Profile For AlongCameJones

AlongCameJones's Info

  • Location:
    Lawton, OK

  • Driving Status:
    Considering A Career

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 months, 4 weeks ago

AlongCameJones's Bio

Soldier at Fort Sill. Short.

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Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

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An interesting short tale about a truck driver turned real estate man.

Troll?

You find no amusement value in my writings, PackRat? I feel truck drivers occasionally need some relief from the everyday boredom of white line fever.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

An interesting short tale about a truck driver turned real estate man.

There is the possibility that some have found more prosperity and/or happiness going from truck driving to real estate, or some other line of work. Some might also have found more joy with the gearshift lever of an 18-speed transmission in hand and the awesome sound of turbochargers and jake brakes hand than a PC mouse in hand at an office desk. I'm sure some driving prospects here want to compare truck driving to other possible careers for the amount of potential risks and rewards each has to offer. Mr. Mandolfo had a wife and three boys at that time. He might have given up double-clutching for real estate sales to have a great home-cooked meal from his wife every night vs a choke and puke on some out-of-state desert highway. Driving a Cadillac around the SF Bay Area showing people homes does seem more glamorous to some than being inside a "smelly noisy diesel rig for long hours". But the "smelly noisy diesel rig" in the end might be more efficient at paying the bills than homes sales on commission in 2021, who knows.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

An interesting short tale about a truck driver turned real estate man.

Is the real estae business a safer bet for me? Question: which driver here, if any, has ever sold real estate for a living?

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

An interesting short tale about a truck driver turned real estate man.

Realtors in Boise, Idaho are not nearly as "civilized" as realtors in the San Fransisco Bay Area in California.

In 1981, my mother had done business with a realtor in the SF Bay Area named Joe Mandolfo. He was a handsome 45-year-old gentleman in a suit, tie and drove a clean 1976 Cadillac Seville to show his clients homes.

In 1999, I had a guy from John L. Scott Realty in Boise, ID show me homes. The real-estate company had a classy-sounding name but this man was not very classy in presentation. He had some crude rough-riding Jeep-like vehicle. He was not clean-shaven and dressed rather "blue collar". He spoke like a simpleton too. He was bald and sported a mustache and glasses. He was dressed like he was fit to operate a Caterpilllar tractor (sans hard hat) and not at all like a city-slicker like the Italian realtor in San Francisco, Mr. Mandolfo. I was not taken to a white-table cloth restaurant for lunch but rather a McDonald's in Nampa, ID. Having been spoiled rotten on the Left Coast most my life, it was a real culture shocker going into Boise. In the SF Bay Area, I also knew an insurance broker who drove a nice Mercedes Benz. Always well-dressed and clean-shaven.

Incidentally, slick-dressed Joe Mandolfo in the fancy automobile had told my mother he was once a truck driver earlier on in life. Is being a truck driver or a realtor a better prospect in life? Who of the two jobs makes better net earnings money in 2021? Could any carrier-hired truck driver in 1976 have afforded a new Cadillac Seville back then? Who will die with the mostest nice toys in the end when all is said and done, a realtor or a company freight driver? To me it's all about achieving a certain degree of personal material wealth. If there's not enough dough in it, it doesn't make my cut.

The moral of the story: Don't ever take your Bay Area mentality into any RED state.

Some short story, huh?

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Slip-and-fall safety questions.

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E.T. phone home under the bridge.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

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No, you come up with all the different names because you think you're clever.

You're not.

You're a waste of time and should be blocked.

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Meh,

He's kinda entertaining. Glad we lost PurplePistlePreston (what was it?) though. TomCougar was LOVED, elsewhere!

ToddHolmes, any relation to J?

I'll check the video..

~ Anne ~

ps: DuckDuckGo is NOT undetectable...to the wise(r.) ;) Perks of having an IT/tech savvy kiddo, LoL!

pps: My Ariat Fatbaby II boots are quite slip resistant; on T/T's and mucking stalls. No shower shoes around trucks & hooves, IMHO!

