Profile For Bel A.

Bel A.'s Info

  • Location:
    Sarcoxie, MO

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 8 months ago

Bel A.'s Bio

Simply - Team husband and wife LTL drivers - 10 years.

Page 1 of 2

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  3 years, 11 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Coming up on a year with my linehaul job for ODFL. I figured I'd pop back in and let everybody know that running linehaul for OD just gets better and better. After learning the ins and outs of linehaul, how to work with dispatch and planners, where the terminals are located, how things are done at each individual terminal, and just learning how to operate a rig better with more experience, I've been able to just settle in and enjoy my job even more. The culture at OD is awesome, the pay and bennies are fantastic, and I'm just having a blast running linehaul. Sure, it's hard work, but I wouldn't wanna do any other type of trucking, or work for any other company. I'm a lifer, Lord willing.

Told ya you'd be alright ya big girl.

Was that only a year ago?

You owe us breakfast now.

Over and out.

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

double-quotes-start.png

6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah, that's the concern I have. I don't want to send people on a wild goose chase and get their hopes up that they're going to come out of school making $60k+ and be home every night. In fact, 6 String is the first and only student I've ever come across that landed an LTL gig out of school. To this day I haven't heard from anyone else who has had any luck. But we'll dig around a bit and see what we can find out.

There's a few other LTL outfits that have lowered their entry requirements, and all experience seasonal shortages. Often it's a case of 'Johnny on the spot', not all are fortunate to be in the right place at the right time, or have the financial ability or patience to wait.

LTL can be a boring job for some. We're just leaving the company after 7 years, my only other option was to run solo with them - would have involved commuting 800 miles a week, and a dedicated run. Honestly a ddedicted run would have a gun to my head in about 2 weeks time, routine bores me to tears. Others like the security.

So, I bought my own truck cash, and will run open deck freight, leased on to a company's authority, mama can stay at the house and tend the garden.

I digress - YES, it's rare to land a 60k+ job straight out of school, BUT - it does reinforce the importance of paying for your own training and RESEARCHING (not just with a keyboard) your career.

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

By the way, we are indeed planning on adding a bunch of LTL carriers to TruckingTruth. I'm not sure if we're going to put them in a separate category or blend them in with the other companies but we're definitely going to add them to the list.

Because we're focused on new drivers we'll only add LTL companies that we can confirm are willing to hire students out of school or train people right off the street.

That would be a good idea, confirming, that is.

We work out of an ODFL terminal that does not hire off the street, or put people through school. You can hire on as a dock worker first, and then apply for the driving school, but that's not a guarantee.

6 string was fortunate to catch the right company at the right time - some stunning growth in the company demanded a temporary change in policy to recruit more drivers. 8 years ago they wanted 2 years minimum and your first born child - the growth rate and driver retention crisis has warranted a different approach in SOME areas at SOME times.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Exact First Year Income. Week by Week!

double-quotes-start.png

There is one thing I do not understand. What is the "Tiered Pay" thing?

double-quotes-end.png

I honestly don't know. I got Tiered pay at Central Refrigerated but not at Prime. Maybe someone more educated in finances can answer this. Sorry!

Maybe "tiered", as in 100-150 mile run @ x cpm, 150-300 mile run @ y cpm, 300-500 mile run @ z cpm . . . ?

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

On second thoughts, I'm disappointed somebody didn't shove their LTL job down my throat earlier in my career - it would have saved me 3 years of refrigerated deliveries at $40,000/year, with a heap of unpaid time.

I , like Jopa, had little idea what those wiggle wagons were doing running up and down the road until the opportunity came up.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Well fellow drivers ..

I say everyone to their own ,,, if we just ignore this one ,and not reply ! the thread will stop ..OR the OWNER can simply ban the person ..I know this is harsh ...but it's a thought ..

I've again done it all in the industry 34+ yrs out here ,I don't bragg , NOR do I shove my job down others throats ,,So 6 string you minght want to take heed in that simple advice ....and cease ...! ....or don't .......

I don't understand what your point, or purpose is. Your posts are difficult to comprehend at best. The intentions of your posts - I'm not sure - Jealousy? You'll have to inform me, at least, what brings you back to this guys thread when it seems to irritate you.

