Comments By Oscar Graham III

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Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

I love me some Old School and Oscar.

Yes, I have a lot to learn about what really goes on inside a REAL commercial truck on a REAL American road. I have been romanced for decades about truck songs and truck movies. I am sure every red-blooded American boy wanted to be a trucker after CW McCall's "Convoy" was released in late 1975.

Posted:  5 years, 6 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

The headsets cover only one ear ;). Google blue tiger or blue parrot and you will see.

The radios have an audio in jack too. But I've had two cascadias and both had the USB port

Of course, music will not be heard in STEREO with a phone for one ear only. I prefer STEREO music to be heard over the loudspeakers in a vehicle anyway.

The single earphone might be good for talking: two-way voice communications in the cab. Hands-free commo is preferred.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

I love music and grew up in a music family. But, there have been many times I just drive...no music, no radio. I'm not dying. Going a little crazy maybe. 😆 But it ain't 'cause of a lack of music. 😆

Here is a song that makes me believe that American truckers listen to country music to "keep them going" all day and all night long:

Movin' On - Merle Haggard (1973)

Big wheel's rollin'; Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. Big wheel's rollin'; gotta keep 'em goin'. Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. The white line is a lifeline to the nation. And men like Kix and Ronnie make it move. Livin' like a gipsy, always on the go. Doin' what they best know how to do. Jammin' gears has got to be a fever. 'Cos men become addicted to the grind. (The grind.) It takes a special breed to be a truck drivin' man, And a steady hand to pull that load behind.

Big wheel's rollin'; Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. Big wheel's rollin'; gotta keep 'em goin'. Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. Movin' on, yeah.

All night country music keeps 'em goin', Kix and Ronnie keep on movin' on. Hey, big hot cup of coffee, is waitin' up ahead, An' the rhythm of the highway hums along. Jammin' gears has got to be a fever. 'Cos men become addicted to the grind. It takes a special breed to be a truck drivin' man, And a steady hand to pull that load behind.

Big wheel's rollin'; Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. Big wheel's rollin'; gotta keep 'em goin'. Big wheel's rollin', movin' on. Yeah, oh you been drivin' all night long. Movin' on. Why don't you let me take the wheel for a while. What's that? Hey, buddy, aren't you supposed to have your eyes open? We're gone.

To fade.

For decades, I always thought drivers had CB and country western to keep them entertained on the road. I can just see myself over the American road with "I'm a Truck" playing by Red Simpson and "White Line Fever" by Merle Haggard. I suppose hands-free CB is even possible this day unless truckers use another kind of communications to talk between drivers these days.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

It's not illegal to drive with a headset on. The same blue tooth headsets we use for phones can be used for music. Blue Parrot, Blue Tiger etc. I have an mp3 I plug into the radio but only if I lose data reception. I do have a USB port. I use Pandora on my phone. Many listen to audio books, others have Sirius Radio. You can either buy a subscription to Sirius that goes thru the truck radio, or you buy a portable that you can move to various vehicles.

Most drivers I know talk to other drivers. The radio becomes boring, and you can zone out even with listening to it. Conversation can keep you more awake. So in a day, I probably talk way more than I listen to music. I also listen to movies on my phone. Or the news.

Is there a way to talk to other drivers without holding a mic in your hand? I like the idea of total hands-free communication in the cab to keep both hands on the steering wheel at all times. I also like the idea of audio sans headset. I want to be able to hear a fire engine if it is coming up on my rear.

If I were assigned a truck that was not able to have an iPod connected directly to the truck's radio head unit, I might just use the FM transmitter to broadcast my iPod through the truck's FM radio. I don't want to PAY money to subscribe to Sirius Radio unless it is reasonably priced. I want to listen to my own personal music library anyway. I like AM/FM radio too where there is reception and analog local radio is still free of charge!

Anyway, how much is Sirius radio to subscribe to? Can I get baseball and football games? How about Rush Limbaugh and Mike Savage on talk radio?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

I give way to your superior knowledge. Go ahead and teach us about how it's going to be out here.

