Profile For Paul H.

Paul H.'s Info

  • Location:
    Jacksonville, FL

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 6 months ago

Paul H.'s Bio

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Posted:  4 months, 2 weeks ago

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How much pay should I ask for?

That's always been a tough question. The "what is my worth". Personally I think a paid by the day might work here. Especially since you said you may be loading/ unloading in addition to driving. And have a "layover" factored in as well when you're just staying in hotels.

I'm definitely leaning towards daily or hourly.

Posted:  4 months, 2 weeks ago

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How much pay should I ask for?

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Basically, you have to pay the portion of social security the employer pays. My best advice is get an accountant, not a tax preparer. He will save you enough to pay for his services at the very least.

I'm glad you told me that, because I was thinking about talking to my tax preparer cousin. Although as far as this truck driving gig, I don't know yet whether it'll be W2 or not. But for everything else I'm doing, I'm definitely self-employed.

Posted:  4 months, 2 weeks ago

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How much pay should I ask for?

Paul says:

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The school has rented the truck and trailer (53 ft) for me to drive. So I have no financial responsibility.

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As for the bus driving gig, first figure an hourly rate. Say $20/hour. If you drive and charge $0.40/mile, an average overall speed of 50mph will equal the twenty bucks an hour. Bid a combination of time and miles. This might be a place to start.

I've recently started doing truck driveway. Here's my "training" topic. For this I don't own any trucks and as an independent I can work when I want (which for me is all the time, but I can take off when I want to.)

Thanks Errol! I've got to look into the whole self-employment thing for taxes. I managed to narrowly avoid having to file that way last year for music gigs, but with everything I'm doing now it has to happen. The driveaway gig sounds awesome! I could never do triples, though. Gives me anxiety just thinking about it.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

How much pay should I ask for?

Paul, is this part time gig in addition to your regular driving job?

Are you still working at Prime?

No, I left Prime a couple of years ago and moved to Colorado for a sous chef position. But I just moved back home to Florida and am piecing together different income sources (music gigs, online transcription and writing work, and now this UCF gig) rather than going back into a kitchen or a truck full time. Trying to live outside the box for once. :-)

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

How much pay should I ask for?

Driving around a bunch of college cheerleaders? And you want pay???

Ha! It's the equipment, not the cheerleaders. Although honestly, I'd probably want to be paid more to drive a bus full of college kids, cheerleaders or not. :-)

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

How much pay should I ask for?

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I didn't see u mention per diem or hotel stays, or the logistics of where u will park, all things u would take care of...

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention hotels are taken care of.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

How much pay should I ask for?

Hi everyone! I just scored a nice little part-time gig driving a truck for a college cheerleading team. My cousin is the coach, and he told me to let him know how much I need to be paid. I'm not really sure how to go about this. Some trips will be long (800+ miles), but others will probably not be long enough for per-mile pay to be worth my time, especially since all the events are at least two days long. Does anyone have any suggestions on a reasonable hourly rate to charge for shorter trips? And what would you charge per mile for the longer ones? And for the longer ones where there will be a couple of days between arrival and departure, how should I handle the days where I'm not driving or setting up, seeing as how I'm still away from home for the job? I'm not an O/O, the school has rented the truck and trailer (53 ft) for me to drive. So I have no financial responsibility. And I will be helping with loading/unloading and setting up of equipment. My experience is as a company driver with Prime, so I'm just used to doing what I'm told and taking what I get. Now that I get to set the terms, I'm at a loss. :-) I would appreciate any advice!

Posted:  5 years, 2 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

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Salt Lake

Posted:  5 years, 2 months ago

View Topic:

Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

Thanks Brett! I have a Facebook album going titled OTR. I try to take pictures every day, though it doesn't always happen.