"I don't brag" - preceded by "I've again done it all in the industry 34 years" is an oxymoron. That's about as good as "I gave up smoking, drinking and chasing women - followed by "Darn - I left my whiskey and smokes at the *****house".

The guy isn't shoving his job down anybodys' throat. You can either read and absorb, or dismiss it as BS and carry on. You've done it all, as you say - so go ahead, give us a detailed summary of your 34 years of financials in the industry and let some new drivers know the right way to go for their situation. You've done it all right, Super secret squirrel government loads, hazmat tankers, multi axle OD loads, wher you had to wait for a city to build a bridge for you to cross . . .

"Take heed in that simple advice . . . . and cease . . !" Take some of your own advice.

Oh, and for what little it's worth with my pitiful 10 years experience - I've met a lot of liars and losers in this industry, that can barely rub two nickels or brain cells together after a long career - and I can tell you everything posted on here is 100% the truth, because I work at the same company in a different state - and believe you me - if he got ANYTHING wrong, I'd correct him on it.

Good day, sir.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Get off my thread you crazy, muzzily speaking, too independent thinkin' truck owner!!! smile.gif

I'm almost working banker hours with this new schedule! Congrats on raking in that dough.

Down to 25 minutes for a hook, if I don't take time to wipe my nose.

Start your own damn thread ...

Hee hee!!!! I like pilfering through yours!

Aaaah, the usual hours - all over the place, I saw your text this morning in AZ, the Kiwi guy sent his ph# so I yakked with him this afternoon for a half hour.

Goood to see you're paying it forward here - saving souls from OTR. Go on, tell them how I had to talk you out of Crete not once, but 3 times . . . and how you owe me your first born child for repayment !

I've got my own one going on the other forum - check it out if you get bored. Just about there, just my own fear to conquer.

Happy New Year.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Another thing, before I forget. I've been getting a lot of private messages lately on LTL. I'm glad the thread has been helping folks out!

I don't mind the private messages at all, and I try to respond as soon as I can. But, I'd like to encourage readers to post their questions here on the forum, so that others can benefit from the questions and responses. I like that this thread could also serve as an open dialog, besides just my own posts.

Quit whining and get to answering PM's. You haven't been doing enough miles anyway!

Year end $84,000 each. Been verrrrry lazy. Mikey hit $100k, he's team also.

Thought I'd poke my nose in on your thread. Nice pictures. Still taking you an hour to hook those puppies?

Muahaha! Back to wrestling the southwest . . . the IRS, DMV, the KW and LS . . .

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

From New Zealand

In the middle of B F Arizona . . I'll get back witcha.

Might be easier if I call ya.

+64 - . . . . ?

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

High paying CPM reality?

double-quotes-start.png

Often missed is LTL - I team at .68cpm, average 3000 a week, and gross over $2000/week.

Our solos run 2500-3000 miles at over .54 cpm.

One user on here that I have met in person hired on straight out of CDL school , trained for 3 weeks and is on his first solo run tonight.

For him, $70k + gross in his first year is great!

Just to show it is possible.

double-quotes-end.png

Bel A. Could you share your company's name?

Yes - it's Old Dominion.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Couple more things. You should be getting a white sheet of paper that lists your trips, miles, accessory pay, rate per mile, total miles for the week etc. They're transitioning to a web/computer system, whether this is just for the trip breakdown, or the physical sealed paycheck - I'm unsure. Seems we're the last to have it implemented - but if you're not getting some pay info then I'd guess they're on the new system and haven't informed you about it.

Ask your compliance/log or linehaul manager about the paper logs - you should have passed the certification period by now.

Got that lesion cut out today and cauterised and stitched, looks like I've been bar fighting again. They're sending it off for biopsy and I'll find out next week if it's malignant or not and wether or not they'll have to remove some more flesh from the lip. Lido caine is wearing off now, so I'll move on to more traditional pain management systems, AKA Rolling Rock, mow the lawns and go split some more of that oak tree up.