So, music-listening in the cab is not so common even among modern OTR drivers these days? I don't know. I may just find out as I go. It is my understanding that the dispatcher plans and coordinates every load and the driver is just that, a vehicle operator with orders in hand. At least railroad engineers were given "orders" to drive what train, to where and when. The papers given to drivers may have different terminology.

What I do know is it is illegal to drive with a stereo headset on. A driver must hear his surroundings as well as see them.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

You're back!

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Many drivers would DIE without a huge selection of tunes in the cab for thousands if not millions of career miles.

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No they wouldn't. I very seldom listen to music and I'm a musician. I haven't even come close to dying yet.

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What else is there to do to occupy a driver's mind over the road for weeks at a time anyway?

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Oh let's see...

Delivery schedules. Learning and putting into practice ways to be efficient. Thinking of ways to increase your productivity. Figuring out how to increase your fuel mileage. Contacting customers so that you can move your delivery appointments up. Running calculations in your head for fuel burn off if you happen to be a little bit on the heavy side on a load. Calculating when your next fuel stops need to be. Communicating effectively with your dispatcher. Communicating with customers effectively.

Oscar, I could go on and on and on.

There's plenty to occupy you out here. This is a job - it is real work that involves commitment and focus. It's not a jam session rolling toward catastrophe.

Bring your MP3, you'll probably need it on the bus ride home.

Old School, I will most likely start as a long-haul (OTR) driver. There will be many LONG hours of just sitting behind the wheel and rolling. There will be mostly no touch loads and long hours waiting at the dock. One is probably not going to be contacting customers or doing paperwork behind the wheel of a truck anyway. It is the driver's total responsibility to maintain 100% control of that vehicle at all times when it is moving and avoid wrecks as much as humanly possible. Even as an army soldier and mechanic, having a radio playing tunes in the shop of my military unit where I did truck repair was quite common. Music is MORAL even on the job my section sergeant once told me.

I am age 53 but young at heart still. Not an old grouch yet.

Old School, does your rig even have an AM radio in it?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Music Trivia Question

Do any truckers here listen to music on the road? What kind do you like? Many feel country is most typical for gear-jammers. It keeps them rolling along like Merle Haggard used to sing about. What audio technology is used on most modern rigs these days to play back music in the cab? In the 1970's there were 8-track tapes, then there were cassettes and CDs. Now music is largely digital: MP3. I have a huge collection of mp3 tunes: thousands of tracks literally.

Is it common for the Year 2017 driver to connect some kind of Apple iPod device to the truck's in dash audio system or maybe even a thumb drive? Do you use Bluetooth technology?

This would be very important to many a trucker on the long haul. Many drivers would DIE without a huge selection of tunes in the cab for thousands if not millions of career miles.

It is not trivial to talk about music and the means of playing it here in the cab at all. What else is there to do to occupy a driver's mind over the road for weeks at a time anyway?

If the truck simply had no audio but just an AM/FM radio, an iPod-like device could be connected to a small Belkin FM radio transmitter through the vehicle's radio. I do that in my 1995 Toyota Corolla now. It is cheap but it works in a pinch. It is rather inconvenient to not have the radio head unit controlling the digital music library and playlists however. I can't see myself packing a binder full of music CDs for the road.

I suspect that modern truck audio systems rival those in many new cars with full digital music playback capability.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

First what do you mean "Helicopter". It is a Rotary Wing Aircraft. Pilots can and do wear glasses in military aviation.

G. I. Bill benefits do pay for trucking school. It paid for mine. It also pays for my apprenticeship program. G.I. Bill benefits can be used to help subsidize a pilots license. Only problem is because of the nature of how expensive it is you quickly reach your cap allowed. It does have no problem subsidizing an associates in Aviation Maintenance Technology. Speaking of which since I already have my permissions to test from the FAA, maybe I should take a hiatus from trucking after my year mark to kill off the rest of my benefits and get my Airframe and Powerplant license. Not that I will likely use it, but it would be just one more technical license. Then I will have my Master Barber license, CDL-A, and A&P for maintaining Aircraft. There is a General Electric turbine engine plant about an hour from my home. Maybe I can give that a shot. I already have the training and experience doing quality control for aircraft.

Anyways, I strayed to far from the subject.