I Googled and found this interesting article on trucking footwear from Schneider. They also talk about gloves and that's another important issue too. You need good hand protection. In the army, soldiers were required to wear flip-flops in the barracks showers for sanitary reasons. I would definately have them in my gear as a driver as well for showers on the road. The Schneider article says some drivers also need steel toes.

https://schneiderjobs.com/blog/best-work-boots-for-truck-drivers

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

The inspiration for my handle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFyr49TwuiI

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

Exactly what I thought too

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Guess whos back? Back Again Todd is back tell your friends

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Hello, Grumpy Old Man. Todd is not really an ugly name. Let's have a conversation on my conversation piece. What do you want to talk about football or Joe Biden? Who's going to the Super Bowl this season?

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

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https://www.okshooters.com/attachments/1633099994860-png.225671/

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OK, let's play this game, let's assume that you are not trolling everybody and are really interested in the slipping problem. Two things come to my mind. First, steps with serrated holes you suggest as a solution are installed on almost every truck, here is picture of my steps for illustration, so no need to recreate wheels. Second, if you are going to apply to trucking the same approach you demonstrate in this thread, you may have significant performance issues resulting in very low income, ultimately leading to being fired. It is a fast paced industry with no place for time-wasting bs.

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Fired or perhaps collecting workman's comp. You must have some serious callouses on your foot bottoms. Those steps look like they would mince my bare feet like deviled ham.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

We don't even understand why you are on your soapbox about this. All our trucks have good footings just like you keep trying to show us.

0111597001633103406.jpg

These are square cut serrated edge. Some are diamond shaped. All are safe.

I don't know a large CIVILIAN commercial truck from a wheelbarrow in all honesty. I make these threads to learn something. For trucks, I know the pickup kind, the army kind and the rented moving kind (at least one brand that has issues in my experience). You people know more about civilian 18-wheelers than I do. I thought this thread would be a GREAT CONVERSATION PIECE. Truckers are a salty lot, indeed. Yes, those cab steps some of you here are showing me do make sense. I have said nothing bad about them. Now, I just learned one more thing about a semi I never knew before. I don't think motor freight companies have much time to deal with W/C claims from slip-fall injuries.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

Slipping off poorly-designed vehicle surfaces for want of good footing or bad choce of footwear doesn't have to be one reason for career failure. Those drivers here who will chime in on their choice of footwear for the job will help others in all seriousness. Footwear and clothing is no small matter. Here is a link to a sensible cab step just like the US military has on newer vehicles as I was talking about. Diamond holes and serrated pattern to dig right into boot soles. This kind of walking surface is the gold standard in anti-skid protection against human slip injuries in wet conditions. I was soldier and an army truck mechanic. I know about these sorts of things.

https://www.okshooters.com/attachments/1633099994860-png.225671/

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

I'm a real trucker and use flip flops all year round.

flip-flops, CB radio slang, return trips, of course!

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

U-Haul truck ramps have ridges across the aluminum for grip LOL @ no stickers for 3 points of contacts is plain ole common sense.

I worked with U-Haul equipment off n on the past 15 years, and never fell off a step or ramp in any bad weather conditions. When I moved back to Arizona back in 2012, I road my motorcycle up into the back in the 26 ft U haul, and backed it off backwards (coasting) without busting my azz lol

My thinking/motto; "Those who can, DO. Those who can't, wish they could" thank-you-2.gif

That Penske aluminum truck ramp also likewise had ridges across it, yet my Nike Air Monarchs slid down them like a river otter on a muddy river bank when the damm thing got wet. The key word here is WET. I afterward put on my soft rubber flip-flops and they stuck to that WET ramp like Krazy Glue. I remembered my flip-flops after slipping and having to run down the ramp with the dolly to keep from tumbling over because shower shoes are, yes, designed for wet conditons and those gym/pool sandals were the grippy-est things I had at the time for my two feet. Think WET as in SHOWER. Somebody must make a closed shoe or a boot with such a superior anti-slip sole for wet conditions but I don't know who does. If you get oil and grease on your soles, things are all the worse.

