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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

Safe Driving Questions

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Good Luck!

The following factors should be considered when determining your proper downgrade speed except:
  • Speed of vehicles around you
  • Weather and road conditions
  • Length and steepness of the grade
  • Total weight of the vehicle and cargo
This is a question from page 20 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 30 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Speed on Downgrades - Your vehicle's speed will increase on downgrades because of gravity. Your most important objective is to select and maintain a speed that is not fast for the:

  • Total weight of the vehicle and cargo.
  • Length of the grade.
  • Steepness of the grade.
  • Road conditions.
  • Weather.

If a speed limit is posted, or there is a sign indicating "Maximum Safe Speed," never exceed the speed shown. Also, look for and heed warning signs indicating the length and steepness of the grade. You must use the braking effect of the engine as the principal way of controlling your speed on downgrades. The braking effect of the engine is greatest when it is near the governed RPMs and the transmission is in the lower gears. Save your brakes so you will be able to slow or stop as required by road and traffic conditions. Shift your transmission to a low gear before starting down the grade and use the proper braking techniques.

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Which of the following constitutes one alcoholic "drink"?
  • 5-oz. glass of 12% wine
  • 1 1/2-oz. shot of 80-proof liquor
  • All of these are correct
  • 12-oz. glass of 5% beer
This is a question from page 32 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 48 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

A "drink" refers to the alcohol in a drink that affects human performance. It does not make any difference whether the alcohol comes from a couple of beers or two glasses of wine or two shots of hard liquor. All the following drinks contain the same amount of alcohol:

- 12-oz. glass of 5% beer
- 5-oz. glass of 12% wine
- 1 1/2-oz. shot of 80-proof liquor

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If you experience a cargo fire, you should:
  • Continue driving in order to "blow out" the flames
  • Keep the trailer doors closed
  • All of these options should be considered when experiencing a cargo fire
  • Open the trailer doors
This is a question from page 31 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 46 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

For a cargo fire in a van or box trailer, keep the doors shut, especially if your cargo contains hazardous materials. Opening the van doors will supply the fire with oxygen and can cause it to burn very fast.

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The average driver has a reaction time of:
  • 1-2 seconds
  • 3/4 second to 1 second
  • 1/8 second
  • 2 seconds
This is a question from page 19 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 29 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The average driver has a reaction time of second to 1 second. At 55 mph this accounts for 61 feet traveled.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to have reaction time and distance memorized. This will likely show up on your written exam.

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How many seconds ahead should you look while driving?
  • 3 to 6 seconds
  • At least 35 seconds
  • 25 to 30 seconds
  • 12 to 15 seconds
This is a question from page 17 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 26 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Most good drivers look 12-15 seconds ahead. That means looking ahead the distance you will travel in 12-15 seconds. At lower speeds, that's about one block. At highway speeds it's about one-quarter of a mile. If you are not looking that far ahead, you may have to stop too quickly or make quick lane changes. Looking 12 - 15 seconds ahead does not mean not paying attention to things that are closer. Good drivers shift their attention back and forth, near and far.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

It's important to memorize this. Be sure you understand that 12 to 15 seconds ahead means about one block at lower speeds and about 1/4 mile at highway speeds. You're likely to have a question about this on your written exam.

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When should high-beam headlights be used?
  • During the daytime to help others see you
  • All of these are good times to use high-beam headlights
  • Anytime it's safe and you're legally allowed to do so
  • When driving through heavily traveled city streets
This is a question from page 20 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 30 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Use high-beams: Some drivers make the mistake of always using low-beams. This seriously cuts down on their ability to see ahead. Use high-beams when it is safe and legal to do so. Use them when you are not within 500 feet of an approaching vehicle.
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What is a good way to determine which gear you should be in for a downhill grade?
  • Drivers should wait until they are about 1/4 of the way down the hill before deciding which gear to use
  • Downhill grades should always use 5th gear or lower
  • Use the same gear or higher gears than what was needed for the uphill grade
  • Use the same gear or lower gears than what was needed for the uphill grade
This is a question from page 26 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 39 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Be in Right Gear Before Starting Down Grade - Shift the transmission to a low gear before starting down the grade. Do not try to downshift after your speed has already built up. You will not be able to shift into a lower gear. You may not even be able to get back into any gear and all engine braking effect will be lost. Forcing an automatic transmission into a lower gear at high speed could damage the transmission and also lead to loss of all engine braking effect.

A good rule for older trucks is to use the same gear going down a hill that you would need to climb the hill. However, newer trucks have low-friction parts and streamlined shapes for fuel economy. They also may have more powerful engines. This means they can go up hills in higher gears and have less friction and air drag to hold them back going down hills. For that reason, drivers of modern trucks may have to use lower gears going down a hill than would be required to go up the hill. Know what is right for your vehicle.

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Before entering a curve, you should do all of the following except:
  • Slow down to a safe speed before entering the curve
  • Brake hardest during the middle of the curve
  • Remain in gear during the curve
  • Downshift to the right gear before entering the curve
This is a question from page 16 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 25 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Before entering a curve – Slow down to a safe speed, and downshift to the right gear before entering the curve. This lets you use some power through the curve to help the vehicle be more stable while turning. It also lets you speed up as soon as you are out of the curve.

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