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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

Safe Driving Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

To determine your safe following distance, you should do all of the following except:
  • Check the following distance of vehicles around you and match what they are doing to keep uniformity in the driving pattern
  • Wait until the rear of the vehicle ahead passes a shadow on the road, a pavement marking, or some other clear landmark, then count off the seconds until the front of your vehicle crosses the same fixed location
  • If you're too close, drop back a little and recount until you have at least 1 second of spacing for every 10 feet of vehicle length (add 1 second if driving over 40mph)
  • Compare your following distance count with the rule of 1 second for every 10 feet of length
This is a question from page 21 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 31 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To know how much space you have, wait until the vehicle ahead passes a shadow on the road, a pavement marking, or some other clear landmark. Then count off the seconds like this: "one thousand-and-one, one thousand-and-two" and so on, until you reach the same spot.

Compare your count with the rule of 1 second for every 10 feet of length. If you are driving a 40-foot truck and only counted up to 2 seconds, you are too close. Drop back a little and count again until you have 4 seconds of following distance (or 5 seconds, if you are going over 40 mph).

After a little practice, you will know how far back you should be. Remember to add 1 second for speeds above 40 mph. Also remember that when the road is slippery, you need much more space to stop.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Make sure you memorize the following distance formula of 1 second of following distance for every 10ft of vehicle length (adding 1 second for speeds exceeding 40mph).

Next
When at the scene of an accident with injuries, when should you assist the injured?
  • Assist the injured only after you have protected the area and notified authorities
  • You should never assist the injured until authorities have arrived
  • Assist the injured immediately
  • Assist the injured after you have protected the area, but before you have notified authorities
This is a question from page 30 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 45 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If a qualified person is at the accident and helping the injured, stay out of the way unless asked to assist. Otherwise, do the best you can to help any injured parties:

  • Do not move a severely injured person unless the danger of fire or passing traffic makes it necessary.
  • Stop heavy bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound.
  • Keep the injured person warm.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you are the first one on the scene of a serious accident, you may want to help the injured right away. But make sure you secure the scene of the accident first to avoid any additional collisions. You should then notify the authorities before attempting to assist an injured person. Make sure you memorize the order of recommended accident procedures:

1. Protect the area
2. Notify authorities
3. Assist the injured

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Next
Which statement is false?
  • A heavily loaded truck will take longer to stop than an empty truck.
  • The brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded.
  • The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb
  • Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb. But the brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded. Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction. It can bounce and lock up its wheels, giving much poorer braking. (This is not usually the case with buses.)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This type of question is frequently asked on written exams. Understand that truck braking systems are designed for when the truck is fully loaded. An empty or very light truck will actually take longer to stop than a fully loaded and heavy truck.

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Next
How much space should you keep in front of you while driving?
  • At least 2 seconds for each 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 50 mph. At speeds above 50, add an additional 2 seconds
  • At least 1 second for each 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 40 mph. At speeds above 40, add an additional 1 second
  • At least 1 second for each 20 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 40mph. At speeds above 40, add an additional 1 second
  • At least 2 seconds for each 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 40mph. At speeds above 40, add an additional 3 seconds
This is a question from page 21 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 31 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

One good rule for how much space you should keep in front of you is at least 1 second for each 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 40 mph. At greater speeds, you must add 1 second for safety. For example, if you are driving a 40-foot vehicle, you should leave 4 seconds between you and the vehicle ahead. In a 60-foot rig, you will need 6 seconds. Over 40 mph, you would need 5 seconds for a 40-foot vehicle and 7 seconds for a 60-foot vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Knowing how to calculate proper following distance is very important and will likely show up on your written exam. Please go over this section thoroughly in your CDL manual and be sure you fully understand how to calculate safe following distance.

Prev
Next
As you approach a vehicle to perform an inspection, you should look for:
  • Hazards to vehicle movement (people, other vehicles, objects, low hanging wires, limbs, etc.)
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Vehicle damage or leaning to one side
  • Fresh oil, coolant, grease or fuel leaks
This is a question from page 9 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 16 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Approaching the vehicle: Notice its general condition. Look for damage or vehicle leaning to one side. Look under the vehicle for fresh oil, coolant, grease or fuel leaks. Check the area around the vehicle for hazards to vehicle movement (people, other vehicles, objects, low hanging wires, limbs, etc.).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Sometimes, being close up to a vehicle can force you to miss some obvious hazards. Take a moment to get the "full picture" when walking up to your vehicle.

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Next
What three things add up to stopping distance?
  • Braking Distance, Forward Momentum Distance, and Friction Resistance
  • Reaction Distance, Skid Distance, and Friction Distance
  • Perception Distance, Reaction Distance, and Braking Distance
  • Perception Distance, Braking Distance, Pressure Distance
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Three things add up to total stopping distance:

Perception Distance
+ Reaction Distance
+ Braking Distance
---------------------------------
= Total Stopping Distance

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This formula will almost definitely show up on your written exam so it's extremely important to not only memorize the formula, but memorize what each definition means:

  • Perception distance is the distance your vehicle travels from the time your eyes see a hazard until your brain recognizes it. The perception time for an alert driver is about 3/4 second. At 55 mph, you travel 60 feet in 3/4 second.
  • Reaction distance is the distance traveled from the time your brain tells your foot to move from the accelerator until your foot is actually pushing the brake pedal. The average driver has a reaction time of 3/4 second. This accounts for an additional 60 feet traveled at 55 mph.
  • Braking Distance is the distance it takes to stop once the brakes are applied. At 55 mph on dry pavement with good brakes, it can take a heavy vehicle about 170 feet and about 4 1/2 seconds to stop.
  • Total stopping distance - At 55 mph it will take about 6 seconds to stop and your vehicle will travel the distance of a football field (60 + 60 + 170 = 290 feet).
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Next
If the roadway surface is icy, how much should you reduce your speed?
  • Reduce speed by 1/2
  • Maintain current speed in order to avoid a rear-end collision
  • Reduce speed to a crawl and stop driving as soon as you can safely do so
  • During icy conditions, stop immediately to avoid loss of control
This is a question from page 20 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If the surface is icy, reduce speed to a crawl and stop driving as soon as you can safely do so.

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Next
Which statement is true regarding low bridges:
  • Bridge clearance signs always account for 3 inches of packed snow
  • Some road surfaces can cause a vehicle to tilt, but warning signs always account for that
  • Road repaving or packed snow may reduce the clearance of the bridge since the sign was posted
  • If you were able to clear a low bridge with a loaded trailer, you will be able to clear it with an empty trailer as well
This is a question from page 22 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 32 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hitting overhead objects is a danger. Make sure you always have overhead clearance.

Do not assume that the weights and heights posted at bridges and overpasses are correct. Repaving or packed snow may have reduced the clearances since the heights were posted.

The weight of a cargo van changes its height. An empty van is higher than a loaded one. That you got under a bridge when you were loaded does not mean that you can do it when you are empty.

If you doubt you have safe space to pass under an object, go slowly. If you are not sure you can make it, take another route. Warnings are often posted on low bridges or underpasses, but sometimes they are not.

Some roads can cause a vehicle to tilt. There can be a problem clearing objects along the edge of the road, such as signs or trees or bridge supports. Where this is a problem, drive a little closer to the center of the road.

Before you back into an area, get out and check for over-hanging objects, such as trees, branches or electrical wires. It is easy to miss seeing them while you are backing. (Also check for other hazards at the same time.)

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