Profile For Onsdag

Onsdag's Info

  • Location:
    American Fork, UT

  • Driving Status:
    In CDL School

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 months ago

Onsdag's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Page 1 of 1

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

The TruckingTruth Meet Up Thread

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Who is the other member and how did you meet?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I'm on the right snd Onsdag is on the left. He introduced himself to me on my first day of training at Roehl here in Marshfield, WI. It was his final week and my first.

double-quotes-end.png

Love this! Hope both y'all do AWESOME, and share the givings (and mis') in the diaries' section!

Best to you BOTH, y'all !!! Haven't seen HIM on here, in a short bit .. (?!?!)

~ Anne & Tom ~

dancing-dog.gif good-luck.gif dancing-dog.gif

ps: Next time you see him, ask him (or if you can?) explain his screen name; thanks!

Thanks Anne, it's been great and Roehl is an amazing company, perfect match for me!

Sorry for the lack of updates - the school is pretty intense and there's very little free time for updates. What little free time we have is usually best spent on homework assignments and prepping for the CDL exam.

As for the origins of the name - midnight fox nailed it. Though I don't drink alcohol or worship Norse deity. ;-)

I actually picked up the name a long time ago. Several family/friends began playing an online game together - Dark Age of Camelot - and one of the factions we played (Midgard) is based on Norse mythology. We wanted a fun and cool way for people to recognize that we were family/friends in the game and so we came up with the idea of using the Norse days of the week for our usernames - I just happened to choose Wednesday, or Onsdag in Norwegian, and it's kinda stuck ever since. ^_^

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

The TruckingTruth Meet Up Thread

Who is the other member and how did you meet?

We met here on Trucking Truth. I saw that we were both going to the Roehl GYCDL program in Marshfield, WI and met up with him there. All students stay at the same hotel, and I recognized him from his profile pic so I made sure to say hi.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

The TruckingTruth Meet Up Thread

First day of training and already meeting other members! It was amazing. Good luck out there Onsdag, and hopefully we'll meet up again.

0955978001654366796.jpg

It was great meeting you! Before you know it you'll have your CDL too!

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

CDL CLP Knowledge Testing-Do you take the tests all at once or individually?

Hello-

I have to say that I'm really surprised at how complicated the process is to get a CDL. I'm enrolling at a local tech college for the ELDT and need to have my CLP to start there. I'm studying the manual and was wondering, are you able to test each section individually or do you take all the tests at one time? Glad I found this resource. I plan to use the course here after I finish reading the manual.

Thank you all for being so generous with your time and knowledge.

Craig

I don't know if other states differ (I doubt it), but in Utah the CDL written exam (to get your learner's permit) you will have to take and pass 3 tests: 1) General knowledge, 2) Combination vehicle, and 3) Airbrakes. You will take all 3 tests at the same time, though they are technically separate sections, and will pay one fee for the test ($52 in Utah). You can also choose to take any of the endorsement tests at that time by paying a ($9 in Utah) fee for each additional test, which includes Tankers, Hazmat, Doubles/Triples, Passenger, and Schoolbus.

I don't know if you are allowed to take each test separately (i.e. take/pass the 3 required, go home, study for and then return later to take whatever endorsements you want). I'm pretty sure you can add the endorsements later, but I would recommend going ahead and studying for and taking everything all at once. The actual tests don't take very long and doing so seems more practical to me than returning to the DMV later to retest. The only real reason I would consider taking them separately is if finances are limited. Even then I'd just save up and do it all at once.

Also, I think you do have to wait to take the hazmat endorsement until you're cleared by the TSA. Other than that though I see no reason not to take them all at once.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Time to jump in the deep end

Well folks, I did it! I ACED ALL 3 Parts!! And I have my start date, May 31st in Marshfield Wisconsin. I'd like to thank everyone involved in the creation of the High Road Training program of all the great information that helped me pass the tests, for everyone's support and words of encouragement and well wishes, and now it's time for my own training diary to pay it forward to anyone who has concerns, thoughts, and to keep everyone apprised of what I'm up to. I can't say thank you enough to everyone on here, I am in your debt.

Congratulations! Absolutely stoked for you!

Maybe we'll cross paths as that's where I am and just started on the 16th. I'm really glad I applied for and was accepted by Roehl, as their values and especially their focus on safety closely mirrors my own. Everyone here has been absolutely wonderful and I know you'll have a great time!

Good luck and keep studying, it'll help make your transition smoother as the program here is pretty intense (in a good way)!