Keep safe, have a good week - I called your terminal manager and said you really enjoyed back to back Jersey City runs - he said he'd hook you up. Good of me, right! :) B.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

LTL Trucking - My linehaul job

Week 4 completed. I've now been to all the states up in New England. Even took a ferry from VT to NY across a lake ;) One of my runs this past week had me going up to Maine. It was a 500+ mile trip one way, which gave me 1000+ miles in two days - nice. I'm getting to know some of the terminals now, not really needing directions as much anymore. That kind of repetition is what I love about my job; it's only going to get more 'boring.' Which is good for me. The more I do the job, the more comfortable I get. The more I also realize I could never do OTR now. Having to find new customer locations or shippers / receivers on a weekly basis would actually be what I'd consider a negative of the job, besides being away from home for weeks at a time. As I've gotten older, I prefer more routine and the expected. Perhaps when I was younger I would've enjoyed OTR.

If I wasn't doing linehaul for an LTL company, I'd probably look into tanker jobs for local trucking companies. Interestingly enough we have another member here that just recently posted about possibly looking for more hometime, and he's looking at tanker jobs. I always wanted to drive a tanker. But it looks like something pretty major would have to happen for me to leave my cush LTL gig. The company I work for is not one many drivers walk away from.

My company has us on e-logs, but during training we need to also maintain a paper logbook. I'm hoping this will be waived soon enough, not sure how long they need me to do the paper logs until they're satisfied with what they're looking for. I already knew how to do a logbook once I graduate from trucking school. it's just one more thing I have to do while running, but hey, I'm a company man. smile.gif

My shifting is getting more smooth. I don't use the clutch anymore except for downshifting or starting in gear. I actually find a difference between the Cascadias that have a detroit engine and a cummins. The engine brakes on a detroit kick in faster, which affects shifting while floating the gears. You need to be a little faster in between the gears while moving the stick. Of course this is nil if the jake is off. But then again, I can still notice a difference in shifting. Even having the air conditioning on will affect how the truck shifts and runs.

I'm learning more stuff by experience for hooking up and breaking down sets of doubles, little tips and tricks. I'll try to remember to share these tidbits once I write my doubles tutorial.

I haven't posted much lately about paychecks. As always, I only provide this info so that anybody interested in looking into LTL linehaul will know generally what to expect. My company is one of the top paying companies, so your mileage might vary. Suffice it to say that last pay period I cleared over $900 for the week - after taxes. I'm still trying to figure out how the paycheck is broken down, so I couldn't quite see how many miles I ran. I think I've been close to about 1800 miles per week, which is going to increase the faster I get. I should be eventually running 2300-2700 miles per week. Also, my cpm actually increased lately. Looks like I'm at .57 now. I'll top out at a little over .60 in about 2 years. Unless there's another raise of course. dancing.gif

They'll be a payraise next year, same time as this year. It just went into effect last weeks paycheck, so teams are on .6853 cpm, and I'm going to guess your solo rate will 61 or 62 cpm by the time you hit the top rate, plus the raises over the next 2 years - could be 65 cpm or more by the time that happens.

They pretty much give that cost of living raise every year that they meet or exceed profit. And throw a discretionary amount in your 401k plan in Jan/Feb based on the same criteria. Make sure you get in on the 401k. We put 30% of our plan into ODFL stock from the get go, 7 years ago. The ODFL stock has gone from $16 to $70 a share in 7 years. Putting in 6%, the company match of 3%, has grown the plan to over $220,000 as of this month.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

The Least Stressful Job For A Rookie Driver

double-quotes-start.png

Kind of hard to say AJ. LTL and city would be more stressful for me. I liked being regional and love what I am doing now, (OTL). Not sure there is a lower position on the ladder though. Just depends on what you want to do and if you truly enjoy it, there will be less stress. I think you can consider moving into another division a promotion if you started somewhere you didn`t want to be and worked hard to move to where you did want to be.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks RT ...

btw, what is OTL?

On The Lamb ?

Running from the law sounds stressful to me !!!

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

AJ's Truck Driving Journey

Good luck! Wear that sunscreen while you're hogging them fields, that sun is still putting a hurt on the skin!

ODFL will probably look at you when the busy season starts in April/ May - by which stage you'll have 9 months in.

Greasy side down !

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Usa truck

10 speed governed at 62 mph. Live load and unload at both ends. Time to make that miracle happen.

Yup. You can't beat solid math. Give it your best crack.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Usa truck

double-quotes-start.png

Driver U, welcome to the forum!

