Profile For Mary H.

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    2 years, 4 months ago

Mary H.'s Bio

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Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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School or pick a company? And how do I choose between company driver or owner operator?

95% of the time when I find drivers complaining about not getting their due it is directly related to their lack of understanding about the steps that must be taken to get detention pay or whatever else it is that they think is not getting paid to

Well, maybe a thread in which you lay out all of those steps would be very helpful. But, I will point out in advance that none of these companies qualify their promises to pay with a - "to our top tier drivers, only" - statement.

Since you are doing all this research into the history of the drivers on this board why not dig into my history. You may just learn the secrets of success.

Success is subjective, of course. But, I will make over 70K this year, sleep at home and spend a few hours with loved ones, every day, and be off 2 days a week. And, I get paid for pretty much everything I do from the moment I get to my truck 'til I shut it down. In my book, that's not bad for a truck-driver.

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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School or pick a company? And how do I choose between company driver or owner operator?

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I don't need to prove myself.

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Josephus, there's not a reason in the world you need to listen to us. Other than the fact that we have had extreme success at this. You can wallow in your unrealistic expectations all you want, even deny they exist, but paying just a little attention to people who genuinely want to help you would help you tremendously.

Sir,

Recently, another poster cited the company's failure to pay detention pay, as they say in writing that they do, as one reason he is considering moving on to another company.

Another poster, Gladhand, is considering quitting OTR driving for his company because of long delays at shippers/receivers, presumably not paid as the company claimed to pay. Another poster, Charlie Mac, quit OTR driving with the same company for the same reason.

I say that most drivers become disgruntled because they believe they are not be compensated fairly for all of the time they put in on the companies behalf.

You seem to want to shield these companies from any and all criticism.

IT IS NOT UNREASONABLE TO EXPECT TO BE PAID AS THE COMPANY PROMISED, WHETHER IN WRITING ON THEIR WEBSITE, OR THRU THEIR REPRESENTATIVE RECRUITER.

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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Stay with Roehl? Or go elsewhere???

Giff,

If you're considering leaving Roehl for another of the large truckload carriers, I concur with all the others - don't do it. The grass isn't likely to be any greener. But, when you get over your wanderlust, consider some sort of "local" truck driving job to get away from some of those frustrations you speak of and make top earnings. However, if you are ever certain that you want to move on to another company, the sooner the better, for the same reason Errol gives. You'll be starting over at the bottom.

I worked for one of the largest truckload carriers many years ago and I still remember the frustration (rage) I felt at times because of some of the things you mentioned. If a company says they pay detention ($10 for each 30 minutes after two hours, according to their website), then it is not an "unreasonable expectation" to be paid just that, each and every time it happens. You are a company driver, waiting to get loaded/unloaded on the company's behalf and you should be paid just as they promised.

Should you choose to read a book, or watch tv, or take a nap, while the time passes is irrelevant. And, whether you log it on-duty or off is also irrelevant.

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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Orientation at western express

So I just passed my cdl test and graduate on December 9th I talked to Western Express and they want me to leave on Sunday does any one have any recent experience with them I kind of want to know what to expect also do they do hair follicle testing? I am a bit worried about it but should pass if they do it just curious to see what I can expect with them I have seen not one positive review with them which makes me very nervous about committing with them . Any feedback would be greatly appreciated Thanks in advance

Hi Eric,

Just curious. Why aren't you talking to other companies? I'm not knocking them, but Western Express is one of those companies considered to be a "second chance" company - a place that hires folks with background issues that prevent them from getting hired by many of the other companies. That second chance usually comes at the cost of lower pay. I think Old School can tell you that Western wasn't his first choice. Have you applied to other companies?

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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Your 1st interview, how did it go?

For my current job, that has higher hiring standards, it was a normal interview, with many of those lame, discomforting questions that we all hate. Just stay calm, and be sincere. It's not so much what you say as how you say it.

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Your 1st interview, how did it go?

