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Safe Driving Free CDL Practice Tests
Page 3

Prepare For The Safe Driving Portion Of Your CDL Written Exams

Safe Driving Questions

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Good Luck!

When starting to move the truck, when is it acceptable to roll backwards?
  • When there is nobody behind you.
  • In a thunderstorm
  • You shouldn't roll backwards
  • On a grade of more than 3 degrees
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Do not roll back when you start. You may hit someone behind you. Partly engage the clutch before you take your right foot off the brake. Put on the parking brake whenever necessary to keep from rolling back. Release the parking brake only when you have applied enough engine power to keep from rolling back. On a tractor-trailer equipped with a trailer brake hand valve, the hand valve can be applied to keep from rolling back.

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When backing, all of the following are important safety rules:
  • Look at your path
  • Use a helper
  • Turn towards driver's side
  • These are all things that should be observed to back safely
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Backing Safely — Because you cannot see everything behind your vehicle, backing is always dangerous. Avoid backing whenever you can. Park so you will be able to pull forward when you leave. When you have to back, follow these safety rules:

  • Look at your path – Look at your line of travel before you begin. Get out and walk around the vehicle. Check your clearance to the sides and overhead in and near the path your vehicle will take.
  • Back slowly – Always back as slowly as possible. Use the lowest reverse gear so you can more easily correct any steering errors. You also can stop quickly if necessary.
  • Back and turn toward driver?s side – Back to the driver’s side so you can see better. Backing toward the right side is very dangerous because you cannot see as well. If you back and turn toward the driver’s side, you can watch the rear of your vehicle by looking out the side window. Use driver-side backing—even if it means going around the block to put your vehicle in this position. The added safety is worth it.
  • Use a helper – Use a helper when you can. There are blind spots you cannot see. The helper should stand near the back of your vehicle where you can see the helper. Before you begin backing, work out a set of hand signals that you both understand. Agree on a signal for “stop.”
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Most good drivers will look ahead:
  • As far as they can see
  • 12-15 yards
  • 30 seconds
  • 12-15 seconds
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From The CDL Manual

Most good drivers look 12-15 seconds ahead. That means looking ahead the distance you will travel in 12-15 seconds. At lower speeds, that’s about one block. At highway speeds it’s about one-quarter of a mile. If you are not looking that far ahead, you may have to stop too quickly or make quick lane changes. Looking 12-15 seconds ahead does not mean not paying attention to things that are closer. Good drivers shift their attention back and forth, near and far.

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When driving, when is it acceptable to signal other drivers that it is safe to pass?
  • When they are with 100 yards of you
  • Only if it is not raining
  • Only during the daytime
  • Never
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Do not Direct Traffic

Some drivers try to help out others by signaling when it is safe to pass. You should not do this. You could cause an accident, you could be blamed, and it could cost you thousands of dollars.

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When parked on the side of a two-lane road carrying traffic in both directions, place warning devices:
  • Place warning devices 10 feet, 100 feet and 200 feet toward the approaching traffic
  • within 10 feet of the front or rear corners to mark the location of the vehicle and 100 feet behind and ahead of the vehicle, on the shoulder or in the lane you are stopped in
  • Within 100 feet of the front or rear corners to mark the location of the vehicle and 10 feet behind and ahead of the vehicle, on the shoulder or in the lane you are stopped in
  • Wherever it seems logical and safe
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

On a two-lane road carrying traffic in both directions or on an undivided highway, place warning devices within 10 feet of the front or rear corners to mark the location of the vehicle and 100 feet behind and ahead of the vehicle, on the shoulder or in the lane you are stopped in (see Figure 2-9 on page 28).

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A tractor trailer traveling 55 mph will travel how far between when the brain perceives a hazard and stopping?
  • 250 yards
  • 60 feet
  • At least 419 ft
  • 100 feet
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Total stopping distance –

At 55 mph it will take about 6 seconds to stop and your vehicle will travel the distance of a football field (60 + 60 + 170 = 290 feet).

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Whenever you double your speed, it will require how much more distance to stop?
  • 4 times
  • 290 feet
  • 100 feet
  • 2 times
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From The CDL Manual

Effect of speed on stopping distance:

Whenever you double your speed, it takes about four times as much distance to stop, and your vehicle will have four times the destructive power if it crashes. High speeds increase stopping distances greatly. By slowing down a little, you can gain a lot in reduced braking distance.

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The condition in which water or slush collects on the road and your tires lose contact and have little or no traction is called:
  • Hydroplaning
  • Jetpacking
  • Water skiing
  • Black ice
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Hydroplaning:

In some weather, water or slush collects on the road. When this happens, your vehicle can hydroplane. It is like water skiing: the tires lose contact with the road and have little or no traction. You may not be able to steer or brake. You can regain control by releasing the accelerator and pushing in the clutch. This will slow your vehicle and let the wheels turn freely. If the vehicle is hydroplaning, do not use the brakes to slow down. If the drive wheels start to skid, push in the clutch to let them turn freely.

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The general rule for how much space you should leave in front of your vehicle below 40mph is:
  • 150 feet
  • 10 seconds for every 10 feet of length
  • 1 second for every 10 feet of length
  • 10 car lengths
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From The CDL Manual

One good rule for how much space you should keep in front of you is at least 1 second for each 10 feet of vehicle length at speeds below 40 mph. At greater speeds, you must add 1 second for safety

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Posted heights at overpasses:
  • Can be safely ignored
  • Should be trusted without further question
  • Only apply to over-sized loads
  • Should not be assumed to be correct, and extra caution should be used
Click here to look up the answer

From The CDL Manual

Do not assume that the weights and heights posted at bridges and overpasses are correct. Repaving or packed snow may have reduced the clearances since the heights were posted.

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