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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

Safe Driving Questions

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Good Luck!

When putting out reflective triangles after parking on the side of the road, you should:
  • Hold them at your sides
  • Carry them under your arm
  • Hold them between yourself and the oncoming traffic
  • Hold them behind you
This is a question from page 18 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 27 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

When putting out the triangles, hold them between yourself and the oncoming traffic for your own safety (so other drivers can see you).

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What three things add up to stopping distance?
  • Reaction Distance, Skid Distance, and Friction Distance
  • Perception Distance, Braking Distance, Pressure Distance
  • Braking Distance, Forward Momentum Distance, and Friction Resistance
  • Perception Distance, Reaction Distance, and Braking Distance
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Three things add up to total stopping distance:

Perception Distance
+ Reaction Distance
+ Braking Distance
---------------------------------
= Total Stopping Distance

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This formula will almost definitely show up on your written exam so it's extremely important to not only memorize the formula, but memorize what each definition means:

  • Perception distance is the distance your vehicle travels from the time your eyes see a hazard until your brain recognizes it. The perception time for an alert driver is about 3/4 second. At 55 mph, you travel 60 feet in 3/4 second.
  • Reaction distance is the distance traveled from the time your brain tells your foot to move from the accelerator until your foot is actually pushing the brake pedal. The average driver has a reaction time of 3/4 second. This accounts for an additional 60 feet traveled at 55 mph.
  • Braking Distance is the distance it takes to stop once the brakes are applied. At 55 mph on dry pavement with good brakes, it can take a heavy vehicle about 170 feet and about 4 1/2 seconds to stop.
  • Total stopping distance - At 55 mph it will take about 6 seconds to stop and your vehicle will travel the distance of a football field (60 + 60 + 170 = 290 feet).
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If you experience a cargo fire, you should:
  • Keep the trailer doors closed
  • Continue driving in order to "blow out" the flames
  • All of these options should be considered when experiencing a cargo fire
  • Open the trailer doors
This is a question from page 31 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 46 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

For a cargo fire in a van or box trailer, keep the doors shut, especially if your cargo contains hazardous materials. Opening the van doors will supply the fire with oxygen and can cause it to burn very fast.

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What statement is true about speed limit signs on offramps and onramps?
  • These are not safe speeds for large or heavy vehicles
  • The speeds are designed to be safe for large trucks
  • The signs are generally posted at 10mph under the actual safe speed
  • The speeds are safe for empty trucks
This is a question from page 27 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 40 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Offramps/onramps: Freeway and turnpike exits can be particularly dangerous for commercial vehicles. Offramps and onramps often have speed limit signs posted. Remember, these speeds may be safe for automobiles but may not be safe for larger vehicles or heavily loaded vehicles. Exits that go downhill and turn at the same time can be especially dangerous. The downgrade makes it difficult to reduce speed. Braking and turning at the same time can be a dangerous practice. Make sure you are going slow enough before you get on the curved part of an offramp or onramp.

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Why is it important to perform a daily vehicle inspection?
  • Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles
  • A proper inspection could avoid a breakdown
  • All of these are important reasons for doing a daily vehicle inspection
  • Finding defects could prevent an accident due to faulty equipment
This is a question from page 7 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 13 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The most important aspect of traffic safety for yourself and others who share the road with you is that you personally inspect your vehicle. A vehicle defect found during an inspection could save you problems later. You could have a breakdown on the road that will cost you time and money, or even worse, an accident caused by the defect.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it "out of service" until it is repaired.

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When you double your speed, how much will you increase your distance to stop?
  • About five times as much distance is needed to stop
  • About one and a half times as much distance is needed to stop
  • About twice as much distance is needed to stop
  • About four times as much distance is needed to stop
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Whenever you double your speed, it takes about four times as much distance to stop, and your vehicle will have four times the destructive power if it crashes. High speeds increase stopping distances greatly. By slowing down a little, you can gain a lot in reduced braking distance.

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The following are all causes of Front-Wheel Skids except:
  • All of these are reasons for front-wheel skids
  • Driving too fast for conditions
  • Cargo loaded so not enough weight is on the front axle
  • Too much tread on the front tires
This is a question from page 30 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 44 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Front-Wheel Skids - Most front-wheel skids are caused by driving too fast for conditions. Other causes are lack of tread on the front tires, and cargo loaded so not enough weight is on the front axle. In a front-wheel skid, the front end tends to go in a straight line regardless of how much you turn the steering wheel. On a very slippery surface, you may not be able to steer around a curve or turn.

When a front-wheel skid occurs, the only way to stop the skid is to let the vehicle slow down. Stop turning and/or braking so hard. Slow down as quickly as possible without skidding.

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Who is responsible for performing a daily vehicle inspection?
  • The driver is always responsible for completing their own daily inspections
  • While it's important to perform daily vehicle inspections, there are no federal regulations requiring inspections be done on each day the vehicle is driven
  • A certified mechanic may do the vehicle inspection instead of the driver
  • Any CDL holder can deem a vehicle safe to operate as long as they sign off on the daily inspection report
This is a question from page 7 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 13 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The most important aspect of traffic safety for yourself and others who share the road with you is that you personally inspect your vehicle. A vehicle defect found during an inspection could save you problems later. You could have a breakdown on the road that will cost you time and money, or even worse, an accident caused by the defect.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it "out of service" until it is repaired.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

A daily vehicle inspection is crucially important. Many drivers will forgo an inspection if they are pressed for time, but this is extremely dangerous. You are not safe to drive until you've done an inspection of your vehicle.

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