Greetings everyone,

I am asking of you to take a trip down memory lane and try to remember that first interview you underwent for your first real trucking job. Although I am many weeks away from finding myself in this scenario I do like to research before hand and try to visualize myself going through the motions.

So, let's say you are a recent grad w/ CDL A in hand and no experience. How does the interview go? I am sure it's by phone but with smart phones being prevalent can SKYPEing or iPhone FACETIME be implemented as a way of providing a more intimate interview experience? What are some standard type questions and can you remember and left-field questions that caught on off guard?

For the big truckload carrier I started with, many years ago, it was not really that type of interview. They just asked me straightforward questions about my background, work history, motor vehicle record, criminal history, etc.. None of those make you squirm, "what are your 3 biggest weaknesses," type questions.

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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.12cpm? Huh?

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Who is offering .12 ????

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Florida Freight. They're a third chance company. Team drivers are paid .06 cpm, but they split the miles....

They also lease, but require the title to your home as a security deposit.

sign me up!

Posted:  2 years, 3 months ago

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Anybody left a higher paying job in corporate America for trucking? How did it work out for you?

It will take you several years to even approach 70 K. Also, this job comes with its own unique stresses. I'm 56 years old, divorced, grown Children. From my experience so far, I can see how this job would be tough on a marriage and family. Do your research

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Also, keep in mind that you will work many more hours as an OTR driver than you do in your corporate job to earn an equivalent amount of money. I'm guessing that your current job is basically 8 to 5, weekends off, like most "corporate" jobs. To earn 70K as an OTR driver, you will likely be away from home for weeks at a time, working upwards of 80 hours per week. If you consider how much you earn on an hourly basis, you will be taking a big pay cut if you leave your current position to become an OTR truck driver. I don't know you personally, but I doubt that this would be a good move for you at this stage of your life with a young family.

Truck driving is good for some people. Those of us that are misfits in the "corporate" workplace, restless souls, loners, rebels, etc., and it's good for people with background issues that make them unemployable in other occupations with similar earnings potential.

Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Best trucking companies

Great answer! Spoken like a true diplomat!

I feel your pain, re. the approaching peak season. New hires at my company have to sign an acknowledgement that they may be required to work every day from Thanksgiving thru Christmas - and they mean it. I worked 40 days straight last year.

Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Possible Career Transition

Miss Mary, you deserves some dancing bananas! dancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gif

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Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Best trucking companies

Mary replied:

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Walmart Private Fleet requires minimum three years of OTR experience and a clean driving record.

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Here's what their website says:

Minimum qualifications for Walmart drivers: Interstate (Class A) Commercial Drivers License with Hazmat endorsement (including cleared background check) OR will obtain Hazmat endorsement (with cleared background check) within 120 calendar days of date of hire. Minimum of 30 months experience working in a full-time Class A tractor/trailer driving position in the previous 3 years. No more than two (2) moving violations while operating a personal or commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No serious traffic violations while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No convictions for a DUI, DWI, OUI, or reckless driving involving alcohol/drugs within the last ten (10) years. No preventable accidents* while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No preventable* DOT recordable accidents (collisions resulting in disabling damage and/or immediate medical treatment away from the scene) while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last ten (10) years. No preventable accident* resulting in a fatality or catastrophic injury in driving history (commercial motor vehicle).

But I would guess that they are extremely choosy and that they usually hire well above the minimum requirements.

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Thanks for including that Mary. They must have relaxed their minimums a bit. 30 months equate to 2.5 years, so it's still close to 3. Your last sentence though is highly relevant...

It's a highly coveted job, lots of applicants for WMPF to choose from.

I am assigned to a Walmart Grocery DC, 7030 in Gordon PA. been there as a Swift Dedicated driver for over 3 years. Walmart regularly plucks the cream off the top of the Swift driver pool and hires them into their Private Fleet. The transition is smooth because the job is basically the same, except their drivers will float from DC to DC depending on where the demand is. At least for the folks I personally know who WMPF hired, they all had 3 or more years on the account (one guy had 5). Of the 5 I know of, 4 of them are still there (the 5th just retired), basically doing the same work/deliveries I am doing. Overall a really great job...definitely one of the best fleets to work for, lots of perks. Several of the WMPF drivers domiciled at 7030 have over 1 million accident free miles, one has over 3 million and another is the current National Truck Rodeo champ. Cool place to work.