You didn't share with us how long you've been driving, but I'm going to take a wild guess that you are pretty new to this industry. Your post indicates a real misunderstanding about how HOS violations not only have a negative effect on the drivers, but also have a negative effect on the company's CSA score. Companies don't intentionally try to mess up their CSA scores. Every successful driver wants to be pushing his hours - I'm bumping up against the clock all the time. It just so happens that when you are up against the clock that shows that you are productive, and it also shows on your paycheck that you know how to play this game like a true professional. If you want to make some real money at this you will always be running out your clock - if you are not you are leaving way too many miles on the table.

The driver makes the final call on whether he will violate the rules or not. There is no physical way that manager can get in that truck and force you to break the rules. You have got to be the professional who knows how to manage his time and know whether you can commit to a load or not. If you get a load that can't be done then you just let them know. It is as clear cut as that. It is not your driver managers responsibility to keep up with your hours, and I sure wouldn't ever count on weekend dispatch to be watching out for me.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've talked to my safety officer, she just says well you accepted the hours of the assignment so your at fault.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

As harsh as it may seem to you, your safety officer is correct. You are the one responsible. One of the worse elements of being a driver manager is the element of having to babysit grown adults day in and day out. They grow weary of this stuff. Be the kind of driver who amazes his manager at getting things accomplished. The top drivers in any fleet do this stuff day in and day out. The managers give them loads and they somehow magically figure out how to make it work. If it is going to be impossible, they tell the manager and they will see if they can get a delivery appointment changed or whatever needs to happen so that it can be done legally.

I'm sure there are drivers at USA Truck who are getting all the miles they can handle, and making top dollar without experiencing the problems that you've accused the company of causing you. The reason I can say that with confidence is because that is true at almost any major carrier. This is where you need to focus your efforts. Work hard at your trip planning and being fully aware of what kind of hours you have available to you. Refuse to run a load that can't be done, but learn to manage those clocks so that you are the guy that they can depend on to be the one who somehow always manages to be able to pull things off. That is the way I built my reputation as a top tier driver, and it will work for you also. Once you have established yourself as a truly professional driver who understands how the game is played the load planners will be looking for your truck when they need some help with some really good loads. The guys who can always seem to get the job done are the guys who keep getting the "good stuff".

double-quotes-end.png

my only question is how do you bump up against the clockwhile not having to reset?

8.75 hours a day on duty/driving would give you enough to roll over indefinitely, the reality of that happening is another matter.

One day sitting or only using 2 hours will trip that up quickly.

I burn 60 in 5 days and then reset, though we've managed to run 8400 miles team in 8.5 days before.

Not a lot you can do apart from shoving that puppy in to sleeper or off duty at EVERY available opportunity.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Usa truck

Today's schedual 10 break ends at 11 am hebron ky First Pu 11:30 Dayton oh Drop nashville 1600 Pu nashville 1600 Drop Atlanta 0100

Dayton - Hebron is 70 miles. Unless you've got a 13 speed with 2.64 rears, and a police escort - I'm not sure you'll make that pickup on time - !

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Advice on Trucking overall

A thousand mile journey starts with a single step.

Though small, you've just taken it.

I believe there is a thread on here for company sponsored training.

Prime and Swift come to mind.

Remember - you are starting on your back foot, the company will be offering you everything. Therefore adversity and sacrifice will be encountered. A positive mindset will be of paramount importance.

Good luck. Stand by.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Expenses on the road, what expenses?

As a company driver -

Miles × CPM = Gross wage.

From your gross, subtract non taxable deductions like 401k contributions.

Then subtract state and federal tax, social security and medicare,

Health dental and vision insurance, short and long term disability plans come out next.

Now take out any 401k loan repayment, cash advances, and any amounts that your employer has deemed you responsible for - load locks, safety equipment etc ( though IMO all equipment should be supplied that is necessy for the job).

The result should be your net figure. And may it be as large as possible, sir.

Posted:  4 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you pay rent?

If you haven't started trucking yet, I'd leave it for a month or two till you're settled in before you up sticks and move out, but it's a great savings vehicle to live in the truck and use a motel or family on your down time.

Page 1 of 2

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More