As far as disabilities, I AM a disabled Vet. Depending on the severity and type of your disability will effect the outcome of a DOT physical. I have 2 bad discs (L4/L5, L5/S1.) degenerative Disc Disease across my entire spine. Permanent nerve damage to my sciatic nerve roots effecting my left leg in sensation and function. Arthritis in both knees and my left shoulder. Reduced range of motion in my left shoulder from scarring inside the socket of my left shoulder. I have moderate to severe hearing loss in both ears. (I do have hearing aids for both ears). I have moderate tinnitus. Like any combat vet with 3 deployments, I am just a little ummm, quirky. Despite all that I am disabled NOT handicapped!!!! Like anything life, drive to accomplish determines success far more than the obstacles you must overcome.

The question simply is: How bad do you want it?

Your VA Disability award as long as it is a permanent award gets paid regardless of other income. VA Disability is based on Quality of life, not ability to work. I could be in a job making 200k a year and it wouldn't effect my benefit one bit. I could win the lottery and I will keep getting paid no matter what. Just make sure any job that may have some kind of conflict with your Disability that you get your VA doc to sign a letter stating despite your disability you are able to perform the base tasks for that job.

Good Luck.

Drive Safe and God Speed.

Pop Quiz: What is Gyroscopic Precession? No cheating and no Googling it!!!

Well, Pat:

Most laymen and most army soldiers call the "rotary wing aircraft" a "helicopter" or sometimes a "chopper".

I entered the army reserves in 1988 and went active in 1989. I asked, as a SP4 in the Reserves, my hometown recruiting NCO about the warrant officer candidate flight school to pilot rotary-wing aircraft and SSG. McBroom said, "Sorry, son, army aviation is closed to those who wear corrective lenses." so, I remained in my current MOS, 63B10, as light-wheeled vehicle mechanic until taking an honorable discharge in the summer of 1995 under Clinton's RIF program thus cutting my second active hitch two years short.

Maybe things have changed over the 22 years since I got out of the service regarding wearing glasses in military aviation.

The VA benefit I receive is called the Pension (formerly known as the Improved Pension) because my disability is non-service connected and that i served at least 24 hours during the Persian Gulf War era. I was told that I would lose this benefit dollar for dollar for every dollar I make working.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

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Then there is the aviation analogy. Considering to be a pilot. General aviation, military aviation or commercial aviation? Do I wear corrective lenses, glasses? YES! Then military aviation is OUT! OK, there's civil aviation which may allow glasses. What kind of aircraft do I want to fly? Helicopters or fixed-wing airplanes? Well, fixed-wing pilots are in super low demand these days so it would have to be helicopters. Ok, how much is flight training? Oh, about $100,000 to $250,000! Can I afford it? No way! Will any government programs subsidize it? Most likely not!

Then were back to driving commercial trucks as a possibility. Not as much "OUCH!" in the wallet as is private flight school. Trucks are probably a little less hazardous than helicopters to boot.

How much is CDL school? Oh, about $2,000 to $5,000, I read not long ago. Can I afford it out of pocket? Well, it depends upon whether my state's vocational rehabilitation will support it financially or not. I am on disability and on fixed income now. Then, there also might be the possibility of getting trained by a company as opposed to an independent school where I would not need tuition money up front. I should also mention I am a veteran with an honorable discharge but my GI bill benefits are long expired not that that benefit would have supported CDL school anyway.

Ok, Bud A, I now see your point. Better not to put the cart in front of the horse or the trailer in FRONT of the tractor!

I should worry now about whether I have the financial means to even enter trucking in the fisrt place and not be worried over vehicular equipment as engines and gas pedal designs.

Point well taken, sir!

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First, Oscar, thank you for your service. I appreciate it.

Second, I assume that your disability would not disqualify you from operating a CMV. If you are not sure of that, you should make sure of it before doing anything else. (If you already mentioned this in another thread, I apologize. I don't recall it.) No need to give details if you don't want to, just be sure you are not disqualified medically or otherwise.

Third, and just FYI, I think I have read here that some GI Bill benefits will pay for school.

