Profile For ravenswood_65

ravenswood_65's Info

  • Location:
    Nampa, ID

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    Considering A Career

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    1 year, 12 months ago

ravenswood_65's Bio

American service veteran 63B10, LWVM, US Army Trainzer Likes hunting, boating, hiking, dog fancier

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Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

Oh, as for time-sensitive freight as perishables from California to New York with loads of fresh cherries and cheese?

There is the super fast jet-powered aviation industry with cargo planes that will get there in about 5 hours flat!

Remember inventors Orville and Wilbur Wright?

In a hurry to move it a LONG way? Call airline cargo and clipper service!

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

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Ravenswood wrote:

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My only DEMAND is a HUMAN lifestyle and perhaps the industry has not been yet tooled for that. I would hope that RAILROADS in America would basically obsolete OTR and even regional trucking altogether. Most freight on the concrete road would be the "last 50 miles" and regional trucking would be the norm and not the exception. Inter-modal , piggy-back and road-railers make the freight conversion from train to truck easy. Railroads, not OTR trucking, should move freight the longest distances over land.

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First of all, your overall expectations and perceptions of this industry are way out in "left field"; unreasonable, anecdotal, and juvenile.

Your above paragraph exemplifies just how little you know about the current state of rail/trucking transportation. Especially the blanket statement on the "last 50 miles"; a pipe dream at best. The rail to road conversion isn't as easy as you think,...dwell times in yards and transfers from train to train are cause for constant delays. Time sensitive loads are often moved in blocks of high priority freight that get's green lighted most of the time. Even perishables under the correct circumstances can be effectively moved by rail utilizing satellite tracking and real-time temperature monitoring.

To your suggestion, the railroads are already moving a significant number of trailers and containers. Have you ever spent any time trackside watching what is running? On average 40% of the current railroad business is intermodal on trains in excess of 6000 feet. Moving a trailer by rail must be mutually beneficial; cost/time effective for the shipper and profitable for the railroad. There are corridors and freight types where it makes sense and others where it doesn't. At times the decision is influenced by external factors like fuel prices and traffic, thus can change on a daily basis. It takes a trailer or container move by rail from the left coast to the right coast far longer than a driver team can accomplish the same task. Short moves less than 500 miles for the railroads are rarely profitable unless there is a premium price attached to the move (like UPS or FedEx).

The balance between what is moved by rail and what isn't is complicated and the conditions influencing it can change very quickly. There will always be a need for ORT trucking even if the railroads doubled current capacity (which they will not do because of freight volatility).

My suggestion to you Ravenswood is to either get serious about a trucking career, or like others have suggested stop trolling this forum with your ridiculous demands and notions. We are not here to entertain you...so please "buck-up" or move on.

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So, you have a college degree in industrial engineering?

I do know that a modern diesel freight train consumers only about 25% of the diesel fuel of an OTR truck comparing ton-mile of freight to ton mile of freight moved.

Large qualities of trucks on public highways are a safety menace to motor traffic and cause expensive damage to road asphalt which is footed by the American taxpayer.

I think freight should be transported in the most practical way possible.

One must consider:

1. public safety 2. environmental impact 3. costs to consumers and stakeholders 4. quality of life of those employed in transportation industries 5. potential for property damage: trucks are much more destructive than trains

You are married to your OTR truck as if she were your girlfriend and enjoy driving her to hell and gone until you die.

corrections: consumers should read consumes, qualities should read quantities

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

Ravenswood wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

My only DEMAND is a HUMAN lifestyle and perhaps the industry has not been yet tooled for that. I would hope that RAILROADS in America would basically obsolete OTR and even regional trucking altogether. Most freight on the concrete road would be the "last 50 miles" and regional trucking would be the norm and not the exception. Inter-modal , piggy-back and road-railers make the freight conversion from train to truck easy. Railroads, not OTR trucking, should move freight the longest distances over land.

double-quotes-end.png

First of all, your overall expectations and perceptions of this industry are way out in "left field"; unreasonable, anecdotal, and juvenile.

Your above paragraph exemplifies just how little you know about the current state of rail/trucking transportation. Especially the blanket statement on the "last 50 miles"; a pipe dream at best. The rail to road conversion isn't as easy as you think,...dwell times in yards and transfers from train to train are cause for constant delays. Time sensitive loads are often moved in blocks of high priority freight that get's green lighted most of the time. Even perishables under the correct circumstances can be effectively moved by rail utilizing satellite tracking and real-time temperature monitoring.