When I get my own truck, I'll have plenty to do during downtime. I'll have my dog, so of course I'll be getting her out and about whenever I have the chance. If I feel like I can handle it once I've been solo for awhile, I may continue the business degree I started, one online class at a time (I worry about missing deadlines due to inconsistent internet access, though). And I'll have my guitar. I'm single with minimal bills, so I won't be stressing over money the way my trainer does. No matter what happens on any individual day with a customer or a crappy load, I'll be making more money this year than I ever have, and saving most of it. So I'm laid back about things.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Newbie what to take with me while I go to atend classes for prime truck driving school

Just to clarify, Prime does not teach you the information you need to pass the CDL permit exam. You have to study yourself. You are expected to be ready to take the exam when you get here. Prime teaches you how to drive, not how to pass the written exam.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Newbie what to take with me while I go to atend classes for prime truck driving school

You get a $200 advance every Friday, starting on the fourth day of orientation (the day you should be cleared and hooked up with an instructor). Once you get your CDL, which should take no more than a month, you are hired and start gettting your $600 minimum pay, minus the $25 a week for the advances. And for the first two weeks they take out the money for your passport and CDL.

You should get your CDL permit from your state before you go. I didn't, and it set me behind. There are two different schedules starting on day one of orientation - one for people with permits, and one for people without. If you have your permit, you will get more opportunities to practice on the simulators and the practice pad. If you don't have it, you can't do anything until you do. If you do come without a permit, then you should definitely be studying. Use the training program on this website first. That will get you most of the way there. Then study the Missouri CDL handbook. That will fill in the few things that Missouri asks that aren't on the training program here. I recommend doing the training program first, because it's very easy to learn from. Then when you have all that knowledge, it's easier to read the Missouri handbook and soak in the information.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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The Adventures of Daniel B.

This 55mph business will definitely take some time getting used to. I used to be the one passing people, now I can't even pass a turtle. It is much less stressful though.

Yeah, and nobody likes being passed by a Prime truck. It's like an insult to their manhood or something. They'll be playing on their phone or whatever, not realizing they've slowed down, then as soon as they see that they're being passed by a Prime truck they speed up. It's a wake-up call that they need to pay attention to what they're doing.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Leave for Prime tomorrow afternoon...

Good luck Mark! As far as direct deposit info goes, make sure you have something official from your bank with the information on it. Prime requires either a voided check or some kind of official letter from your financial institution with the direct deposit info. I guess they don't trust us to know our account and routing numbers. I called Navy Federal and had them email me a letter in PDF format, which I emailed to my dispatcher.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

Thanks man. Maybe I'll see you around. I'll be the guy in the Bama hat.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

Thanks Roadkill. You'll like it here, I think. You have to have a lot of patience, but it's a good company. I'm actually sitting in the truck in the Springfield terminal right now. I drove 11 hours last night for the last leg of the trip here from LA. Got my actual CDL (the DMV initially gives you a temporary paper CDL, and they mail the real one to Prime) from our dispatcher, we got the truck washed, did laundry, ate a good lunch (the food at the terminal is really good, the food at the campus is ok), and now I'm about to sleep until we get a load assigned, and then I'm going to sleep some more. I want to get a few hours of non-moving sleep in before we leave. When are you starting Prime?

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

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Utah

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

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Wyoming

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

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Utah

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

Our destination got changed. I have to pick up my hard copy CDL from Springfield, and the APU is scheduled for maintenance, so we’re dropping off the special strawberries at the Prime terminal for someone else to take to Ohio. Since he’s quitting when my training is done, and I should be done the middle of February, my trainer decided we’re not doing our scheduled home time on January 27th. He wants to just get this done as quickly as possible. So by the time I finally go home I will have been gone for three months. I’m not happy about that. But whatever. There are advantages to putting it off, the details of which I won’t bore anyone with. However, we will be running through my home soon just long enough for me to transfer my CDL. So although I won’t actually see anyone, at least I’ll get to be in my part of the country for a minute.

Oh, and I almost forgot to mention the windstorm. We were making GREAT time getting to California, way ahead of schedule. But we had to stop at a truck stop in Cheyenne, Wyoming because of wind. Up to 65 mph gusts. We stopped because it obviously wasn’t safe, but then soon after we stopped they closed I-80 at several points. So we were stuck in that truck stop for a day and a half. Not only was it extremely boring, but the trip was broken up so that it wasn’t all on one paycheck. That doesn’t affect me so much, because I have a guarantee, but my trainer was not happy. I kept checking online to see when the roads were open, and the second they were we left. I drove, and it was still really windy. That was a hair-raising drive, but we made it out alive. Wyoming is another beautiful state I’d really love to see more of.

