Profile For Heavy C

Heavy C's Info

  • Location:
    Portland, ME

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 9 months ago

Heavy C's Bio

Started life by just working at dead end jobs that I had no particular fun doing. Finally two years ago I got my CDL and haven't looked back. I drive for a company close to home and get to see my family almost daily. If you can't be happy doing this job then you're doing it wrong lol.

Heavy C's Photo Gallery

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Posted:  5 hours, 35 minutes ago

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I did it - I got my CDL!!!

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Posted:  1 day, 15 hours ago

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Question: Residential Areas

It may depend on the state or city guidelines, but I think in general, if the road isn't posted it's ok. However I wouldn't make a point of using them. Most will have signs that will say no through trucks, or local deliveries only. Whatever you do don't follow your GPS blindly. Western Express does this regularly at abroad near my companies warehouse. Instead of making the first right on Rumery Rd like you see in the picture, they take the second right onto Skillings. Which is residential and well posted for no trucks. But because it's technically the shorter route the GPS takes them that way. There's a telephone pole on that corner the city has to replace multiple times a year. Don't be that guy lol

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Posted:  1 day, 15 hours ago

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Automatics for Millenials?

My company has been on automatics exclusively for years now. The fuel savings alone has been tremendous. And I think you're over estimating the amount of "old guys" that would rather drive stick. Most of the old farts I work with prefer the autos. They're just tired of the stick.

Posted:  3 days, 18 hours ago

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Hey guys. It's been a while

Old school I get what you're saying. And I'm not saying I'm going to jump ship for sure or not. However I like to keep my options open, and also to see what other companies offer that could possibly benefit me or my family.

Now let explain my statement about the company. First off when I originally interviewed with this company, two things were made clear. One was that the drivers pick new schedules once a year which happens in November. Well already since I've been here my schedule has changed 5 times with hardly any notice. Which wreaks havoc on my family. You know with three small kids and a wife that also works full time. This last time the schedule changed I literally had one days notice. The second thing was yard jockey. I was told when I started that I would train on it but not be assigned to it because there's plenty of senior drivers that enjoy it. Well I spent 10 months of my first year doing yard. That's not what I signed up for.

About the management. First off all this company has been bought out two times in the last 7 years. Well the last buy out caused a lot of turmoil. The former head of transportation who had two decades of logistics experience and the respect of the drivers was fired. They replaced him with a woman with zero logistics experience. She happens to be the VP's daughter, hmmmm. Then there's the office and dispatch people. I won't even get into the problems with them. Then there's the pay structure. They use what's called inventive based pay. I have a sheet with two dozen categories of things I get paid on. Some things is hourly rate, other times it's mileage, and others it's flat rate. Well they don't know how to keep proper track of things so payroll is screwed up almost weekly.

The one bonus is the pay is the best I've had so far. I cleared 62k last year mostly doing jockey work. This year I'm on Pace for 75k. And the retirement is good.

But the scheduling is horrible for local work. Compared to otr it probably isn't bad, but there's no shortage of local work that has a more family friendly schedule.

I came here because this used to be THE place to work in Maine. Well even the veteran drivers with 30 plus years here say it used to be great but isn't anymore. At this point I'm just waiting to see if and when my wife gets her promotion and big pay increase, I won't have to worry about taking a little less money.

Posted:  4 days, 6 hours ago

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Hey guys. It's been a while

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Hey everyone. Glad to see this site is still going and doing well. Nice to see some of the same guys helping people out. I haven't been on in a while for lots of reasons but it's nice to be back.

So I'm still driving. I'm currently with Hannaford doing grocery delivery. Been here almost two years now. Pays well but the company is a mess. People in management positions that shouldn't be. That among many other things has me looking around. I've recently applied to FedEx. Anyone know anything about driving for them?

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i have an owner op friend in custom critical who loves it. each division is completely different, so Freight, Ground and Custom Critical are all run differently and the employees must apply all over again when changing divisions. they have different bonus structures and policies.

which division were you looking at? are you looking to go company or drive for a owner op? some positions require teams..such as the White Glove Reefer side.

I'm looking at the freight division. Company driver. They describe it as a road driver hauling doubles from terminal to terminal. Looks like thrid shift which is fine.

Posted:  4 days, 8 hours ago

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Hey guys. It's been a while

Hey everyone. Glad to see this site is still going and doing well. Nice to see some of the same guys helping people out. I haven't been on in a while for lots of reasons but it's nice to be back.

So I'm still driving. I'm currently with Hannaford doing grocery delivery. Been here almost two years now. Pays well but the company is a mess. People in management positions that shouldn't be. That among many other things has me looking around. I've recently applied to FedEx. Anyone know anything about driving for them?

Posted:  1 year, 9 months ago

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Northeast Regional

Welcome to Maine. The Walmart dc is real easy to get to. The unfortunate part is that it's in the dirty lew. Lock your truck when you get out. Its well known up here to be the arm pit of Maine. There's tons of places you can park overnight if needed. Try not to stay in that town if you can avoid it. There's a large truck stop off exit 80 in auburn which is not bad. There's others too if you're heading south. I'll give you some hints if you ever need them. Good luck

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Does anyone else call about bad driving?

