Profile For Robert

Robert's Info

  • Location:
    Barbourville, KY

  • Driving Status:
    Considering A Career

  • Social Link:
    Robert On The Web

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 2 months ago

Robert's Bio

Call me Bobby hill everyone does. As of today 8/12/17 I am learning what I heed to do to be a trucker.

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Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

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Which company would you suggest?

This is just my 2 cents. The way I decided was homework. I saw cr england and Pam transport first. They do a ton of marketing but I wanted to see the benefits, and that's why I continued to look. Not just here but at truck stops awkwardly asking real truckers (not saying no one here isn't) what they'd suggested. I looked at it all. I chose prime inc., because it suits my needs. Find a company that does that for you, and you can see yourself at least 5 years with them. I can't say what one to choose because I'm not you. I don't know your needs nor your wants. Look into what the companies do for emoyees and families. That's where I started as I have 2 kids and a wife.

I am getting my CDL but need the schooling a company would provide. I originally thought I would go with C. R. England but it has been hard to get information out of the recruiter that I am working with and I have read MANY horrible reviews about their home time. First question, what is the amount of time I would be gone from the first day of classes to my first home time day? I am actually set to leave for IN this evening but am considering delaying it a few days because I hear that Roehl might be a better option. I may also have an issue with the hair follicle test. I used to be a light marijuana user but have of course stopped using it entirely for a number of reasons. Second question, would Roehl even hire me? I kind of need answers fast! Thank you all for your time as I know this is a GREAT website for information and I value EVERYONE'S opinions! =D

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

The high road training in a begginers eyes

Glad I'm not the only strength trainer. Always good to see others that like the iron.

Paul - I'd definitely be down for giving out some tips about building muscle and strength! BTW what time will you be arriving on the 27th? I just got my greyhound confirmation.. I leave Saturday the 26th and wont be arriving until 10:25 pm Sunday night. Unfortunately the greyhound ticket I originally wanted was sold out and would of got me in Missouri at 1:00 pm. So now ill be getting in pretty late.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

How does prime get their money back?

Well from what I've seen prime is the best on many things for a starting trucker such as myself. I'd say it's pretty reasonable to buy the equipment, and since they do incremental pay is an add on bonus of you ask me I mean imagine paying full price specially right up front. I do appreciate the advice and hope to be on the road soon.

Also, just a heads up but when you upgrade to your own truck, there are certain items you are required to purchase for truck. The total cost depends upon division, refer isn't nearly as much as flatbed with their tarps and such. Prime does allow you to purchase this stuff via driver code/truck # and repay it in increments. The items are yours to keep, however some things can be sold back when you leave. For example, I got new chains, still in bag for few hundo, if I don't use them (if I need chains,I am getting off road, can only go up to about 30-35 and is waste of clock, not super safe either), I can sell them back for full price. Could have gotten used for about half price but recouping that money isn't likely. Just something to keep in mind but I wouldn't let it keep you from choosing prime.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

How does prime get their money back?

Thanks so much

double-quotes-start.png

I know you get a $200 allowance (loan) for a period, but what about the entirety of the PSD program? Do they dock your pay as they will the $200 you loaned for food, or is it truly free as long as the contract isn't broken?

double-quotes-end.png

You pay NOTHING towards the PSD unless you leave. If you stay a whole year that is it...no deductions. Contract met.

If you leave you pay a prorarted amount on a weekly basis. My contract gave prime permission to ask my next employer to deduct $70 per week from my pay.... But prorated. So if I stayed 6 mos I'd owe half the loan. If I stayed 9 mos I'd owe a quarter.

I signed on the dotted line. Have been here almost two years and only repaid the $200 I borrowed. Nothing towards the schooling.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Prime training - how long will I go without pay?

I see. Glad I've been studying. It's my their time doing the high road. If I don't get 100% it's my fault. Haha

Something to understand...there are NO classes for the permit test. You are responsible for studying prior to coming to Prime and you start taking the written exams the second day of orientation. Use the High Road program on this site and you will pass with ease. Some people think they will get classroom time to learn the test...you don't.

High Road Training Program

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

How does prime get their money back?

I know you get a $200 allowance (loan) for a period, but what about the entirety of the PSD program? Do they dock your pay as they will the $200 you loaned for food, or is it truly free as long as the contract isn't broken?

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Prime training - how long will I go without pay?

That answered a lot thank you.