To your suggestion, the railroads are already moving a significant number of trailers and containers. Have you ever spent any time trackside watching what is running? On average 40% of the current railroad business is intermodal on trains in excess of 6000 feet. Moving a trailer by rail must be mutually beneficial; cost/time effective for the shipper and profitable for the railroad. There are corridors and freight types where it makes sense and others where it doesn't. At times the decision is influenced by external factors like fuel prices and traffic, thus can change on a daily basis. It takes a trailer or container move by rail from the left coast to the right coast far longer than a driver team can accomplish the same task. Short moves less than 500 miles for the railroads are rarely profitable unless there is a premium price attached to the move (like UPS or FedEx).

The balance between what is moved by rail and what isn't is complicated and the conditions influencing it can change very quickly. There will always be a need for ORT trucking even if the railroads doubled current capacity (which they will not do because of freight volatility).

My suggestion to you Ravenswood is to either get serious about a trucking career, or like others have suggested stop trolling this forum with your ridiculous demands and notions. We are not here to entertain you...so please "buck-up" or move on.

So, you have a college degree in industrial engineering?

I do know that a modern diesel freight train consumes only about 25% of the diesel fuel of an OTR truck comparing ton-mile of freight to ton mile of freight moved.

Large quantities of trucks on public highways are a safety menace to motor traffic and cause expensive damage to road asphalt which is footed by the American taxpayer.

I think freight should be transported in the most practical way possible.

One must consider:

1. public safety 2. environmental impact 3. costs to consumers and stakeholders 4. quality of life of those employed in transportation industries 5. potential for property damage: trucks are much more destructive than trains

You are married to your OTR truck as if she were your girlfriend and enjoy driving her to hell and gone until you die.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

Correction: LOCAL trucking, not REGIONAL trucking, would be the norm if rail freight were maximized, as much current truck freight, ton-miles, diverted to rail as practically possible

Which would create a HUGE demand for LOCAL drivers to my own rejoice.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

Correction: LOCAL trucking, not REGIONAL trucking, would be the norm if rail freight were maximized, as much current truck freight, ton-miles, diverted to rail as practically possible

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

Ravenswood....most of your posts are about what drivers want and whether we should be concerned about self driving trucks. Did you ever wonder WHY the companies want self driven trucks?

Maybe because some drivers have ridiculous demands. These trucks are our jobs...not our residence. Yes I live on my truck, but it is not mine. It is a company vehicle in which I have been given really good amenities to make my life easier. You seem to think it is a living space first, and a corporate asset last.

I keep wondering why you are some spending so much time constantly criticizing an industry which many of us love. Why are you here if you are so critical of trucking?

My only DEMAND is a HUMAN lifestyle and perhaps the industry has not been yet tooled for that. I would hope that RAILROADS in America would basically obsolete OTR and even regional trucking altogether. Most freight on the concrete road would be the "last 50 miles" and regional trucking would be the norm and not the exception. Inter-modal , piggy-back and road-railers make the freight conversion from train to truck easy. Railroads, not OTR trucking, should move freight the longest distances over land.

Railroads can easily be made to run autonomously because the train vehicles are rail-guided and switches can be machine-operated remotely.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

I have a tremendous idea.....all companies should just use daycabs but provide rooms at the nearest Hilton every day for drivers to take our 10hr breaks. We should also be provided dining at a 5 star restaurant at least twice a day. For 34hr resets we should be provided accommodations to a luxury all-inclusive resort, if not near one, airfare should also be provided, 1st class of course.

Get a grip Ravenswood. You start a company and provide your drivers with such trucks. Best of luck with that.

So, companies have to balance between costs and somehow making trucking ATTRACTIVE enough to LURE new drivers. Apparently, there are enough "tough nuts" who demand little in terms of creature comforts in this trade to fill needed driver positions. Companies have not YET become DESPERATE enough to be compelled to give drivers first class Hilton treatment over the road, I gather. Or, trucking UNIONS have not done collective bargaining hard enough maybe.

Why don't companies have dorms at all their nationwide terminals for drivers to camp out at while off the clock? The dorms could be like a small studio apartment complete with bed, kitchen, toilet, sink and shower.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Why are fleet OTR trucks often cramped for living space?

If companies need drivers so badly, one might think the LARGEST on-board living spaces, cab/sleeper configurations, in terms of SHEER volume, available on the market would be offered to drivers. I know there are much larger sleeper units available than what is seen on many fleet tractors.

I have browsed the Kenworth website before and know what the market offers.

Now, here is more of an OTR CAMPER than a "sleeper berth".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJOFVJgtPDI

Does your company offer on-board living this spacious?

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

How does a dog get into the cab of a truck anyway?

I have tried several dog ramps. I would recommend the one from petsmart. It's a little on the expensive side ~$120 if i remember, but the quality is excellent.

Don't these ramps take up precious space inside the trucks since there seems to be precious little personal space?