That’s all for now. I’m going to sleep.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Meandering musings and misadventures from the road

So I’ve been in the TNT portion of training with Prime Inc for almost two weeks now, and it’s been an experience. TNT is team driving, with a trainer. So unlike PSD, where I drove just enough to learn how to pass the exam, I’m driving just as much as my trainer. Backing at truck stops and shippers and receivers (it’s a lot harder when you’re aiming between trucks instead of cones), and driving on city streets in places like LA, Oakland, and Cleveland (two of those were by accident, and one was to go to a truck stop in Oakland that I decided to pass on once I saw it). I’ve gotten lots of good pictures (Utah is the most consistently photogenic state I’ve seen so far), and the list of states I haven’t been to is rapidly dwindling.

My trainer is really cool. We get along great, and he’s pretty laid back about things. However, shortly after I got on his truck he decided that he was going to quit Prime as soon as my training is finished. Like so many people, he got suckered into leasing when he started at Prime. Not a good deal. He’s not doing well. Unlike my PSD instructor, who is a company driver and does VERY well. He warned me not to lease, and I told him I had no intention of leasing. I told him that I’d never heard anyone say anything good about leasing, and told him that Truckingtruth.com was one of the main places I got that from. He said he wished someone would have told him that in the beginning. So while he’s a great guy, and laid back towards me, he’s got a short-timer’s attitude now and he’s pretty much fed up with everything. Yesterday didn’t help that at all. We dropped off a load of bread near Oakland that we had picked up in Michigan, then were told to get to this place near LA as fast as possible to pick up a load of strawberries. No other information, no appointment time or anything. So we start down there, sacrificing things we needed to do like shower and do laundry (I spilled soup all over my last clean pair of pants, so now I’m down to shorts – not going to cut it now that we’re out of California). We figured we’d get loaded that night and be on our way to Ohio. Well, our dispatcher didn’t tell us that the place closes at eight, and didn’t tell us that we weren’t picking up until the next day anyway. She just wanted us to hurry up and get there, just because. Not giving any consideration to the fact that we need all the information in order to plan the trip properly. Especially since California hardly has any truck stops (that state is a big middle finger to truckers). So we slept at the shipper overnight, expecting to get loaded early in the morning. We got checked in third, yet somehow sat there all day waiting to be loaded while we watched truck after truck come in after us, get loaded, and leave. My trainer kept going to the office to see what was up, and it was always “Your load’s not here yet,” or “The load is being cooled. How long? I don’t know. Half hour, an hour, I don’t know.” All day we sat there and watched strawberries brought in on little trucks, pallet after pallet. Apparently we were waiting on special strawberries just for us. I don’t know what the problem was. It made no sense. So we finally got out of there around six in the evening, so I had to drive through LA during rush hour, which is more like rush five hours.

You know, there’s a lot of land in this country. I really wish the people of LA would make use of it and spread out. I drove for almost three hours through endless cities during rush hour in the LA area, and it was NOT FUN. At one point, the GPS told me I was out of route (even though I did what it said), and when I hit “Reroute” it sent me off the freeway and through Hollywood to get back on track. That took a few years off my life. The freeway is bad enough, with rush hour traffic and people who don’t know how to merge and don’t have a healthy fear of trucks or respect for their own or anyone else’s lives. I can handle that, though. Moving straight forward is easy. But driving a truck on congested city streets is like navigating a giant spaceship through an asteroid field, if asteroids had middle fingers. Apparently the GPS wanted me to get some shifting practice. My trainer says that I maneuver the truck well, I’m safe and aware and laid back, but that shifting is the one thing I still need work on. Downshifting is supposed to be the hard part, but I’m pretty smooth with that. But upshifting for me is like arm wrestling with a rusty robot. That doesn’t mix well with California’s bumpy, broken-down roads. The one good thing about the roads is that the lines are painted so badly they look like Stevie Wonder’s musical notation, so they don’t put you to sleep. As soon as I crossed over into Arizona, the perfectly painted lines started to hypnotize me. So I’m done driving for the night. There’s a lot I’d like to do in California, it’s a beautiful place (minus Oakland). But I want to go there in a car.

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