Profile For OldRookie

OldRookie's Info

  • Location:
    VA

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 years, 4 months ago

OldRookie's Bio

Mid-50s guy... attended Millis CDL school - Eden, NC . Currently a solo OTR driver for Millis.

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Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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OTR: Paying your dues to land a regional gig?

My company, Millis, will run you Regional (5 out, 2 home) straight out of school/training.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Mentor Problems

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Well, I guess I'll have to hang up my boots then. I am one of those people who can't go back to sleep when awoken

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Trucking takes an incredible amount of flexibility and tolerance and patience. It's rare that someone with rigid views or stringent requirements can tolerate the OTR lifestyle. It kind of sounds like this whole thing might be more than you had bargained for. If you're looking for a lifestyle of consistency, trucking will be a nightmare. You can't really make trucking conform to your preferences. It just isn't that type of job or lifestyle. You have to learn to work within the system, work with the schedules you're given, deal with the traffic and weather and breakdowns, and get the job done day in and day out no matter what it takes.

That's why the failure rate for new drivers is so high. Only a small percentage of people who make an attempt at this industry make it more than a few months. In fact, at company-sponsored programs fewer than half of the people they bring in even manage to get their CDL, and that's the easiest part of the whole journey.

And by the way, you can adapt to these things. Like the whole "I can't go back to sleep once I wake up". Well then you're not tired enough if that's the case! It's something you learn to do. Anyone can do it.

I always tell people that I "sleep like a trucker" because I can fall asleep anytime, anywhere and wake up anytime, anywhere and be at full speed in a matter of minutes. That's one of the things you really have to learn to do if you're going to perform at a high level out there. You have to be an opportunist. You make the most of every opportunity, whether that means grabbing a quick nap in the middle of the afternoon, throwing in a load of laundry in the middle of the night, or grabbing a quick sandwich while you're getting repairs done. You do what you have to do.

Hang in there and give it more time. Remember, this is the toughest time in your trucking career. Once you get to the one year mark you'll have ironed out most of the problems and you'll have adapted to the lifestyle. In the beginning it's really tough for most people. You don't want to quit during the hard part. At least wait until you've been out there long enough to get decent at the job before you decide if it's for you or not.

Re Brett's comment above that fewer than half of company-sponsored training program "students" achieve even the minimum amount of success, i.e. only half succeed in getting their CDL... I believe that speaks much more about the quality of the programs than it does about the students.

Think about it... what other training program, school, educational environment, etc. could have that dismal a record and yet continue to operate without being redesigned? The simple fact of the matter is either the program's design is seriously flawed, its implementation is horrible and/or the admissions process is admitting people that are not suitable to/for the program.

Some percentage of failure is to be expected and is typically, perfectly, acceptable in any endeavor. But, fifty percent!... come now, certainly this industry can do better than that. So... Why don't they?

Why hasn't/doesn't the industry correct the situation? Well, it seems to me, there are only two possibilities. One... they are not capable of recognizing and correcting the problems, i.e. they are just plain stupid. Or two, the companies believe it makes more business sense to live with the failures, than to make the necessary adjustments to improve the situation.

No one can make the case that the trucking industry's major players are just plain stupid. So, it must be that a simple business decision has been made to accept the status-quo.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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How many and for how long?

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Drove with CRST for less than 22,000 miles in about four months. Team driving isn't for me. Drove for Roehl for almost a year. Max effort and miles on my end equaled one, two cent raise on their end. Had three dispatchers there that I could not trust. Been at Millis since March. 70,000 miles, 35% more net pay, faster truck, love my dispatcher, fridge, Direct TV, two bunks, I can idle the truck, no reefer loads, lots of bonus options.

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Packrat... Looks like you've had an interesting couple of years. I'm glad you're happy at Millis... as Amy I.

Typo correction: as Amy I = as am I

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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How many and for how long?

Brett said: ... I ran regional where I was home on weekends for a couple of years and I loved it...

Brett... You drove for 12 years? How many different companies?

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

How many and for how long?

Drove with CRST for less than 22,000 miles in about four months. Team driving isn't for me. Drove for Roehl for almost a year. Max effort and miles on my end equaled one, two cent raise on their end. Had three dispatchers there that I could not trust. Been at Millis since March. 70,000 miles, 35% more net pay, faster truck, love my dispatcher, fridge, Direct TV, two bunks, I can idle the truck, no reefer loads, lots of bonus options.

Packrat... Looks like you've had an interesting couple of years. I'm glad you're happy at Millis... as Amy I.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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How many and for how long?

