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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

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CDL Practice Test: Safe Driving

Safe Driving Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

Which of the following is not an item you check on the suspension?
  • U-Bolts
  • Spring hangers
  • Shackles
  • Holdbacks
This is a question from page 12 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 21 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Suspension:

- Condition of spring(s), spring hangers, shackles and U-bolts.
- Axle secure.
- Powered axle(s) not leaking lube (gear oil).
- Condition of torque rod arms, bushings.
- Condition of shock absorber(s).
- If retractable axle-equipped, check condition of lift mechanism; if air-powered, check for leaks.

Next
When experiencing rapid tire failure, such as a blowout, you should do all of the following except:
  • Hold the steering wheel very firmly until you come to a complete stop
  • Stay off the brake and slow down very gradually
  • Use the "stab braking" method
  • Once stopped, visually check all tires as well as any damage flying tire debris may have cause to your vehicle
This is a question from page 29 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 44 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hold the steering wheel firmly - If a front tire fails, it can twist the steering wheel out of your hand. The only way to prevent this is to keep a firm grip on the steering wheel with both hands at all times.

  • Stay off the brake - It is natural to want to brake in an emergency. However, braking when a tire has failed could cause loss of control. Unless you are about to run into something, stay off the brake until the vehicle has slowed down. Then brake very gently, pull off the road and stop.
  • Check the tires - After you have come to a stop, get out and check all the tires. Do this even if the vehicle seems to be handling all right. If one of your dual tires goes, the only way you may know it is by getting out and looking at the tires.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Having a tire blowout is very likely to occur during your driving career. When a blowout occurs, it's important to stay calm. Most accidents from tire blowouts occur due to drivers becoming spooked and overreacting. Stay calm and don't make any sudden or erratic movements. After the initial blowout, do not use your brakes. Allow the vehicle to slow down very gradually and once you're sure you have full control of the vehicle, start using gentle brake pressure and find a safe location to pull over.

Never go into the roadway to remove tire debris. If the debris is causing a traffic hazard, notify authorities about the situation and warn other truckers by using a CB Radio, if equipped..

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Next
During very hot weather, how often should you inspect your tires?
  • Every 4 hours or 200 miles
  • Every 2 hours or 100 miles
  • Every 3 hours or 150 miles
  • Ever hour or 50 miles
This is a question from page 25 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 37 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Check the tire mounting and air pressure. Inspect the tires every two hours or every 100 miles when driving in very hot weather. Air pressure increases with temperature. Do not let air out or the pressure will be too low when the tires cool off. If a tire is too hot to touch, remain stopped until the tire cools off. Otherwise the tire may blow out or catch fire. A burning tire should be cooled with water.

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Next
What can you do to help prevent a truck fire when you stop in the middle of a trip?
  • Feel the exhaust stack to make sure it's not excessively hot
  • Check the tires, wheels and truck body for signs of heat whenever you stop during a trip
  • Uncouple the emergency brake line to see how hot the air is
  • Open the hood and take a temperature reading of the engine coolant to be sure it's within manufacture specifications
This is a question from page 31 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 46 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Enroute inspection: Check the tires, wheels and truck body for signs of heat whenever you stop during a trip.

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Next
What is brake fade?
  • When brakes heat up, you have to apply them harder and harder to get the same stopping power
  • The natural wear and tear on brake pads
  • When brakes on one side of the vehicle wear faster than brakes on the other side of the vehicle
  • As brakes cool down, you have to apply them harder and harder to get the same stopping power
This is a question from page 26 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 39 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If the brakes become too hot, they may start to "fade." This means you have to apply them harder and harder to get the same stopping power. If you continue to use the brakes hard, they can keep fading until you cannot slow down or stop at all.

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Next
Which of the following forms of driving communication should be used with caution so as not to startle another driver?
  • Using turn signals
  • Honking a horn
  • Flashing lights
  • Using emergency flashers
This is a question from page 18 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 27 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Use your horn only when needed - Your horn can let others know you are there and help to avoid a crash. Use your horn when needed; however, it can startle others and could be dangerous when used unnecessarily.

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Next
As you approach a vehicle to perform an inspection, you should look for:
  • Fresh oil, coolant, grease or fuel leaks
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Vehicle damage or leaning to one side
  • Hazards to vehicle movement (people, other vehicles, objects, low hanging wires, limbs, etc.)
This is a question from page 9 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 16 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Approaching the vehicle: Notice its general condition. Look for damage or vehicle leaning to one side. Look under the vehicle for fresh oil, coolant, grease or fuel leaks. Check the area around the vehicle for hazards to vehicle movement (people, other vehicles, objects, low hanging wires, limbs, etc.).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Sometimes, being close up to a vehicle can force you to miss some obvious hazards. Take a moment to get the "full picture" when walking up to your vehicle.

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Next
What is the most important space around your vehicle?
  • The area ahead of your vehicle
  • The sides of your vehicle
  • All spaces around your vehicle are equally as important
  • The rear of your vehicle
This is a question from page 21 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 31 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Of all the space around your vehicle, it is the area ahead of the vehicle—the space you are driving into—that is most important. You need space ahead in case you must suddenly stop. According to accident reports, the vehicle that trucks and buses most often run into is the one in front of them. The most frequent cause is following too closely. Remember, if the vehicle ahead of you is smaller than yours, it can probably stop faster than you can. You may crash if you are following too closely.

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[4,3,2,2,1,2,2,1]
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