Fourth, the financial means required to start do not have to be huge. It all depends on your situation. If you go to a company-sponsored school, you can probably get by with having something like $1000 set aside (in addition to whatever sorts of bills you have in order to take care of your usual expenses).

Will your current income continue while you are in school? I would find that out. Assuming you are getting by on that amount now, a company school might be a great fit, since you'll make money while training. The first hurdle is the hardest. Is this something you really want to do? Is there something keeping you from making the leap? Is there something else you are thinking of doing instead?

Thank you for the nicer reply, Bud. My GI benefits expired in 2005. My disability is related to obesity: my doctor said I should be in normal health again when I get to about 200 pounds or below. I am looking at about the middle of 2018. I am now on a strict diet and exercise plan.

My VA income benefit should continue through school as long as I am not getting paid any employment wages. I still have yet to consult with my state's voc/rehab agency to find out what extent they would support this. I am age 53. When I was in California in 2014, I had been working with voc/rehab in that state and they supported me to achieve an AS in computer networking management. I fear at my age and not having a BS or higher it might be nearly impossible for me to get employment in that field. Voc/rehab would not support me through a BS degree in CIS.

Trucking seems like the good-paying ideal job for the older set in an age of age discrimination in the American workforce. Trucking seems older-person friendly.

I have $2,000 in a credit card line and some saving in the bank. So, surviving once employed in a paid capacity as a driver would not be an issue.

Voc/rehab later on may suggest I take the route whereby the company offers CDL training. Hopefully, voc/rehab might pay for the DMV fees. I plan to consult with my local voc/rehab agency next month. I have three of five days interim weekend jail time left to serve for a petty theft plea deal. The judge may get this clean off my record a year from now if I am a good boy. I also have two misdemeanor convictions from 1999, non-DUI/non-violent (basically verbal threat charges) and no felony crimes on my record. My driving record is perfect with a good-driver discount from my auto insurance carrier.

I hope a petty theft on my record would not harm me for employment in trucking if the company were to find out about it. I have heard that if you are without any felonies, you are pretty much a shoo-in for trucking employment.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

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PS - If I were to wanna be a truck, I'd long to be a Kenworth classic-hood model sporting a Cummins underneath. I would want my driver to also professionally float my gears. smile.gif

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This made me laugh out loud, then cringe. I mean, eeeewwwwww. No offense, but if I were a truck, I sure wouldn't let anyone drive me! I'd drive myself!! And what she does with my gears is none of your business!!!

Wait a minute, that didn't come out right. Oh well, moving on.

Oscar, I think the basic problem has already been stated several times, but I'll try one more analogy just so I can say I tried.

Let's say, for example, that this forum was all about how to get started in a career as a software developer. You would expect a lot of threads about whether it's necessary to move to Silicon Valley, which programming language is best to learn first, whether it's worth going to college vs. learning on the job, if college, then what major, what sort of salary to expect as a web developer vs. database developer vs. application developer, the difficulty for newbies when starting out working in assembly on embedded systems, how to get hired, how to get promoted, what sort of jobs are good for starting out, how can anyone get any work done when they're put into an open office seating arrangement, should I quit this job and just start working the gig economy, can I make enough off a website to make it worthwhile while I'm working full-time as a truck driver, etc. etc.

Then along comes a guy who wants to talk about different kinds of keyboards. Do you like the old clicky Model M IBM keyboards, or the rubber dome keyboards, or the tactile keyboards, or the kind that are just sort of rubbery that you can roll up and whip out in an instant when you need to start hacking into the Social Security Administration mainframe like that kid in "Live Free or Die Hard"? Or something else?

Then the people who are actually working as programmers and developers offer a couple of thoughts. Some will say clicky, some will say whatever comes with the laptop, some will tell how that rubber roll-up keyboard really sucks and is a waste of money. Of course, I'm the one who is going to tell you all about how great the keyboards from Unicomp are and then offer suggestions about exactly where to map the Ctrl, Tab, and Esc keys. (This will almost certainly draw Rick S. into the conversation.)

Then someone will point out that, hey, wait a minute, what does this have to do with starting a new career writing software anyway? Yes, the tools are important, but what I really want to know is how do I get past that f'ing whiteboard exercise that Google does so I can get hired there!