The first week, which includes orientation, physical, drug test, agility test, some classes, computer based training (CBTs), simulator training (basic concepts of shifting/dbll clutching) and obtaining CDL Permit is not paid. However, hotel and adequate food is. You will need approximately $160 for registration and license transfer/permit. There are a variety of restaurants nearby as well as Wal-Mart if bring extra cash but can survive without it. After first week, you generally get a trainer and hit the road for PSD, sometimes as early as Fri or Sat (I was on road first thing Sat am). During this phase you are lent $200/wk for food/basics. You run off one clock with trainer in passenger seat at all times while driving. You will learn pretrip, backing and ability to pass CDL test during this phase, generally 2-4 weeks. When ready you return to terminal for testing. Upon passing you become Prime employee and are set to begin 2nd phase (TNT). During this phase you and trainer (sometimes same from PSD, sometimes different, I had one trainer straight thru) are dispatched as a team operation (you drive while he sleeps, vice versa, truck is moving most of the time). During this phase you are paid $700 or 14 cpm, whichever is greater. They also begin deducting $25/wk to repay money borrowed during PSD phase. TNT lasts for 30,000 miles (generally 6-8 weeks) and once completed you will be brought back to terminal for upgrade to solo operation, which pay varies by division (reefer, flatbed and tanker) and whether you take lightweight or condo truck.

In all, expect about 4-5 weeks before receiving first $700 check (before taxes/dediction, generally 5-550 net) unless you run more than 5000 miles, then it's more.

Folks do it every day, just plan ahead and take the training serious. Best of luck.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Prime training - how long will I go without pay?

Does the PSD include time while receiving the permit?

Meant to add...only the orientation week is without pay. PSD phase lasts about 4 weeks. TNT lasts a couple of months.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Prime training - how long will I go without pay?

See also: Prime Inc Paid CDL Training

As you do the school they say you're not paid then again not paid psd. My question is if I come in not having even the CDL permit how long can I expect to be without pay? I mean I've got bills, and that's why I've yet to start applying as I'm putting money back. Any information would be great. Thanks in advance.

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Condo vs lightweight prime

Thanks for all the info everyone. I'll keep pondering on it, and let you all know what way I go.

I drive a lightweight. The difference is in the lightweight, your bed is just about against the drivers seat. There is also a bit less storage. The lightweight had 2 overhead storage compartments above the bed and a small netted cubby hole as well. You can raise the bed up for additional storage as well. . The engine is smaller in the lightweight as well. They come with Detroit Diesel 13s as opposed to the 15s in the condo. Basically means climbing hills can be a pain sometimes.

Pay wise, that extra 5 cents added up. I think it ewuals around an extra $6000 a year on average. It gets paid out on per diem.

I'm perfectly fine with the lightweight. I never intended to bring much stuff on the truck in the first place and I like the extra money. My biggest complaint is the smaller engine.

Something I forgot to add is driving a lightweight opens you up to additional freight because you can haul heavier loads the condo can't. I think the heaviest load I've done was 47 or 48,000 pounds.

You don't have to have a lightweight if you don't want to but you may be waiting a few days for a condo if you go that route.

I also have driven a lightweight here at Prime for the past year and change, currently turning in for condo as I take training course. As mentioned the financial incentive can work out to several grand a year (5 or 6) depending upon miles you run. Basically multiply miles ×.05, if 3000 miles, its an extra $150 that week, avg of 2500 during first year is more likely, which would be about $125/wk×52=6500, however consider hometime and such figure about 6 grand. As far as space, the International lightweight has much more storage space available than Freighliner lightweight. Additional benefits of driving a lightweight are easier maneuvarability, particularly in tight spaces, might only be about a foot in reality but can do wonders mentally on the mind and stress of a rookie. You also have the ability to haul slightly heavier loads than condos because the truck itself is lighter. I don't know about engine specifics as previously pointed out but my lightweight international felt like it pulled uphill better than my trainers Cascadia condo, the reality of it tho may differ. As for the Wal-Mart dedicated, I know the one out of Lewiston, ME required lightweight (did at least, maybe changed) and I also believe it had a minimum pay, however don't take that as gospel. Good luck on your journey.....

For the record, my condo with a dd15 is a dog on hills too when loaded heavy.

Also, I've hauled just a tic over 49k and remained legal at 79,900.

Robert...My suggestion is to get several months OTR experience before committing to Walmart Dedicated assignment. Can be a very tough account for an entry level driver to handle.

