow may have reduced the clearances since the heights were posted.

The weight of a cargo van changes its height. An empty van is higher than a loaded one. That you got under a bridge when you were loaded does not mean that you can do it when you are empty.

If you doubt you have safe space to pass under an object, go slowly. If you are not sure you can make it, take another route. Warnings are often posted on low bridges or underpasses, but sometimes they are not.

Some roads can cause a vehicle to tilt. There can be a problem clearing objects along the edge of the road, such as signs or trees or bridge supports. Where this is a problem, drive a little closer to the center of the road.

Before you back into an area, get out and check for over-hanging objects, such as trees, branches or electrical wires. It is easy to miss seeing them while you are backing. (Also check for other hazards at the same time.)

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What is the minimum amount of material required on brake shoes or pads?
  • 1/16-inch
  • 1/4-inch
  • 1/2-inch
  • 1/8-inch
This is a question from page 7 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 14 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Things to check for on brake drums or shoes:

  • Cracked drums.
  • Shoes or pads with oil, grease or brake fluid on them (brake pad more than 1/4-inch thick).
  • Shoes worn dangerously thin, missing or broken.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This needs to be memorized, not only for the written exam but also for the pre-trip exam.

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To determine your safe following distance, you should do all of the following except:
  • Wait until the rear of the vehicle ahead passes a shadow on the road, a pavement marking, or some other clear landmark, then count off the seconds until the front of your vehicle crosses the same fixed location
  • Compare your following distance count with the rule of 1 second for every 10 feet of length
  • If you're too close, drop back a little and recount until you have at least 1 second of spacing for every 10 feet of vehicle length (add 1 second if driving over 40mph)
  • Check the following distance of vehicles around you and match what they are doing to keep uniformity in the driving pattern
This is a question from page 21 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 31 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To know how much space you have, wait until the vehicle ahead passes a shadow on the road, a pavement marking, or some other clear landmark. Then count off the seconds like this: "one thousand-and-one, one thousand-and-two" and so on, until you reach the same spot.

Compare your count with the rule of 1 second for every 10 feet of length. If you are driving a 40-foot truck and only counted up to 2 seconds, you are too close. Drop back a little and count again until you have 4 seconds of following distance (or 5 seconds, if you are going over 40 mph).

After a little practice, you will know how far back you should be. Remember to add 1 second for speeds above 40 mph. Also remember that when the road is slippery, you need much more space to stop.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Make sure you memorize the following distance formula of 1 second of following distance for every 10ft of vehicle length (adding 1 second for speeds exceeding 40mph).

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