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So are you staying with Millis or looking to change?

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Big Scott... I don't have any plans to leave Millis.

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ME either!

Packrat... I'm glad you're happy at Millis. Based on your profile, it looks like Millis is not your first rodeo. Care to elaborate?

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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How many and for how long?

Stayed at my first company for six months. Moved on to much, much greener pastures. Don't ever plan on leaving where I'm at now. Been driving for almost a year.

ACO476... Good for you... I'm glad it worked out. Based on your experience, what advice, if any, can you offer to others that may help them to select the 'right company for them, to start with,' and avoid having to make a change later?

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

How many and for how long?

I'll stick with OldRookie's original question, without reading in any additional motives.

I went to Swift's Driving Academy, and have been with them coming up on 3 years. No reason for me to switch. In my first year I took on three driving assignments: OTR, regional dedicated and daily shuttle.

It's a good idea to see just how many people went for the so-called greener grass.

Errol... Thanks. Your experience at Swift demonstrates one advantage of working for one of the largest companies out here... i. e. three different positions, one company. Also, I agree it will be interesting/informative to hear about/learn from the experiences of others.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

How many and for how long?

I drive for H. O Wolding. Been here 11 months. I was considering changing companies to doing a little different type of freight. But all things considered I will probably stay.

Patrick... I can certainly understand why one may decide to switch types of freight. Going in, as a rookie, it's hard to REALLY know which type of work/freight you will be happy/most productive with.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

How many and for how long?

So are you staying with Millis or looking to change?

Big Scott... I don't have any plans to leave Millis.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

View Topic:

How many and for how long?

I'm curious, how many different companies have you driven for/did you drive for, during your career, and how long were you in each position?

I'll start...

First company... Solo OTR for a little over 1 year and counting.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Two right turn lanes....

I have to say, you guys are scaring me. It's one thing for someone in school to ponder how to make a turn. But experienced drivers? Come on!

How are you going to make a right turn if you have a telephone pole on your right and cars on your left?

And if you're in the inside lane, how is it easier to see a car on your left when the tractor is turned to the right? The left side of your trailer will be completely blind once your tractor starts the right hand turn. Think about it. There's no way you can know if someone is alongside you or not under those conditions.

But if you were in the outside lane you can see down the entire right hand side of your trailer with your spot mirror as you're making a broad, sweeping right hand turn. Not only that, but you can swing as far to the left as you need to because there's no one else out there.

You folks are scaring me.

And I don't care what any DOT guy said. Common sense tells you that you have more room and better vision making all turns from the outside lane, regardless of their direction.

I'm just reporting what I was told... I didn't say I agree with or follow the direction.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Two right turn lanes....

I was always told to use the right lane. On right hand turns your on the inside, on left hand turns your on the outside. Reason being, is that you can see down the drivers side better than the blind side. I haven't had any trouble making the right hand turns.

Diver,

I was told the same by a Virginia DOT CDL testing officer who explained to me that it is ALWAYS the right most turn lane.

So, if there are 2 right hand turn lanes, you start from the curbside lane just as you always would.

Then, just as you may need to breach the double yellow, on occasion, when there is only one right turn lane... you may/likely will need to breach the left most right turn lane in order to not take out any poles curbside.

However, it will be more safe because you have better visibility.

Of course, in practice, it may be best to simply line up straddling both lanes, in essence, "playing defense"... albeit aggravating everyone who wants to sneak around you :-)

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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Which company would you suggest?

Hey Robert, thank you for your advice, I also have been looking at the benefits, I spoke with Prime today as a matter of fact, they stated that because I was terminated from my last full time job (even though I have had another job for 4 years, the same job) that they couldn't hire me for 6 months! I figured that they would be the best option for me as they had what I was looking for as far as home time, pay and benefits. I'm now looking at CRST. I need to get this ball rolling and can't wait for 6 months. I have my permit and medical card already, it really shouldn't be that hard to find a company that I could stick with but it's proving more difficult than I expected! C. R. England isn't off the table but the way the recruiter skimmed over the bad stuff is not what I'm looking for, I want upfront, clear answers and I am actually getting them from CRST and Prime obviously. I also understand that I will be gone for some time especially at the start however, C. R. England also stated that 6 weeks is the minimum you will be gone from start of first class to the first time you can even ASK for home time. I'm good with 6 weeks but there is no guarantee even after you ask for home time that you will be there until you finish phase 2. That's not just 6 weeks it's 12. That's 3 entire months, I can't go into this being gone from day one for 3 months. Honestly, that's kind of the minimum for C. R. England. There is always the possibility of being able to go home to get your permit and see your family for a few hours but it's not even close to a guarantee....