The pros are; more steady income & hometime, typically domiciled at a Walmart DC, rarely wait more for a load, never need to search for an empty trailer, regular routes (that you will learn) and a very accessible driver support team.

The cons are; demanding delivery schedule, most stores are live unloads, very close quarter maneuvering at times, good interpersonal skills although optional, will help you get things done, and typically 13+ hour days.

Although an experienced driver can make great money on the Walmart account, takes at least 6 months for a rookie to gain traction and learn all there is to know (on top of all the other rookie learning curve issues there are) about the stores and their process.

Click on these links for past threads about Walmart:

Walmart Dedicated

Good luck!

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Condo vs lightweight prime

Prime gives lightweight truckers extra 5cpm just for driving the lightweight trucks. My question is does that 5cpm make a big enough difference when it come to comfort and space? I also read prime has Wal-Mart dedicated but only drive lightweights if you do this. Is Wal-Mart good pay and home time? Also what other differences in condo and lightweight trucks are there to really choose one or the other?

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

The high road training in a begginers eyes

Glad I'm not the only one on here that's just starting. I probably won't start in this month as I want to be sure it's feesable for my wife when I won't be paid until the TNT training. It's hard to leave my family, but hey I gotta pay the bills. Paul I hope to see you there as well as it would be good to meet people new and start making friends and travelling. I know you want be hanging with friends but it's best t o make them then enemies. Good luck to you I hope it goes well. Hope you let us know how it goes.

Hey, Bobby. I'm tracking right there with you, man. Just got serious, started researching and found this website which has been an incredible wealth of wisdom. I chose Prime and will be heading to Springfield on the 27th of August. I was surprised at how quickly the ball got rolling once I put in the application with Prime. It took the recruiter about two days to get everything situated--he wanted me to be in next week's class, but that was a bit TOO fast for me.

I don't have much advice for you, we're on the same boat it seems, but I am seriously digging the High Road program and am trying my best to make my 36-year-old brain be a sponge until I head off to training. Hope to see you there!

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

The high road training in a begginers eyes

I appreciate the reply and info. I will and have already clicked some of these links. Thanks for the welcome and offer about questions. I'm hoping I'll be on the road soon. Im planning to keep a diary myself or vlog it. Thanks again.

Welcome Bobby. There is a lot of information on Prime. Use the search bar in the upper LH corner of the page to search on it or anything else that interests you.

One of the best Prime Diaries can be found in this link: Rainy's PSD Experience

When you have a chance you will also benefit from investing time reading the links in the TT starter kit.

Give this a go and come back when you have questions you want answered. Good luck!

Posted:  5 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

The high road training in a begginers eyes

Hi I'm Bobby most call me Bobby hill as I look like him in person, and this is my first post. I'm 26, and I just started learning about CDLs and stumbled on trucking truth. I have been looking at truck driving for years, but I never got serious about it. I didn't know where to begin. So I looked up true trucking reviews, and I came across the Pam review trucking truth page. I read it and decided I'll see if there's more...... sure enough after 5 reviews I was hooked on it and ready to start being serious.

The question wasn't when, but who would I choose. I've no CDL nor do I have a permit. That's when I looked back and saw places like Pam paid for training. I was excited to say the least. I recently married 2 months ago on june 10th. We've 2 kids (not bio kids I just stepped up) boy and girl. You could say I live an American dream she's a cheerleader, and he's a football player.

My wife and the kids are the main reason I want to start trucking. Her dad was a trucker then did railroad so she knows the struggle, and is more then accepting of this choice.thank-you-2.gif

So I started the high road training program (sorry if the back story was a bit long bad habit my wife says) to accelerate my learnig and understanding. So far so good. I love that it's detailed yet brakes it down into pages and quizzes and can be redone. I soak up knowledge fast so it was easy for me to pass a few right off (not bragging I swear).

What I think is that this site should be a truckers first stop. I love that there is this forum full of knowledge from experienced people, and non-experienced. It makes the learning curve and expectations much easier and realistic.

You're probably wondering what company I've decided. I'm not 100% sure but leaning to prime inc. If you got info on the company experience let me know. I'm working now and live in KY right of I75 and have questions like...

If I end up out of state to train then off to work must I relocate, or do I work and go home?

Is $500-$700 a week a realistic number to expect in a career with prime, or other companies?

I make $650-$750 a week now but dont like the job as much. I really want to do this and have the drive. Thanks for reading and if you could answer these questions it be a big help deciding where to work.

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