Ok, commercial drivers what do YOU personally wear for footwear on the job in:

-wet condions? -icy conditions?

Maybe some of you don't need any special anti-skid footwear because the stepping areas on your assigned rigs are already grippy enough. Army boot soles which are hard and army 5-ton truck knife-edge-texture steps are a great team. The sharp surfaces on the these particular steps dig right into even hard or slick boot soles come rain, ice, snow, oil or grease. These steps have a diamond hole pattern over their surfaces. Snow, water, leaves, ice, mud and debris does not accumulate on these steps: the debris falls right through the holes. All vehicle walking/stepping surfaces should be designed in this fashion. Truck ramps and tractor catwalks should have this sharp "cheese-grater" texture too. I think these are much grippy-ier than even diamond plate which has no such holes to eliminate build-up of wetness or debris.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

No, gummy-sole/anti-slip shower shoes should suffice as essential moving equipment in the future. They literally saved my neck during the last move. Anti-slip shower shoes are designed for traction even on soapy gym shower floors so they should hold well on a wet non-soapy aluminum loading ramp. I don't know of any closed shoes or boots that offer such good traction on wet surfaces as a good shower shoe brand.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

Amerucan trucking industry commonly requires a three point contact method of getting in and out of trucks. Instead of mastering this method you preferred to punish Penske (a company with good trucks and good customer service) with one star...

Most people who rent trucks to move have not been trained as professional commerical drivers. They don't teach us those sorts things in high school driver ed. There were no warning signs about three-point hold posted on that rental truck. There was no safety briefing from the truck rental agency. For all I know, Uhaul trucks and others can be just as slippery during the rain. The three-point hold does no good on the loading ramp anyway. Two hands have to be on the dolly so good foot traction is of the essence. I suppose if truck rental companies start get major lawsuits against them, rental trucks will start to have superior anti-skid surfaces on them for human footing. There is no excuse under Mother Nature's golden sun not to have anti-slip surfaces on rented moving trucks or commercial freight trucks, for that matter. I posted those things on Yelp! and Google Reviews because I don't want innocent folks to get hurt on those stupid things in that fashion. Suffice it to say, I will always have to have good anti-slip footwear handy any time I should rent a truck in the future. There's no telling when and where Mother Nature will throw rain on people who are moving. I notified Penske not once but twice by email about the slippery truck incident and they were too chicken to repsond. I only rented a Penske because of better-than-Uhaul rates online and the fact they had diesels in their fleet which are still cheaper to run than gasoline trucks.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

Rubber flip flops in winter conditions? Did you get frost bite or worse? How many toes were amputated?

Ever hear of "Ice Cleats"? I wonder how well they work on flip flops.

No, it was actually warm during that Oklahoma May though rainy and thundering. I had my socks on with my gummy-bottom flip-flops. I had to get the rest of my stuff out of the truck during periods of no rain or light mist. They did in fact keep me from slipping on that wet metal ramp wheeling a dolly down it. I would have prefered some closed-toe footwear with the same degree of superb traction. Maybe some deck shoes like boaters wear?? This thread was meant to face a serious occupational issue. More drivers are probably hurt and collect workman's comp from slip/fall injuries related to bad footing on their vehicle exterior surfaces than from vehicle collisions. I would think that footwear solutions and vehicle foothold solutions would have been well addressed in 2021. Ideally there should be serrated knife-edge surfaces all over a rig where people customarily step to bite into those boot soles. I know this from having witnessed some military vehicles firsthand and driving some. These stepping surfaces should cut your feet up like diced ham if you were to walk over them barefoot.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Slip-and-fall safety questions.

How well-designed are the footing surfaces on newer commercial trucks these days? Slips/falls are the second-leading cause of accidental death according to this following source.

https://nfsi.org/nfsi-research/quick-facts/#:~:text=For%20people%20aged%2065-84%20years%2C%20falls%20are%20the,60%25%20involve%20people%20aged%2075%20years%20or%20older.

