Profile For Soulin H.

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    2 years, 3 months ago

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Posted:  1 week, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

Hi all. I passed all the DMV tests!dancing-dog.gifdancing-banana.gif

The instructors were helpful. I was able to get it correct how to read the air pressure gauges.

I admit I was stressing a bit over it but I got over it and put my head into it.

Thanks to everyone that chimed-in.thank-you.gif

Here is the photo of the same gauge that I added some lines and psi numbers to illustrate. I just did the best I could with the Microsoft paint program, did not use a micrometer smile.gif so the lines are not 'exact' but as some have said here (thanks to those that did say) does not have to be dead-on exact. Close enough to the 'exact' reading and knowing the parameters for each particular test is what matters to pass. Also to be closer to 'exact', one pointer needle width at the tip of the needle is about 1 psi. I did when I read the gauge end up saying the reading is 104 psi because that is where it was pointing about 1 pointer needle width lower than right on the 105 psi line.

0421109001539399583.jpg

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

shocked.png OK I got it wrong again! sorry.gif Center of blue segments between 90 and 120; center of first segment (above 90) is 97 1/2 psi second segment center between the black line and 120 is 112 1/2 psi. etc.... ...I think anywaygood-luck-2.gif

I am not going to post here again until I pass all my DMV tests scheduled for next week and am waiting for CDL to come in the mail.

I am going to focus on all what I need to to pass the DMV tests for my CDL.

To all who undoubtedly have said something of my error/s, thanks even though I have not read any more posts and will not be answering them directly at this point in time because I will be taking a break from most computer things for the next week so I can do what I must in order to pass DMV Pre-Trip, Air Brakes, Skills, and Driving tests the first time.

Thanks everyone for your so very valuable input.

BTW, FWIW, I just want to pass the tests at DMV, I could care less about a 'Cigar'.smile.gif

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

Re what I just said:

For the DMV test, if the needle is right at center of a red or a blue segment, I will say whatever even number it would be;

OK, I know, I made a 'technical' error; I should have said:

For the DMV test, if the needle is right at center of a red or a blue segment, I will say whatever whole number it would be;...

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

Oh man......that's some unfortunate math right there! No wonder you're unhappy about this gauge.

Thanks for trying.......but no cigar

embarrassed.gif I know. Anyway I should have said 1/2 way between 90 psi and 120 psi is 105 psi.

And yes; No Cigar!rofl-3.gif

I did ask my instructors about it. As has been said here, the reading of the gauge is important and close enough (IOW, will not have to be absolutely 'exact') in all likelihood will be close enough to pass a DMV test.

Also, as has been said here, and adamantly emphasized and insisted by my instructors, the correct psi ranges for each test must be verbalized to the DMV tester.

As I study the photo of the gauge I notice that one needle width is about 1 psi.

Increments of 30 can be evenly divided by 6 to find where the the 5 psi increments are.

There are red and blue segments that are separated by a black line centered between the numbers on the gauge. The black line is the 3rd 5 psi increment between the numbers (15 psi above and below the numbers).

The center of each red or blue segment would be about 7 1/2 psi (which is what made it more confusing to me).

For the DMV test, if the needle is right at center of a red or a blue segment, I will say whatever even number it would be; example: 117 psi for (saying) needles have settled @ (117 psi) when preforming the Air Compressor Governor Cut-In Test if the needle on gauge is center of the 'higher' psi segment between 120 and 90. I will not bother saying 117 1/2 psi.

I am am sure I have it correct enough for DMV test now.smile.gif

Thanks to everyone for your input.thank-you.gif

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

BTW, FWIW, Re:

Yeah, this guy is gonna be a real treat to deal with. Wait until he gets on the road one-on-one isolated with his first mentor. He's gonna give one or two smartass remarks like that and on the second day find himself sitting on the side of the road hitching a ride..

good-luck.gif Not going to happen.smile.gif

Thanks (Raptor) You did miss one though.. ...Not meaning to be a "smrtass"... ...just saying:

Check Rate of Air Pressure Buildup To perform this test, the engine must be running at normal operating idle, typically 600–900 rpms. Observe the air gauge to determine if the pressure builds at the proper rate. For dual air systems, the pressure should build from approximately 85 to 100 psi within 45 seconds.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

1 Re:

You are not being tested on whether you not you can read the gauge,

Actually the instructors at my school have said to me and other students otherwise. They would disagree with that statement.

Re:

Soulin, aside from my mistake, you were given the correct answer.

Yes Old School, I realize most of the answers here have been correct. I was not referring to your so humbly admitted incorrect answer.