I have now realized that company trucks don't have the most generous amount of living space for vehicles in the world. Perhaps, truck manufacturers haven't yet caught up with the fact that canine companionship is common and designed their trucks accordingly.

Remember, a police working dog has to work in adverse weather conditions too.

A trucker probably needs a serious top-of-the-line law-enforcement-quality dog.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

How does a dog get into the cab of a truck anyway?

Totally depends on the dog and owner. Small enough lift them in. Big and young enough get in themselves. Some have custom ramps made.

I was hoping to hear from a driver who has a dog. Preferably a German Shepherd. My requirements would be a professionally-trained security dog that is highly agile, at least as agile as any good police dog. I would prefer a dog that can clamber in and out of any rig using only the standard steps with nothing custom made. Lifting a dog as heavy as the typical Shepherd in and out is not only embarrassing but hard on the human spine.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

How does a dog get into the cab of a truck anyway?

Oh, here is a dog climbing up and DOWN a TALL ladder onto a roof!

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrTccGaJxhZFmcAgDMPxQt.?p=dog+climbing+ability&fr=yhs-itm-001&fr2=piv-web&hspart=itm&hsimp=yhs-001&type=wbf_ezdnldd_17_14_ssg01#id=15&vid=92423604d681a6e99db857eb9c34d074&action=view

So, I would think getting in and out of a semi should be a 'duck shoot' for him.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

How does a dog get into the cab of a truck anyway?

Can your larger dog climb into the cab on his own?

Is a trained German shepherd AGILE enough to climb into a typical Class 7 or 8 truck cab on his own?

Will the truck need any special equipment to accommodate a high-clambering hound?

Remember, some police dogs can scale a 12-foot high wall, I have been told.

Are there any videos of dogs actually getting in and out of truck cabs?

Which cab door does the dog usually get in?

Can large dogs typically negotiate the standard cab steps well?

Here is a video of a dog climbing over a 6-foot vertical chain-link fence so I figure getting into a semi with cab steps should be a no-brainer for this animal.

Can the animal get OUT of the truck as easily as he can get in?

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-itm-001&hsimp=yhs-001&hspart=itm&p=german+shepherd+climbs+fence#id=2&vid=936bd7dfffe971d112901b66523aa87e&action=click

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

My last reply on this thread.

Ok, my mind is made up. I will only drive if I can get a LOCAL position, perhaps that is a very small IF, or I will not drive at all. Period.

If I need a greater food supply for the road than what a Thermos lunch box can hold, then no, then this whole truck thing is definitely not my bag. Thank you good people here for helping me make up my cotton-pickin' mind. It may be a decade or more to come before this industry becomes very savory and appetizing for geeky yuppie Starbucks Coffee latte types through massive reforms on how this business is set up. Freight hauling has yet to become more city-slick, civilized and polished in its persona. How much do limousine drivers make?

I should otherwise consider being a machinist, an IT geek, a bookkeeper, a forest ranger or a fleet mechanic. I don't mind the grease so much on my hands as the grease from TS cooks to plug up my arteries. A diesel mechanic gets to wash his hands in highly-effective orange hand cleaner at shift's end and go home for the day. That's exactly what I did as an army motor pool mechanic when we were not in the field.

No more from me on this thread. Promise.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

Ravenswood claims to be a thinker by writing this:

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I tend to think of people who wear tatts as unclean.

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Call me a dirty old man then... The above prejudice is an asinine statement having nothing to do with hygiene. Likely insulted half the people on this forum with that remark. I tend to think you are just another jerk having no clue about this job, even after many of us have sincerely tried (in vain) to help you better understand it. I have managed to eat healthy, maintain my weight and rarely eat truck stop food. Your point is a smoke-screen, a cop-out for a basic fear that you likely do not have what it takes to succeed at this. We see it all the time...nothing new, nothing special.

Is this here a promise?...

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I am going to put my interest in driving as a career at the bottom of the barrel.

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That's a great idea RW, you have our support. With your prejudiced, elitist attitude, a very wise decision.

I do have a clue about truck stops. Laymen who travel in cars tend to bad-mouth them a lot. As a motorist who has traveled through several states in a car, I have a very good idea of the roughness of such establishments. I can't say much positive about the bathrooms in Love's or about the cooks in T/A's.I only stopped at a Pilot for gas one time so I don't know much about their food or toilets.

I usually pack stuff for sandwiches in several coolers on the road. Motel 6's are grungy too these days. I prefer to pitch a tent at a campground with hot showers when I travel by car weather permitting but if is too hot or cold I have to settle for a fleabag with air conditioning or heat that hopefully works. I especially can't stand eating at places in the desert like Nevada or Arizona. The "gravy" one time at a Winnemucca joint had the taste of toothpaste, I swear. This makes me a little gun shy of OTR or even regional work.