I rented a Penske 26' truck in May of 2019 to move from Boise, Idaho to Lawton, Ok. On the last day of unloading the truck, the ramp in back and the cab steps were damp from rainy weather. I was wearing my not-so-cheap Nike Air Monarch athletic shoes. I almost slipped off the cab step once but caught myself by grabbing the door in the nick of time. I also slipped on the loading ramp. I had to run down the ramp with a loaded dolly to keep from falling down. I finally put on my rubber flip-flops to finish the job. They have a gummy soft rubber sole that worked quite well on a slippery metal ramp. The Nike soles are hard rubber and slick for such an expensive shoe. They suck on icy streets and sidewalks to boot. I have some other shower shoes now but they don't have good traction like my older gummy-bottom ones did before they wore out. I have rented Uhaul trucks for moving too but never in wet weather so I can't say as to the level of footing they offer people clambering over them in the rain. I emailed Penske twice about the slippery trucks but they never responded. I complained to some federal consumer agency too about these slippery trucks but they never followed up with a response to me. I gave this company a 1 star in both Yelp! and Google reviews regarding the Penske dangerous lack of footing. I was an American soldier once and younger. Army trucks, at least the 900-series 5-tons, do have sensible cab steps though the military is often stupid about many other things. They have a crisscross diamond hole pattern with sharp serrated knife edges that bite into the soles of hard-rubber combat boots. Never slipped once on these in rain, ice or snow. The tailgates on army trucks, however, have slick sheet metal. No texture for good footing. Civilian commercial trucks should have sensible surfaces on step areas and walkways too. Years ago I had a landscaping trailer with a slick tail metal gate so I riveted on some wood laths parallel for good footing.

Tell us of your solutions for getting a good footing on wet/icy vehicles and/or ground surfaces.

Posted:  2 months, 2 weeks ago

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Have you ever spotted something scary and/or exciting while driving at night?

Driving a rig at night through the woods of the PNW must be especially thrilling. You never know what might cross your path.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Questions about working in the mid-west.

Those northern states just look so pretty in the mid-West. Oklahoma is very flat and dusty. Hot, humid miserable muggy weather. Roads in Sooner State cities are in very bad shape. Those stupid pesky toll roads, turnpikes. Not a lot of mountains, mountain rivers and clear bodies of water. Oklahoma is also plagued by much dust, tornadoes, flash floods and erosion. Crime in Sooner is bit on the high side. I like rolling hills, green grass, clean cool bodies of water, no pollution, no noise, no drama, fresh cooler air, lush forests and canyons. The SOONER I get out here the better I might feel. Idaho is pretty, I've lived there but rent and houses have gotten too high-priced in Boise area. Montana and Wyoming tend to be on the high side too now. I kind of like the idea of a permit-less-concealed-carry state too. Ohio might have more job opportunities than South Dakota because of its population density but I've heard that Cleveland is a dump. Some parts of Pocatello, ID might not be too bad in housing costs. Pocatello is a sizable city.

Posted:  4 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Questions about working in the mid-west.

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Come now, people, I'm not such a bad person.

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You 'kind of' admitted your ID right here, Mr. Holmes. Wherefore, I agreed with you.

No bots, just savvy truckers (and their wives!)

There IS no 'protocol' but for the desire to learn this industry, as Trucking Truth was created for.

Did you ever read these wonderful resources, that Brett and many others (Old School included, and Rainy, as well? MANY of the members have had a part in creating the BEST educational trucking site on the internet.

Wish you well, as have I with EACH and every ID, good sir.

~ Anne ~

Thank you Anne, from whomever you believe I am. I'm sure this line of work has attractive pay. It's a matter of finding the right part of America to live and work in that provides a nice work/life balance. Too much of any one thing is never a good thing. It's not just how much the job pays either. I would rather live in an outdoor paradise making $62K a year than in a desert or an icy tundra making $100K a year. I also have to find a part of America with enough employment opportunity for what I want to do. I hate to live in big concrete jungles.

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