Re:

You just can't let it get the best of you in this job. Very few things are perfectly accurate in this career. You will discover that no two trucks air compression systems act identically....

... Try to relax and not drive yourself crazy by overthinking the details. This probably sounds unprofessional to you now, but about three years into this career you'll understand me. Of course, if you think I'm crazy now, and continue stressing over the minutiae, you'll never last three years in this job. It will drive you nuts.

Thanks Old School; your points well taken, I understand. Even though I am as of yet inexperienced in the trade, I do agree with that and have life's experience with many other things that same advise; would be wise to take for sure.

I have been reading posts on this website for a couple of years now and have been absorbing the informative info that is so graciously given by so many here. It is one of the things that weighed-in for my decision to follow through and get my Class A CDL.

Re:

Your on a forum full of people who have already passed this test and your going to claim we can't help you with "Thanks for trying....But no cigar"??????

Plan B, 1- My humble apology for appearing to be smug and ungrateful with my mannerism regarding the "no cigar" comment.sorry.gif 2- I very much acknowledge your honest good advice. I do appreciate the photo of the gauge and your support and mention that my situation is not in the least bit unique.

Re:

Step one is simply checking for leaks. Your holding the brake down while listening for leaks and making sure the pressure does not continue to drop while you are doing so.

That test is called the "Applied Leakage" test and is for the "Service Brakes" (according to CA Manual and my instructors.) In in my school that would be step 3 but most probably could be step 1. That is just not the way I am being instructed here.

At the DMV the wording we use must be accurate. I have already have shown where by using the literal verbatim of what the CA DMV refers to as the "Static Leakage Test" as. It is for the parking and emergency brake systems which must not loose more than 3 psi after the air pressure gauges "stabilize" and in exactly 1 minute (using the tractor towing a single trailer with air brake system that we have to test in at DMV anyway.

Re:

Mr/Mrs Evaluator I am going to pump down on the brake pedal until the warning light and buzzer come on at or before 60psi."

Here we have to be 100% accurate with what the minimum and maximum (range) where the "low Air Pressure Warning" light and/or buzzer come/s on. The range here in CA is a minimum of 55 psi and a maximum of 75 psi. That being said, on the trucks that we practice on in the yard and the test truck, yes the low air pressure warning system initiates at ~ 60 psi.

BTW, FWIW, I am now quite (and have been for a few weeks now) familiar with the "Spring Brake Pop-Out" test... ...(minimum 20 psi and maximum of 45 psi... ...Also, FWIW, all of the air brake test pressure ranges and steps. I was just asking here if anyone would have a specific way to read the gauge I posted a photo of, not much more other than asking wtf-2.gif why anyone would make such a gauge like that (with intervals of 30 psi instead of 10 psi) in the first place.

Re:

Yeah, this guy is gonna be a real treat to deal with. Wait until he gets on the road one-on-one isolated with his first mentor. He's gonna give one or two smartass remarks like that and on the second day find himself sitting on the side of the road hitching a ride.....with no cigar.

OK Brett. I think you may be exaggerating just a wee bit on that 'second day on the road' comment. I did not realize that some would take it that way regarding my no cigar comment gee wiz!

Now I think no matter what way I explain the why I said (meant) that contextually some here would likely say that I am making excuse for what you have decided is a "smartass' remark. I just assume get back on track of the topic instead of getting so offtrack about differing ways that the 'no cigar' comment was supposedly intended by me to contextually mean... ...OK it was a smartass remark.sorry.gif

I will I will do my best and hopefully will not be making any more 'smartass-like comments here.good-luck-2.gif

That being said, I do appreciate the wealth of information on this website and hope that I can contribute in some way in the future, or maybe something that I already asked and the answers that were or will be generated in the future have been or will be helpful to someone anyway.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

The main point of the testing, is that you know how to verbalize the correct information to the officer while you're demonstrating the proper steps to take the test. They are already expecting you to show up in a properly inspected truck that's in good working order. They just want to see you demonstrate the test properly, and verbalize the information correctly.

Thanks Old School. That is the most accurate and truthful 'answer' I have read here for this topic and is what my instructors have been saying all along. As of yet, I have not read any posts beyond the one the quote above is from yet.

As for my instructors' they have been very informative and have answered every question I have asked. Yes, I have asked about the air pressure gauges. The answers I have gotten regarding that so far have not been specific but were general about having to 'learn' the increments; And yes, there is a worded 'script' we are supposed to remember for the Air Brake Test at the DMV.