As for me, I thoroughly enjoy running dedicated for Walmart as a Swift driver. At least for now, it meets all of my needs as a driver (personally and professionally), provides an opportunity for flexibility, variety of work assignments (that supplement the base CPM), I am not treated like a number, and a voice directly to the terminal manager.

As coveted as those jobs are, it's a wonder that WalMart spends so much money running radio ads that they're hiring.

So, pardon my nosiness, but is that "the one" job that you'd leave Swift for???

Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Best trucking companies

Walmart Private Fleet requires minimum three years of OTR experience and a clean driving record.

Here's what their website says:

Minimum qualifications for Walmart drivers: Interstate (Class A) Commercial Drivers License with Hazmat endorsement (including cleared background check) OR will obtain Hazmat endorsement (with cleared background check) within 120 calendar days of date of hire. Minimum of 30 months experience working in a full-time Class A tractor/trailer driving position in the previous 3 years. No more than two (2) moving violations while operating a personal or commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No serious traffic violations while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No convictions for a DUI, DWI, OUI, or reckless driving involving alcohol/drugs within the last ten (10) years. No preventable accidents* while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last three (3) years. No preventable* DOT recordable accidents (collisions resulting in disabling damage and/or immediate medical treatment away from the scene) while operating a commercial motor vehicle in the last ten (10) years. No preventable accident* resulting in a fatality or catastrophic injury in driving history (commercial motor vehicle).

But I would guess that they are extremely choosy and that they usually hire well above the minimum requirements.

Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Best trucking companies

What are good trucking companies to work for after completing my first year experience at my starter company

Walmart is running radio ads saying that they are hiring experienced drivers and that their first year drivers make over 82K plus great benefits and home-time. So, that might be one to shoot for.

There are certain local driving positions that are highly sought after by some experienced drivers. For instance, some of the LTL companies offer outstanding pay and benefits. Also, local fuel hauling usually pays well with good benefits. Earnings greater than 90K/yr are attainable in each of these with a few years experience.

Posted:  2 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Possible Career Transition

Hello Rui,

I am a long-time lurker here, too, but also an experienced driver. I've actually had 2 driving careers. The first was back in the '90's when I was 20-something. Like you, I started to feel more and more detached from my current job and driving truck seemed like a great way to escape from the everyday drudgery of the office. And, it was a great escape, for me!

My first trucking job was with one of the "mega" truckload carriers. They had a school of their own, which I attended, and then I worked for them for one year, honoring the commitment I had made in exchange for the training they provided. I made about $36,000 that year, which was about average for first year drivers at that company. I was safe and reliable, but I didn't push too hard. I wasn't in it for the money so much as the lifestyle. I would say that nowadays you could make anywhere from the 35 to 55K driving over the road in your first year. It really just depends on how quickly you can learn to operate safely, efficiently and productively out there.

I quit that job after 1 year for personal reasons and pursued another line of employment for the next 20 years and then in my late 40's decided to go back to driving truck. This time I attended a private school and was able to land a "local" driving job right out of school. I am home every day, sleep in my own bed, and usually have 2 days off per week (sometimes only 1). I am paid hourly, average about 55 hours per week, and I made just shy of 70K in my first year.

My point in responding to you is that there is a wide range of opportunity for first year earnings as a driver. It depends what kind of job you pursue and how you perform, but anywhere from mid-30's to 70K is possible.

Living near Dallas, there is likely opportunity for you to land a "local" driving job right out of school, but I'm not sure if that is something you'd be interested in. It sounds more like you're leaning towards over the road driving. And, if you move to a remote part of Texas, then OTR will probably be your only option, anyway.

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