And now the guy who wants to talk about keyboards (and previously started threads on which kind of laptop is best, will ARM completely displace Intel and AMD in the CPU market, will tablets completely replace laptops, how much memory should you have on your smartphone, and what sorts of foods are available at the commissary where you work) is offended.

That's what this is like. Sort of.

Then there is the aviation analogy. Considering to be a pilot. General aviation, military aviation or commercial aviation? Do I wear corrective lenses, glasses? YES! Then military aviation is OUT! OK, there's civil aviation which may allow glasses. What kind of aircraft do I want to fly? Helicopters or fixed-wing airplanes? Well, fixed-wing pilots are in super low demand these days so it would have to be helicopters. Ok, how much is flight training? Oh, about $100,000 to $250,000! Can I afford it? No way! Will any government programs subsidize it? Most likely not!

Then were back to driving commercial trucks as a possibility. Not as much "OUCH!" in the wallet as is private flight school. Trucks are probably a little less hazardous than helicopters to boot.

How much is CDL school? Oh, about $2,000 to $5,000, I read not long ago. Can I afford it out of pocket? Well, it depends upon whether my state's vocational rehabilitation will support it financially or not. I am on disability and on fixed income now. Then, there also might be the possibility of getting trained by a company as opposed to an independent school where I would not need tuition money up front. I should also mention I am a veteran with an honorable discharge but my GI bill benefits are long expired not that that benefit would have supported CDL school anyway.

Ok, Bud A, I now see your point. Better not to put the cart in front of the horse or the trailer in FRONT of the tractor!

I should worry now about whether I have the financial means to even enter trucking in the fisrt place and not be worried over vehicular equipment as engines and gas pedal designs.

Point well taken, sir!

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

Oscar, what always concerns us about you is how you are always so focused on all the peripheral things about this career. There's not a new driver out here who cares one whit about how the various class 8 engines vibrate.

That is why we have such doubts about your ability to make it in this business. As an entry level driver, or even an experienced driver, you are going to get whatever engine and truck you get, and if it vibrates some way that you don't like your employer is going to laugh hysterically as they send you back home to your comfortabke position on the couch doing "research" on how to get started at truck driving.

When you get serious, and have some realistic questions about how to make it in a field where 95 percent of the curious minded newbies never survive their first year, we might begin to take you a little more seriously. As for now, you're just sort of amusing.

I'm not trying to be critical or hostile. I want you to realize that based on the things you post in here, you fit the perfect profile of a guy who will never survive out here in this endeavor.

I hope you can make it, but you need someone who will shoot straight with you and get you focused on the things that are critically important.

I'm sorry. I thought this was a TRUCK forum about ALL THINGS TRUCKING. I did not realize that most people here feel the equipment itself in this trade was not a critical thing. It seems to be all about just the training and the driving here. I was hoping people here could lighten up and be a bit more cheerful and perhaps sometimes welcome threads just about anything related to trucks. I did not realize people had to be so grouchy.

The sole purpose of this thread of mine was to get YOUR opinion about commercial diesel engines and not to complain. Some drivers may have a soft spot for some engines and others may not care. After all, you the driver, have to feel and hear your vehicle's engine for countless hours, miles, weeks, months and even years.

I figured some drivers might also be enthusiasts of the mechanical nature of their vehicles as well as what the job pays. To me, the big-rig excitement is all about the grunt of the diesel engine, the roar of the Jake brakes and the whine of the turbochargers as well as how to shift a transmission correctly and back a rig to the dock masterfully. The money is important but it is not about just the money.

Mr. Old School, I DO feel that one does have to be enthusiastic about any career to make it in that career otherwise there might be just day-to-day drudgery on the job.

I wish I could find a Web-based forum where people can just kick back and shoot the breeze about all things trucking no matter how small or tall.

Like Red Simpson sings, "There'd be no truck drivers if it wasn't for us TRUCKS!"

Perhaps, Brett could offer a "Truckers Lounge" or "Home Terminal" forum where anything goes, truck-wise.