It's only a sixty second test. Relax, you don't need single psi increments to look at. You'll know if it's working properly without having to get all anal with the details.

rofl-3.gif LOL!! More paranoia than anal.smile.gif

I am just looking for accurate answers regarding the specific gauge I have to test with. I have received mostly 'accurate' answers and good advice here; (thanks to all for that). There has been at least 1 incorrect answer, Re: "Static Leakage Test"; for example:

For the static leakage test your basically just watching to make sure the needle doesn't continue to drop as your holding the brake.

, ...But, no answers specific to the gauge I am asking about.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

RE:

You are way over thinking this. The gauge is set up for the numbers you need. 90, compressor comes on. 120, compressor cuts off. 60, warning buzzer comes on. 30, valves should pop.

Actually not. CA CDL Manual says:

"*Air Compressor Governor Cut-In Pressure Test To perform this test, the air pressure for the vehicle cannot be rising when the engine is running. With the air pressure at maximum pressure (cut-out), begin slowly pumping the brake pedal to reduce the air tank pressure. Watch the air pressure gauge between pumps to identify when the compressor cuts-in (needle starts to rise). This must occur no lower than 85 psi for a bus, and no lower than 100 psi for trucks."

Just as vague as the one you posted.

Sure is albeit different and a 2-in-one single gauge. The one in the photo I took is just the primary, the secondary is exactly same except it has the number 2 instead of the number 1 on it.

For the static leakage test your basically just watching to make sure the needle doesn't continue to drop as your holding the brake.

It is a definite fail at the DMV on the Air Brake Test to press the "Service Brake" and reefer to it as the "Static Leakage Test".

Pressing the "Service Brake" and holding it down steady for 1 minute is the "Applied Leakage Test" on the "Service Brakes".

California DMV CDL Handbook says:

"Test Air Leakage Rate There are 2 tests as follows: Static Leakage Test With a basically fully-charged air system (within the effective operating range for the compressor), turn off the engine, release all brakes, and let the system settle (air gauge needle stops moving). Time for one minute. The air pressure should not drop more than: • 2 psi for single vehicles. • 3 psi for a combination of 2 vehicles. • 5 psi for a combination of 3 or more vehicles. Important: The maximum air loss rate for a combination of 2 or more vehicles is 2 psi if the towed vehicles are not equipped with air brakes. An air loss greater than those listed above, indicate a problem in the braking system and repairs are needed before operating the vehicle.

*Applied Leakage Test

To perform this test, the vehicle’s air pressure should be built up to maximum pressure (cut-out). With the air pressure built up, shut off the engine, chock the wheels if necessary, release the parking brake (all vehicles) and the tractor protection valve (combination vehicle), and firmly apply the foot brake. Then hold the foot brake for 1 minute after stabilization of the air gauge. Check the air gauge to see that the air pressure drops no more than 3 psi in 1 minute (single vehicle) or 4 psi in 1 minute (combination vehicle) and listen for air leaks. You must identify how much air the system lost and verbalize the maximum air loss rate allowed for your vehicle. • 3 psi for single vehicles. • 4 psi for a combination of 2 vehicles. • 6 psi for a combination of 3 or more vehicles. Important: The maximum air loss rate for a combination of 2 or more vehicles is 3 psi if the towed vehicles are not equipped with air brakes. An air loss greater than those listed above, indicates a problem in the braking system and repairs are needed before operating the vehicle. Note: For testing purposes, you must be able to demonstrate this test and verbalize the allowable air loss for your vehicle. If the air loss is too much, check for air leaks and fix any that are identified. For testing purposes, identify if the air loss rate is too much.

Just sayin.

Anyway I was hoping for someone who has experience with the specific gauge scale as what I have to test with to chime-in.

Thanks to all for trying... ... sorry.gif But no cigar

Posted:  3 weeks, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Help! How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?

I will be taking my DMV Driving Test in a few days. My question/s: The main question is in the topic: "How is anyone supposed to 'accurately" read an Air Pressure gauge like this one?"

Why would anyone make a gauge with 30 psi increments instead of the standard 10 psi?

It seems to me so absurd! 1/2 way between 90 and 120 is 115 for example, but a driver is supposed to be able to 'accurately' read 3 psi for the Static Leakage Test after, of course, 'accurately' reading the air pressure after the readings on the gauges have 'stabilized'.

On this gauge, where exactly is 100 psi, or 85 psi?... ...what about 140 psi?... ...or 20, and 45 psi?... ...etc.