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Getting Hired as a Gig Economy Worker

I just got hired on by Roehl and am in their GYCDL program. My past 3 years of work experience include Domino's Pizza, Instacart, and Doordash. They just required proof that I've worked for or am working with the gig economy jobs - such as tax documents, screenshots of driver profile and earnings within the apps, etc.

I don't know what goes on behind the scenes and what exactly their qualifications are, but they accepted me. I'm certain it probably helps to have a clean driving record.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Study that Handbook

I kinda wish I'd come across this thread earlier. But, since I didn't, I'd also like to proffer my thoughts, based on my own experience, to help others who may follow.

I studied all sections of the HRT and went through the tests about 1.25 times. I did this over the course of about 3 weeks as I had time. I had a basic grasp on much of the materials taught, but there were a few sections that I struggled through (pre-trip inspections - I'm more of a visual and hands-on learner. Also, struggled with logbooks and some of the mathematics and calculations, e.g. fuel weights, burnoff, mileage, etc. I can do it, it just takes a little bit). After successfully completing HRT I started studying my state (Utah) CDL manual. I got about 30 pages in before I tired of it as it covered much* of what the HRT did, and so I decided to go to take the real test at the DMV.

*Note: There were several things covered in the Utah CDL manual that the HRT did NOT cover. At all. At least that I could remember.

I initially tested for General, Combination, and Air Brakes. I failed the General, but passed the other two. As Travis and penn99 noted above there were a number of questions that were asked which were vastly different than what HRT covered. But it was also my fault as I had not prepared as I should have by finishing study of the Utah manual and instead relied too heavily on the knowledge gleaned from HRT. They asked if I wanted to retake the General and I said yes, as well as adding Doubles/Triples and Tanker. The second time I passed the General as they asked more questions that were covered by the HRT, and repeated several that I had failed on the first go so I knew the right answer (you can review your failed questions to learn what the right answer is and why). I also passed the other endorsements.

So, if I were to start over and take it again, or offer my advice to others, my personal opinion would be as follows:

1. Be patient with yourself and don't rush your studies, and, when the time comes, the actual test. 2. Read through your state's manual! It will likely contain material not found in the HRT (or other online practice tests), and may be more specific to your state laws. 3. Study and take the HRT (and/or other online practice tests). You can do this at your own speed, and the HRT test is fantastic in that it regularly tests your knowledge on previous chapters and material covered. Don't be afraid to restart the test or redo chapters that you struggle with. Also, make sure to click on the notes as they often expound on or emphasize important points that are key. 4. Read through your state's manual again, as this will give a refresher on material that is specific to your state and which WILL be found on the test. 5. Don't get too stressed out and worried about knowing every little detail. You don't have to get 100% to pass the test. Furthermore, you can take each test up to 2 times before a second fee is required. I don't know if there is an upper limit on how many times you can retake the test. 6. Go take the test! 7. Remember step 1 - Be patient with yourself. Even though the test is timed you'll find that you have plenty of time, especially if you have studied the material well. If you don't know the exact answer you can usually work through the problem with some common sense (though there are a few tricky ones that seem to go against reason!). Also remember step 5 - If at first you don't succeed, try try again! You will learn from your mistakes and you will also likely be asked many of the same questions, making it easier next time. 8. Success!

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Time to jump in the deep end

Congratulations!

I'm actually in the same position as you. Jumping in the deep end. Got my learners permit last week and applied for Roehl as well. Waiting to hear back from them, and hopefully I can get started in the next couple of weeks.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Looking to take the leap.

Hey guys,

Thanks again everyone for the helpful feedback and advice. I've just completed the High Road Online CDL Training Course and am looking now to take the next steps. I started the process of applying for company-sponsored paid CDL. I've taken a look through the companies suggested above, as well as a few others, and so far my short list is:

Roehl. I'm really liking what I'm seeing so far. Their focus on safety is a big plus for me, and everyone seems to agree their training program is top notch. Also, I'd be employed with them from day one, which is another big positive. A couple of things I'm not sure about though: 1) It appears they primarily operate in the Eastern U.S.? I'm ok with traveling for school, and of course I'm fine with OTR work, but it'd be nice to operate a little closer to home. I'm also uncertain of the logistics of it. I live in Utah and it doesn't look like they have any terminals or yards nearby, so how would I get to/from work? Would they fly me to/from work, or do they have operations in Utah I'm not aware of? 2) It appears they are mostly flatbed? I'm not opposed to hard work, but my age is starting to catch up with me and I'm not sure if I want to be adding the extra miles to the body that flatbed work would entail. Still, I'm not entirely opposed to it, it's just that I'd prefer to not have that extra work-load. And this may be a non-issue as they do have other fleets beside flatbed which I could likely get into.