Check out my company, Millis Transfer. School is 21 days and then you go out with a trainer for 15,000 miles. You can go home between school and going out with your trainer and you can work it out with your trainer to go home during your 15,000 miles. In total, it will be 3 weeks of school and anywhere from 4-6 weeks with your trainer... depending on how often you go home... before you go solo.

Once you go solo, If you you go OTR, you will need to be out at least 3 weeks at a time. If you go "regional," you will be home every weekend. In order to go regional, you will need to reside within a certain distance of one of our terminals.

You can use links here, on this site, to apply/start a conversation with Millis. Just be upfront about what you are able/willing to do and they will be honest/upfront with you.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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Looking for NEW TRUCKING HOME

HEY EVERYBODY ITS ME AGAIN Well out looking again for another job this time i finally don't care what trucks company have or how they are outfitted! I have found out APU'S,inverters, and a fridge is nothing compared to low pay and miles, and i can't eat a pretty truck, at THIS POINT I DON'T REALLY CARE IF THE TRUCK ONLY RUNS 60 MPH!

Before anyone jumps to judge me i have had one ticket in the last 3 yrs 7 mph over! no dot reportable accidents, no failed drug test or anything else to make me a risky hire! I am just tired of companies not keeping their part of our agreement, If they say i have to run 3 weeks at a time i'll do it with no complaints but when its time to go home i expect to get home(freight allowing) not being sent West from PA to new mexico while i live in GA 2 TO 3 DAYS BEFORE I'M SUPPOSE TO BE GOING HOME! I thought Marine recruiters could lie in the 70's but these truck recruiters have made it a new art form! I HAVE YET MET A FM,DM YET WITH ANY KIND OF BACKBONE OR HONOR! kNOWING i haven't met they all, but the few I have met leaves me thinking if i was in combat with them, can you say "friendly fire" . Ok bad joke!

All I want is the pay promised, and the hometime ASAP due to my location as promised, and no phone calls while i'm sleeping on my 10 hr dot break!

Looking at Heartland,barr-nun and jb hunt intermodal and a new company with only 3 trucks 7 sons out of georgia,maybe smaller would be better?

I'M old at 58 no longer is a mans word his bond it seems, I'm not looking to BE baby sitted but if keep my word i expect the same, (trying to get into heaven now-LOL)

I dont hang out in truck stops and only stop because of the gladly accepted 30 min rule! we drivers love so!

I'M NOT perfect and sometimes that old tymes MARINE shows his head, but leave me alone and let me drive and i'm as happy as a ------- in a pecker tree!

Anybody got any half descent leads, Don't worry I won't use your name. If your'e worried !

Well get some rest and be safe thanks

My company Millis will run you "regional," home every weekend, or OTR out of our Cartersville, GA terminal. I'm OTR and get home on time, or early, 99% of the time. If you don't get home as you requested, you get an extra 5 CPM until you're home.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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Equipment on truck

As a company driver, would you be able to purchase say a " in - motion satellite and have it mounted on the truck"? Naturally, paying for the install and the device. Just wondering if companies allow that..

Every Millis truck has a 24" flat screen, satellite dome and DirecTV subscription with NFL ticket, movie channels, etcetera. All free to the driver.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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Worst week of my life.

God bless, Big Scott.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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CR England or Pam?

Congratulations!

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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Petition for let make trucking driver fit again

The availability of a gym is not the reason most drivers are out of shape. Nothing is preventing drivers from exercising. More government involvement is seldom the best solution to problems. Personal responsibility is the key.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

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First Year Completed, 127,028 Miles

Wonder what millis' cpm is, new rookie.

Base pay scale is on the Millis site, https://millistransfer.com/experienced-drivers/pay-scale.

You start at 42 CPM. Plus, the performance bonus is an extra 3, 4 or 5 cents per mile if you drive 2000, 2500 or 3000 miles per week. So, starting out its 45-47 CPM as long as you drive at least 2,000 miles per week.

We also get a 1 CPM safety bonus, paid annually, and a 10 cents per gallon fuel bonus, paid monthly, for each gallon purchased according to the fuel solutions they send with each load.

That is, if you fuel where they suggest you fuel, 80% of the time, they pay you 10 cents per gallon. It's just about always a Loves or a Pilot, on their suggest route. I have found it pretty easy to be 80% compliant. Especially in light of the fact that if their route is not your route, you can simply request a fuel solution that matches your route.

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