Much of my understanding of trucking comes from TV shows, country-western songs and Hollywood movies. It is not a glamorous life.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

Perhaps, I am just living in the WRONG times.

It is not just truck people, but these times. I see disheveled people in many trades these days.

The trouble with a long-haul transportation job is that I can't take along my clinical sterile living conditions, that only a dwelling on a fixed foundation provides, with me unless I were an airline pilot or cruise ship crewman. I'm sure cruise ship personnel live and work in sterling on-board conditions. A truck however is not a cruise ship or even a Winnebago for on-board living luxuries. With a LOCAL driving position, the personnel go home after work every evening after putting the typical banker's hours shift in. They can pack a lunch box for lunch on their shifts and can completely avoid unclean restaurants. I think OTR trucks should have more than just a sleeper berth but an entire enclosed living space the likes of a Class A motorhome: complete with living room, shower, commode, kitchen, stove, ice box and so on. When they start manufacturing Winnebagos or Fleetwoods to pull a semitrailer, I think the thought of OTR might be more appealing.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

Well, Old School, I have to weed out possible future career considerations. Everything has to be carefully weighed out. I need to study and analyze everything before making any moves. I think like a champion chess player in that respect. I am a cautious man. It could be very well that the condition of establishments that truck drivers frequent could be the ultimate turn-off for me. I might just apply for LOCAL driving positions only. That way the truck stop issue is off the table for good. It is not just the paycheck size, but the overall quality of life for me. I won't eat at choke-n-pukes even to make $50,000 a year.

I am on disability right now and on the verge of recovering from it. I have about a year to go before getting back to work anyway.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

So, nobody here can truly rate truck stops by name? I tend to think of people who wear tatts as unclean.

What I have heard is that things at truck stops are rather expensive as meals. I think there is no excuse with such high revenues that these establishments receive that there should be a shortage of janitorial service.

I went to a T/A restaurant in Boise, ID with a friend in 2005. The cook wore long hair and a beard. No hairnet or facial cover. It grossed me out.

I am going to put my interest in driving as a career at the bottom of the barrel.

I was an American soldier for seven years. I would appreciate a work, meal and living environment to be at least "military clean".

My grandfather was a union heavy equipment operator, an Operating Engineer on diesel tractors. Still, he always maintained a neat and gentlemanly appearance. Les Schwab Tires has a corporate policy that all male employees be clean-shaven and this is not even a business in food or healthcare. I wish federal law provided that for food handlers nationwide.

People in the military are clean cut and clean-shaven. Mustaches, if worn, must be trimmed neatly. Mess cooks must always wear a hat and clean white uniforms. Have you seen any truck stops where the cooks were at least clean-shaven? I find it appalling and gross wherever I see male employees in beards handling a customer's food. I worked at a national chain hamburger joint back in 1985. The owner was very tight on males' being clean shaven. I once showed up for work with a slight five o'clock shadow and was given a cheap Bic razor to go into the men's room. Even the owner told the manager to shave off his mustache.

Are there any true ladies and gentlemen who drive trucks in America for a living and look the part in their demeanor and dress?

Yes, it is a blue collar thing to "put the hammer down", but at $50,000+ per year, it is not like an unskilled peon, an ex-con, with a shovel at a construction site.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name the best and worst truck stops in America and Canada.

"Truck stop" can be any establishment that has provisions for a tractor-trailer (at least a single semitrailer) to legally park to do business as a patron for meals, showers, exercise equipment and showers.

Usually these places are chains.

I am a germ freak and seek the absolute CLEANEST places on the map to eat especially. I don't want to see cooks in restaurants unshaven and/or covered in tatts.

Is truck driving a career for germ freaks?

I don't believe having blue-collar employment means one has to look and dress like a slob.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Do you fear autonomous trucking technology?

Well, I won't worry about autotrucks taking away opportunities from me. I am age 52.

I don't know if I trust 401Ks and IRAs.

I think it is much safer to keep my money in the bank, my trusty service-fee-free credit union, and invest future money into a piece of real estate, new construction with a long maintenance warranty . A home that can draw monthly rent revenue from room boarders in my old age.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Do you fear autonomous trucking technology?

But you don't fear human drivers will be replaced by high-tech anytime soon?

I have seen a sign posted at a major UP train yard in Roseville, CA not long ago. It said diesel-electric locomotives can drive around the yard unmanned. The sign warned of trespassing on RR property and that trains can move about unmanned. Still, I have often observed crewmen on those locomotives in that same yard as a train-watcher. They had vests and flashlights at night. They would step on and off the engines to throw switches as needed.

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