Prime. They have a school in and also operate out of Salt Lake, which would be nice as it's close to home. This also ensures I get my CDL in my home state. I've heard good things about them as a company, and their training program is more one-on-one and hands on, which I like. A couple of holdbacks: 1) They won't start their next classes for a couple of months. While this does give me some time to get some other things in order, such as getting my learners permit and passport, I'd also like to get going quickly instead of waiting another couple months. 2) While it does look like they pay you while training, you're not officially employed by them until after you successfully complete training and get your CDL, which they say could take 3-4 months, which could be as late as October.

Posted:  3 months ago

View Topic:

Looking to take the leap.

Awesome. Thanks for the helpful feedback everyone! Getting more excited as we speak!

Posted:  3 months ago

View Topic:

Looking to take the leap.

Hi everyone!

I've been considering a trucking career and visiting this site on occasion trying to learn what I can for a little over a year now. It's a big leap into the unknown, and definitely would take me outside of my comfort zone, but something I feel is right for me at this point in my life. However I keep letting fears of the unknown, lack of knowledge, waiting for a 'better' time, lack of money, etc., hold me back from taking that leap. Well, I'm tired of that. It's time to take my future in my own hands and just take the leap. There will be no better time than the present. And I'm reaching out to you, the TT community, for help, advice, and encouragement in taking that leap.

Steps that I have taken so far:

I'll continue to take and finish (hopefully completed this week) the High Road CDL Training Program as time allows. After which I hope to take the CDL Practice Tests.

Questions, concerns, unknowns in moving forward at this point:

Manual Transmission - I've never driven a manual transmission before. I'm not afraid of learning or doing it, however I am concerned about a steep or costly learning process. As a child I remember my mother having the most difficult time learning it, burning several clutches, and ultimately switching back to automatic transmissions. How difficult is it for a complete novice to learn? I know there are plenty of automatic trucks out there, but I'd prefer not to be limited to only using them. Besides, I love learning and have always wanted to learn the manual but have never really had opportunities or a teacher, so this is a perfect opportunity I think.

Background check - As a teenager I did some stupid things, which I sought religious and professional counseling for, self-reported to the police, and went through the legal system in order to try doing what was right and correcting the problems. I was originally charged on a second degree felony, but it was reduced to a misdemeanor after successfully completing therapy and court-ordered probation. I've been clean ever since (20+ years now). I'm certain this'll come up in a background check, and I'm definitely not going to try hiding or glossing over it, but my question is when it comes time to acknowledge it do I report it as a felony or misdemeanor? In past job applications I report it as a misdemeanor as that is what it was reduced to, unless the application has specific wording such as "have you ever been convicted of a felony?" in which case I would say yes as that was the original conviction. However, reading through the forums it seems potential employers will know every little thing and want to see if you're being completely honest with them and I'm afraid if I do report it as a misdemeanor they'll think I'm trying to be dismissive of it or not be completely truthful with them.

Accidents - similar to the above, how much detail needs to be provided? About 15 years ago I was in a car accident and the other person was cited as being at fault. Another time, about 4 years ago, I had a very minor accident with a bicyclist, police weren't called and no report was filed... until he came to my work (business markings on vehicle) a couple of hours later with one of his friends (who hadn't been at the scene) asking for insurance information. I suspected he/they were trying to commit insurance fraud and so after they gathered my insurance information and left I went down to the police station and filed a report. It wasn't an accident report as the police said both parties left the scene, but it was a police report nonetheless. I had a dashcam which recorded everything, and the officer who looked at it said he wasn't going to cite anybody since it was after the fact, but that he would've cited the cyclist as being at fault as they were disobeying several traffic laws (such as going against the flow of traffic and not yielding the right of way). By the way, the dashcam saved me and the insurance claim was dropped in that case. Would either of these be pulled up in a search and/or need to be reported?

School - I don't have the money and so plan on applying through this site to a company that will provide training and hire me right away. Will they pay for and take care of everything including my learner's permit, DMV records, endorsements, etc.? Or do I need to save up money to pay out of my own pocket? I'd like to get started as soon as possible so I can actually start making money because I'm completely broke at this point. I'm also afraid that if I delay then I'll start to lose the courage to take the leap, or find some other excuse to back down, and I think committing to a company will help hold my feet to the fire.

Page 1 of 1

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More