I can't say that I've called about driving habits. I have called about faulty equipment when I couldn't reach them on the radio or through hand signals. Like the one guy hauling doubles at night and his rear trailer had no lights working.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Floating gears

I'll tell you what it was like for me. Anytime I went for a road test with a company I would ask the guy going it with me if he would mind if I floated. Every time I was told to just drive how I was comfortable. So if I felt better clutching then I could or if I liked floating they didn't mind either. I think most companies are under the assumption that the majority of drivers will float when on the road. They just want to make sure you make good decisions with their 100k dollar machine.

Hope this helps.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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What pays better

Hey pilot. Like old school said, I wouldn't believe it. That said though I have heard of some top Walmart drivers getting around six figures. I also talked to a driver for diversified automotive which is a leading auto hauler in the northeast. He told me he was close to getting six figures a few times. However working for them you have to provide your own insurance to cover damage to the vehicles. Plus you get paid based on the value of your loads. So if you haul mostly Honda fits your check will be a lot smaller than if you hauled more corvettes our Mercedes.

Let's just say if you plan on being a company driver then 40-60k sounds about right.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Log Trucks

Hey man I live here in Maine too. I've never personally done it but have talked to guys who have. First off you gotta be a maniac. Not sure if you've ever driven up in logging country but those guys drive with zero regard for safety. It's all about getting as many loads to the mill as possible. They'll let you run off into a ditch before they move over for you. You'll be expected to work in all weather and like someone said you'll have to chain up in terrible conditions including mud up to your waist. You'll be pulling extremely heavy loads. I've seen scale tickets of over 200k lbs. The rigs you're in aren't exactly pretty. They are older trucks with huge power plants and plenty of ground clearance.

You'll definitely want some experience first. However if you like getting dirty and a physically demanding job then it could be for you. Just be ready for some grueling work.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Advice

Adam I would also direct you to the CDL training diaries in the forums. You'll find lots of good stuff in there about people's experiences before, during, and after training. Plus you'll find things that people didn't do that they wish they did and things they did do but wish they didn't. And if you're not nervous about driving an 80k lbs missile then you must be crazy.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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90 degree ally dock

The key with any backing maneuver but especially ally dock is set up. Getting the proper set up meaning having your trailer far enough away from the pivot point so you don't clip it but also not push the trailer to far to the outside edge either. The other thing I would say is don't be scared to get that trailer jacked over. You really need to allow that trailer to turn into the spot. Lastly is all about timing. Learning the right time to start chasing the trailer in order to get the trailer even with the back cones but having the tractor still slightly angled can take practice.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Managing the blind-side back. (Consignees immediately off streets)

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This is one place I used to go regularly that it was easier to blind side and dam near impossible sight side back. So i would come over the bridge and block traffic then wait for the oncoming light to turn red and make a break for it. Sometimes you just get those situations where you just gotta do what you gotta do.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Managing the blind-side back. (Consignees immediately off streets)

Best thing is put your four ways on when approaching your entrance. That way the people behind you at least have a clue that your about to do something out of the ordinary. Wait for a sizeable break in oncoming traffic and begin your maneuver. Try to keep the gap in your lane small so as not to give the impression that the cars behind you should sneak by you. Although sometimes that's inevitable. Then just remember take your time and do what you need to do in order to make a safe back. People will probably get angry but try your best to ignore it.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Managing the blind-side back. (Consignees immediately off streets)

Currently it is a day cab. However that doesn't stop me from getting out and checking clearances. You can do what you would like and if it's company policy than definitely find a way to make a sight side back. Of course sight side is safer and easier. But you'll find that it's just not always possible or even realistic to back that way. So I won't shy away from it. This isn't some super trucker remark or sense of invisibility because I certainly have screwed up. As long as you take it slow and do the right steps you can blind side with no issues.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Managing the blind-side back. (Consignees immediately off streets)

Man I won't bother going and finding a place to turn around because you might not know where that is. Just wait for a decent break in traffic and block up the lanes. Then the hard part is remembering to take your time while all the people are getting ****ed at you. Just keep getting out and checking to see where you are at or better yet get a spotter from the place you're pulling in to.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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What is the hardest place you have ever maneuvered a truck through?

I live and drive in New England. Unfortunately most of the cities and towns around here were built before thinking about truck traffic. Boston itself is a miserable mess to try and maneuver around.

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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Game: you first felt like a real trucker when....

When I took to down some telephone wires with My trailer. Nothing says I'm a truck driver more than making a truck driving mistake lol

Posted:  1 year, 10 months ago

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How to best balance work and home?

Like CT said call every night. Or even better do a video chat. That way you can see your baby and they can see you. While talking though I would avoid talking about the road and the things you can see and accidents that you narrowly avoided. It just adds to your wife's stress level. Keep the focus on the baby and your wife. Do So your time OTR then land a sweet local gig and be home with your family! Good luck

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