0285216001538269056.jpg

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

10/2 Sleeper Berth 'Exception' / How to use and stay 'legal'

Thanks Rainy D. and Old School for sharing your useful and informative info.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

10/2 Sleeper Berth 'Exception' / How to use and stay 'legal'

I am still in Truck Driving School. My school is emphasizing pre-trip, air brake, and skills to pass the California DMV Class A CDL for Combination vehicles.

My question is about the 'exception' [HOS] (regarding FEDERAL (Interstate commerce):

In the handbook it says:

"After driving for 11 hours or being on duty for 14 hours, you may not drive again until you have had 10 consecutive hours off duty."

OK, so far that seems straight forward enough to me and is totally understandable. The following is confusing and seems riddled with possible inadvertent HOS violations in the making just waiting to bite an inexperienced driver in the hind quarter if not well enough informed and able to decipher just how to stay 'legal' and still use the 'exception' (correctly to be 'legal').

Exception: If the truck is equipped with a sleeper berth, these 10 hours may be broken up into 2 periods provided one is not less than 8 hours."

What does it mean? The way the rule is stated seems vague to me and does not make sense or have any explanation or examples in the handbook how to use it. How does it effect the next day of on duty?

What is the 'next day' of 'on duty', where/when can it start legally'? What can one do (to stay 'legal') when near either the end of the 7/60 or 8/70 HOS near the end of the 'work week'?

IOW, how can this 'Exception' be utilized?

Could some of the seasoned drivers please explain some ways to use it and show examples of what the HOS log would actually look like when that 'exception' is used in different circumstances?

Posted:  3 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Question: employability prospects with physical lifting limitations?

Thanks Old School.

RE:

Soulin, are you aware of the Paid CDL Training Programs?

These are a great way to get yourself started in this career.

Most of them will provide your training, transportation, meals, and housing while at their program. You then agree to work for them for one year. These are some of the best ways to get started in my opinion. There's no reason you couldn't earn 40,000 dollars or more during your rookie year.

Yes, I am aware of 'paid' company training.

My situation is somewhat unique. I don't want to get into the fine details about why here on this forum. I have been investigating my options for about a year and came to the conclusion that my only reasonable chance to successfully get a Class A CDL and a good shot at being hired is me utilizing DOR sponsorship and a private school who has years long experience working with DOR that also has a good success record of their graduates from the DOR sponsorship land actual god Class A and other CDL driving jobs through their recommendations to companies who give consideration to new Class A CDL licensees directly out of that particular school to drivers who the same companies would never consider investing in for their companies' Class A CDL training in the first place.

It is a foot-in-the-door for me.

Albeit I may be mistaken with this line of thinking, but it seems to me that In the companies' eyes, someone else already made the CDL schooling investment so they did not have to make that investment. The 'graduate' already has Class A CDL in-hand and the 'graduate' has been recommended by the already known school.

There is no reason the company could not have the new driver sign a minimal time working contract anyway so the company could justify it's investment in the company specific training. I would be good with something like that; a 1 year contract with a well established company would be really good.

I am sure I will land a good Class A CDL driver job. I won't stop trying until I land that Class A CDL OTR position.

Soulin H.

Posted:  3 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Question: employability prospects with physical lifting limitations?

Jason R., thanks for your answer.

Most freight is no touch, I would recommend staying away from tanker because there is lifting and climbing in some of those positions. I would suggest van/Reefer because 99% of the companies are no touch due to the work comp liability.

That is what I was expecting. The video I mentioned with the "horizontal pull" test and several others from shipping companies and some rehabilitation testing videos for job placement have made me a little concerned about my prospects of actually getting hired.

What you have said makes sense.

I just don't have any actual knowledge of how many Shippers that hire new Class A CDL drivers will unequivocally require driver to pass a "horizontal pull" test like the one I mentioned. I suspect many will test for that. I just don't know exactly what to anticipate.

I would suggest van/Reefer because 99% of the companies are no touch due to the work comp liability.

Makes sense to me... ...That was and still is my thinking...

...Anyway, there has to be a reason a company has for a requirement for new CDL drivers to pass the "horizontal pull" test.

I am guessing here:

After pondering the previous answers on this website and thinking about it; It occurs to me that Schnider owns many if not all the trailers they haul (at least the dry/van ones that are mentioned on their website); I suspect it is like that for many of the large-scale shipping companies, (I really do not know)... ...Whereas they have to get cargo unloaded ASAP to minimize the turnaround time and not having to wait for a 'lumper' to get the cargo unloaded from their dry/van trailers if there is no way other than a hand truck or manual pallet jack and their driver available at the time.... ...So, I guess that some companies may require their drivers to be able to do at least some of the loading/unloading in some (hopefully) infrequent situations which could require the company driver to use a hand pallet jack to manage the cargo in some way.

