Profile For ambrose_johnson

ambrose_johnson's Info

  • Location:
    Fort Sill, OK

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 weeks, 2 days ago

ambrose_johnson's Bio

American, model railroad buff, civil engineering buff

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Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

Duck walking under a rig might be a deal-breaker for some considering this gig. It's certainly something an Uber driver doesn't have to do. Only you know your own body better than any company doctor giving you a physical. Before considering driving a truck, do some work bending, squatting, stooping and crouching to see how your own body fares as a personal home test. Rotate your own automobile tires at home using a car jack, wheel chocks and jack stands to see what your level of endurance is. Torquing down the lug nuts by hand can be strenuous enough to make you short-winded or have a racing heart. The exertion situation is much worse during extreme hot or cold weather. Squat down, don't kneel, to weed your yard by hand. Squat down to clean your home's toilet and baseboards around your walls. See how your joints and bones and muscles feel. Do you get short-winded after standing up from a prolonged squatting position? Does your heart beat fast or do you feel dizzy upon standing back up? Try duck walking as an exercise to see if your heart palpitates, you feel dizzy or short winded. Truck driving might not be ideal for chronic arthritis sufferers or those with certain orthopedic, cardiovascular or respiratory issues.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

Out of curiosity, I did a Google search to study the PHYSICAL JOB REQUIREMENTS of truck drivers and found out this according to the DOT:

Physical Requirements of the Job.​ As regulated by the Department of Transportation and other government agencies, truck drivers must be able to perform the following to prove adequate health and fitness: Pass a Department of Transportation physical and drug test. Be able to walk 20 minutes a day without exertion. Enter and exit equipment by stepping and kneeling. Lift 40 lbs. from your waist to your shoulders. Lift 30 lbs. from the floor to your head. Crouch and squat for pre- and post-trip inspections. Push 80 lbs. and pull 100 lbs. horizontally. Repeat the actions shown in the exercise videos below.

Squatting and crouching might prove troublesome for me knowing my own body. Often being in a prolonged squat or a crouch, I will feel light-headed, dizzy, short of breath and/or heart feel heart palpitations esepcially when recovering from this position. When doing work down low, I have an easier time on my hands and knees, or sitting in a chair, sitting on the edge of the bathtub to clean the toilet, lying on a mechanic's creeper, laying on my side on the floor or laying on my stomach. When I put air in the tires of my car, I need to use a folding chair.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

As Clint Eastwood once said, a man (or woman) has to know his/her limitations. More than how much money you can make, you have to know what your physical, mental and spiritial limits are. A good thing to know is the exact lifting requirements of the job. How many pounds is a local shipping container driver, for example, supposed to lift (using body mechanics) on a regular basis besides his own body weight up into the cab seat? This question is dead serious. A driver on some other web source claimed that delivering fuel to a gas station was "not that labor-intensive". The hose supposedly weighed 15 pounds. Gravity does most of the work.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

You say you're an experienced driver and a rail road buff, but you don't know the answers to these simple questions?

In the spirit of trucking truth and helping the lurkers, no, shipping containers do not move on straight trucks.

Drivers do not put on or pull off containers, but they are responsible for securing them to a chassis.

Experienced in the army. Mostly straight trucks. Very minimal tractor trailer work. No shipping container experience. I don't know all the answers and that is why questions are asked here. It is now looking apparent that trailer trucks might be the way to go for couch potatoes. The less I touch the goods in back, the better.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

So I have a job where I drive straight trucks some days and big trucks other days. I make the same amount of money (hourly) either way. The straight truck is very labor intensive where as the most I do during the day on the big truck is getting in and out of the truck. Both are hauling fuel but the straight trucks are for small commercial stops and home deliveries where my semi is only used to haul product around town. It really depends on the type of work you’re looking for and what you want to do. I’ve had jobs both local and OTR delivering beer, milk, general freight, building materials and now fuel that have been very labor intensive but I’ve also had to hand unload a 53’ dry van by hand a few times. If you just want to drive and not do much else, drive a dump truck.

What I have in mind is "no-touch" loads, but I'm now gathering that doesn't seem to exist much in straight truck work. Probably, driving shipping container trucks, including the trailer and tractor types, locally is "the easy chair of the trucking world". Do they even make straight trucks for shipping containers? Flatbed straight trucks for containers? What driver labor could be involved in putting on or pulling off a steel 20, 30 or 40' intermodal container? Don't they use big machines for that? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

What am I missing here?

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

I have holding a steering wheel in mind inside a climate controlled cab, not sweaty hard labor. I also have a 40-48 hour work week in mind. I will simplify it. I have hauling FREIGHT in mind. Both commodities and finished goods. Forget about cement mixers and such. This freight could be food, grain, gasoline, milk, livestock, shipping container, coal, lumber or Samsung SmartTVs. Is some type of CDL still prudent to have for those pursuing a career as a paid driver, employed by somebody else, of a non-trailer truck for commercially hauling freight? A non-trailer freight vehicle has a number of advantages. Easier to park, back and maneuver. No labor-intensive trailer to hook up and inspect. Some places are just too small and impractical to try to get a trailer truck into to serve customers. Non-trailer trucks have their place in our economy. Hard labor? No forklifts?

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

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Are there some local professional drivers driving trucks sans trailers that make as much as, if not more than, 18-wheeler drivers do?

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I'm confused....sans means without, so what kind of trucks are you talking about? Box trucks?

That's exactly what I mean. Trucks without trailers hooked up to them. When you say "box truck" do you mean something like a moving van? There are many kinds of commercial trucks without trailers. Cement mixers. Dump trucks. Moving vans. Flatbeds. Grain trucks.

What does a local trailer truck driver typically make in comparison with a "box truck" driver? Do CDL drivers get paid more than non-CDL drivers?

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Any tips for bobtailing long distances in winter?

I would refuse to drive more than 100 miles bobtail on good weather days; but none at all for snow. It's too dangerous on snow covered roads and too rough a ride in general. There's no lack of trailers at Marten Transport that I know of.

Mr Rat, is it true that tractors with advanced/modern airbag suspensions will handle snow better and ride not so much like a wheelbarrow while driving in bobtail mode? Can ride softeness be dialed in on these rigs?

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Do local drivers of trailer trucks make the most money?

Are there some local professional drivers driving trucks sans trailers that make as much as, if not more than, 18-wheeler drivers do?

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