PS - If I were to wanna be a truck, I'd long to be a Kenworth classic-hood model sporting a Cummins underneath. I would want my driver to also professionally float my gears. smile.gif

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

There is also a big difference in suspensions vs a Ford cab chassis. Basing an opinion on one encounter and no bed on the truck? Kinda dumb if you ask me.

I have mostly driven cat motors. One isx. I could get used to it with more time. Now I have a series 60 12.7 Detroit that has it's own characteristics. I am beginning to like this little girl.

Dumb? As I have told everybody before, I have never even sat in a Class 7/8 truck, with or without the motor running, so I have no idea what the Class 7/8 engines feel like or sound like in any of them from the perspective of the driver's seat. My only truck experience has been Class 6 and below. Class 7/8 stuff would all be brand-new to me if I were to touch such a truck in person.

Can we please refrain from the name-calling here, Pat?

Maybe you can tell me how a CAT motor feels and sounds as opposed to a Cummins or Detroit in any Class 7/8 truck you may have experienced.

All else the same, does the CAT engine generally cause more vibrations in a Class 7/8 tractor than Cummins or others or is it louder than Cummins or other engine brands? A tractor has no body too just like cab chassis. I would not know how human-felt engine vibration would be affected by the degree of mass over the rear of the chassis. I always thought it was in the motor mounts and the way the engine is balanced and designed.

I take it your "little girl" is the Series 60 12.7 Detroit engine you speak of affectionately. You know.... like calling a ship a SHE.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

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Cummins diesel engines were well-engineered, refined and well-balanced.

Looking back at history, Cummins is the first American diesel originally designed specifically for truck use.

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Oscar, it's still pretty obvious to me that you're not going to become a truck driver.

But... I do think you'd be an excellent sales rep for Cummins Diesel engines. You've got just enough BS on something that you don't have a clue about that I think some of these purchasing would be like putty in your hands.

Go for it!

The engine I may be saddled with won't be a deterrent for me to become a truck driver. I was just making a polite conversation about engines. I was a diesel mechanic by trade in the army once, you know. I only complained about a CAT I experienced one time in a medium-duty Ford chassis cab. I am sure most if not all modern OTR trucks, regardless of make, engine and transmission, have pretty smooth mechanicals and don't shake like hardware store paint mixers.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

I am going to guess that you have never pulled a heavy load or your opinion of CAT would be different. Each has their own characteristics and niche they do better than the other. Detroit is fuel economy. CAT is pulling power. Cummins falls somewhere in the middle.

Now with that said, I have made some changes to mine puts it right up there on power and on top for fuel.

Of course, if one is going to be in a truck cab for countless hours as a living, one might also consider the "comfort" factor of the engine too, sir.

Perhaps, the CAT motors don't vibrate so much in Class 7/8 rigs. I don't know since I have never been in any Class 7/8 truck before. I just remember that CAT in a new medium-duty Ford I test-drove one year shook quite badly at idle. Could have been inferior Ford motor mounts too.

I have driven Dodge pickups with 5.9 turbo Cummins: smooth as a baby's rump. I have driven an Army 5-ton with 855 Cummins: still, smooth as a baby's rump. Distinctively quiet inside the cab too.

I have always had the impression that Cummins diesel engines were well-engineered, refined and well-balanced.

Looking back at history, Cummins is the first American diesel originally designed specifically for truck use. CAT has its origins in tractor/construction equipment use.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

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13 speed trans question.

So my rig is a 13 spd (EF trans). And when I was in school they had me on a 10 speed. And the instructor layed out what gears for what speed. For instance 8th gear is about 35 mph. 9th is 45mph, 10th is 55mph and above. Now it wasn't a big deal on the upshifting, just max it and shift it. But it helped on the downshifting. He had us slow down to 30mph and downshift to 7. By the time we got moved over and revved it was right about at 25mph. Then slow down to 15 and go to 5. Then stop.

So my question is, does anyone have a chart or reference they use for what speed to downshift at? And what gears do you skip thru? I've done some Google searches but nothing that I want pops up. I'm stuck going down 1 gear at a time or just coming up and stopping until I can figure it out.