Soulin H.

Posted:  4 months ago

View Topic:

Question: employability prospects with physical lifting limitations?

Thanks for your answers Dustin J. And old school. Absolutely no criminal record whatsoever.

I don't even have any moving violations.smile.gif I was, for over 30 years, a shade-tree mobile auto mechanic and also did miscellaneous odd-jobs and processed firewood (hence the spine injuries and lifting limitations).

Between the spine injuries and resulting arthritis pain, etc., I had to stop auto mechanic and other physical work that involved particular body positions and lifting. It just got to the point that getting up and down on the ground so many times a day (Had no car lift) and leaning over in the engine compartment and the heavy labor intensive work I was doing when I was not doing mechanic work just got to my back and my state of mind.

Anyway, after all the professional medical help, therapy, etc. and of course perhaps most importantly self retrospect, I am ready to get CDL and on the road. I will be very glad and grateful to have the opportunity to meet the challenges ahead that being Class A CDL OTR will invariably dish-out.

I am more confident than ever and am older and wiser too. I am certain that I am ready, willing, and able to, at a bare minimum, become a very good and safe Class A Truck Driver, and, more likely become excellent at OTR truck Driving. I am willingly motivated.

Anyway, please excuse my 'blather'. Thanks once again for your input.

Soulin H.

Posted:  4 months ago

View Topic:

Question: employability prospects with physical lifting limitations?

Hello to all. This is my 1st time posting here. I have been exploring this website for over a year now and I do really appreciate the information that is shared here.

After looking into a career change and examining the options that are now available to me I decided that Truck Driving would be the best for me. After I pass the DOT physical and vision, (I know I will pass those), I will be going to a private CDL school in Southern California for Class A within the next month.

I am physically a small framed man in my late 50s.

I have been licensed to drive since I was 18 and have an excellent driving record, although never had any CDL licenses of any kind, no kids, spouse, pets or dependents either.

I intend to start Truck Driving as OTR. I will not be trying for flatbed because lifting the heavy tarps is obviously more than I can handle by myself.

I am considering limiting my OTR job considerations mostly towards either Dry Van or refer.

I would consider non-hazmat tanker; IE: water, food-grade or maybe something else that does not need to be placarded as a hazmat if I get 'desperate' for temporary work. If I get really 'desperate' for work, I would also consider double dump truck for regional road construction for aggregate or other non-hazmat loads. Not into livestock, manure or 'honey wagon'.

I know there are Truck Driving jobs that do not require the driver to load and/or unload the cargo with their back.

As a 'rookie', I know that I cannot be too picky and be successful. I just want to avoid biting-off more than I can chew, so to speak... ... I have operated forklifts and can easily learn whatever is required to be certified for anything like that which is directly related to a Truck Driving job, (I am not getting the class A CDL to become a forklift operator!).

I do have some concerns about my 'employability' in the Truck Driving trade:

1st some background: I am being sponsored to go to CDL school by the California state Department of rehabilitation (DOR); (I passed the preliminary physical and psychological examinations required by DOR which I had to pass before DOR would sponsor me to go on to the next step; the DOT examinations.

I did not pass the heavy lifting/sliding 100 pound load across the floor (also; for example: called a "horizontal pull" test by Schnider in their "Pre-work Screen for Truck Drivers at Schnider" YouTube video)... ...But that is just a physical limitation that has to be factored-in and does not preclude me from DOR sponsorship or going to CDL school and getting my Class A CDL.

My most immediate concern after getting the Class A CDL is: ...Even though I may be able to do everything else, I will not likely ever pass a "horizontal pull" test like the one I previously mentioned.

I can load/unload a limited quantity of cargo within the 50lb test limit that the DOR test I passed had required me to do, and I can do what it takes to mount snow chains on tractor-trailer size wheels etc.. The chains on an 18 wheeler would be right at my maximum physical ability level.

Anyway, those are the physical limitations I do have to work with that I am most concerned about. I can do some gym to increase my stamina so I could load/unload more quantity at a faster rate, but not to increase the working weight-limit load beyond what I have already established.

Does anyone have any good advise on what to do and say to a perspective employer?... ...Also, any advice on choosing Truck Driving job descriptions for specific things to look for to pinpoint a good job prospect?... ...Also, specifically, what to avoid so as not to waste anybody's time?... ...or, should I just try all companies I would otherwise consider trying without considering my 'physical limitations' and just go from there?.. ...Or?

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