Did they teach you floating the gears in school or just double-clutching?

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

What's your favorite Class 7/8 diesel engine?

I like Cummins because of their smooth idle and quietness.

I drove and worked on Cummins-equipped trucks in in the Army as a mechanic. M900-series 5-ton 6x6 by AM General.

Inline-6 855 cu. in. I was impressed by this fine engine.

A masterpiece in machinery. An inline-six, not a V-8, is a TRUE truck truck diesel power plant.

Later on, in 2005, I sat in a new Ford Class 5 truck with a CAT six and it vibrated like a paint mixer.

Then, the following year, I drove a late-model 22-foot Penske moving truck by International and that was pretty smooth.

Sitting in the CAT-equipped idling medium-duty Ford made me think CAT motors were crude for truck use.

I have never sat in, driven or ridden in any Class 7/8 truck in all my 53 years.

P)S- The International moving truck from Penske was diesel powered, of course. A straight-six.

Posted:  5 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Do you like CAT, Cummins or other?

What's your favorite Class 7/8 diesel engine?

I like Cummins because of their smooth idle and quietness.

I drove and worked on Cummins-equipped trucks in in the Army as a mechanic. M900-series 5-ton 6x6 by AM General.

Inline-6 855 cu. in. I was impressed by this fine engine.

A masterpiece in machinery. An inline-six, not a V-8, is a TRUE truck truck diesel power plant.

Later on, in 2005, I sat in a new Ford Class 5 truck with a CAT six and it vibrated like a paint mixer.

Then, the following year, I drove a late-model 22-foot Penske moving truck by International and that was pretty smooth.

Sitting in the CAT-equipped idling medium-duty Ford made me think CAT motors were crude for truck use.

I have never sat in, driven or ridden in any Class 7/8 truck in all my 53 years.

Posted:  5 years, 8 months ago

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Admin: login troubles

LastPass password manager does not automatically generate my password in the password field when logging in, only my username. Is this page not compatible with password manager clients?

Posted:  5 years, 8 months ago

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2 dogs, a motorcycle & new underwear

Yesterday I was bobtailing back from Findlay OH & there was a road closure. I had to detour down a country road (with no lane divider) in the middle of farmland USA.

Out of nowhere 2 dogs come bolting out of a cornfield into the road (I use cornfield generically, no idea what they're growing).

I'm probably doing 45-50mph at the time. There's a motorcycle in the oncoming lane that SWERVES INTO my lane (head-on) to avoid these dogs. I have 2 options. Hit the brakes or take the ditch. I hit the jake, depress the clutch & basically stand on the service brake. The motorcycle comes within arms reach of the tractor before swerving back into his lane.

I'm a dead stop, heart beating out of my chest. I thought I was going to kill him! I hit my hazards, open the door & puke everywhere. The bike... just keeps rolling.

I compose myself & get back into the truck (which is a loaner). The red exclamation point on the Qualcomm is flashing & I have messages asking if I'm okay. The truck recorded a hard brake critical event (obviously).

My usual truck (which is equipped with a drive cam) is in the shop for service. This truck doesn't have one...which is a shame. This was the exact kind of videos they show to new-hires in orientation. I could have been famous! Lol.

Seriously though, everyone is fine & I maintained control of the truck. I have to talk to the safety dept. guy (who is out of the office for the holiday) on Tuesday. This should be a fun conversation.

I'm a little concerned with having to discuss a critical event, but All-in-all...I wouldn't have done anything differently. I saved someone's life yesterday. I'm happy with that.

Stay aware! Anything can happen, anywhere at anytime. 👍

Charlie:

It's obvious where the NEW UNDERWEAR comes into the story. I would slow down through those cornfields. Maybe 35 MPH max.

Posted:  5 years, 8 months ago

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2 dogs, a motorcycle & new underwear

There is a song about a heroic truck driver, Big Joe, who "takes the ditch" (or was it a cliff?) to save a bus load of school children while dying himself.

Red Sovine in Phantom 309, year 1967

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-itm-001&hsimp=yhs-001&hspart=itm&p=Phantom+309#id=2&vid=2698ae4b18148ed281031249f8***d68&action=click

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