Profile For Kevin L.

Kevin L.'s Info

  • Location:
    Scranton, PA

  • Driving Status:
    Rookie Solo Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    11 months, 3 weeks ago

Kevin L.'s Bio

I have held a Class A chauffeurs license prior to the CDLs. I later went to CDL school at Porter's Drive Rite at the time it was located in Glen Burnie, Maryland and earned my Class A CDL. I worked several jobs back then driving a box truck before moving to NJ and Driving a tractor trailer for a while then dump trucks. I changed careers a couple times and ended up working for a major university for the past decade or so. That job paid for my daughter to get a great education. Recently I found a need to take on a second job just to make ends meet. That pressed me to go out and get one with a School Bus company. The bus I drive is equipped with air brakes and an air seat which made me realize how much I missed driving a truck. It is a 2015 IC 3000 CE series I believe. Now that my daughter is graduating I am looking to go back into trucking to make more money until I retire. I am preparing to go to orientation at Maverick Transportation Feb 2018.

Kevin L.'s Photo Gallery

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Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

View Topic:

Renting a truck to get CDL

When I read this the first thing that came to mind was when I went to get my school bus endorsement I had to retest in a school bus. The company I was going to work for happened to be a state authorized testing center as well. They offer for a fee the use of their bus or tractor trailer for an additional fee as well as give you the test. Your state may have similar testing agencies as well.

As far as a 160 hour certificate goes I am unfamiliar with it. I can tell you there are some companies out here that will hire you and train more than that in house between time in orientation, classroom and driving time prior to you going solo. Actual driving is where you will see most improvements.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Working For Maverick

Yes they sure are governed to 65 mph. I was playing around with the 8/2 split and crossed the midnight threshold as well as a timeline that day. I also remember I had to do a safe haven move and the closest safe place happened to be the receiver but here’s an image of the Qualcomm that covered my high day.

I just wish all the OTR loads were 700-1000 plus miles and regional or dedicated ran the short runs. This company seems to give out a lot of runs under 800 miles to people out for weeks or months at a time.

0955533001533986661.jpg

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working For Maverick

Yes thank you for asking. I still love being in this division. I drive whatever is left on my 70. I have gotten only one reset since I started. I’m not seeing any shortage of miles. I am still averaging over 300 take home pay more than when when I was in USA flatbed.

However, they just gave a raise to flatbed and had I stayed it may have made a difference. Either way I’m regularly clearing more than the gauranteed gross weekly pay.

My high mileage day here in tcd is 759.6 not bad for one day from a rookie. We all have good days but I didn’t think that many miles in a day but now my goal is to break 800

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working For Maverick

I was not done with the post but I will continue here. There seems to be very few people on this forum from Maverick. Of the ones I know of they all have multiple years experience in trucking and likely from other companies as well.

When a new person came on here asking about what to expect when they got to North Little Rock and how they could excel in training there I honestly thought that the best person to reply would be by someone who recently lived the experience. Not someone who may have a decade or two experience with other companies that may have entirely different ideas of how to train a person to drive.

I really do not want to press any issues about earnings potential between types of trucking. I can and did express my personal experience and felt like I was called incompetent because I pointed out that I make substantially more since I switched divisions and several people load and unload my truck while We both get paid to get it unloaded me to back up and open doors them to load and secure. It leaves me all that time to drive instead of burning up my clock

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working For Maverick

First the good news six months ago today I was offered a job at Maverick Transportation. I survived.

It has been a few weeks since I posted on here. To be honest I was not sure If I should even remain a member of this site. I believe in being honest and stating things clearly. I realize I’m not even close to having the level of experience many on here have. I understand that the mega carriers are good at business. I know that I’m still learning a lot of basic things other drivers may take for granted.

HOWEVER, I have noticed on this forum that there are only a very small handful of drivers that work ofor Maverick.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

I'm confused, need an answer

If you are driving a modern school bus many of them are equipped with air brakes. You may already be able to drive that with a class b dsl. However like Brett said if you want to upgrade to class a to drive a class a bus such as the ones big cities use that bend in the middle. Many states consider them class a. Every state I know of requires to take the road and skills test in a vehicle that is the type you wish to be licensed for. If you looking to drive tractor trailer you would need to do the pretrial skills and road tests in a tractor trailer. In my state anyhow I had my class a prior to getting school bus and passenger endorsements and was still required to retest kin a school bus and if it did not bend in the middle They put a restriction against driving a class a bus on my cdl It may sound confusing but it is different in each state.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

I've been accepted to Maverick! Any other Mavericks with opinions?

That’s an interesting perspective about none paying more than another. Could you then explain how as a company driver getting paid the exact same cpm and detention, breakdown pay in flatbed or tcd. Financially I’m only seeing two differences bettween the division that is stop pay and tarp pay. When you look at the amount of work required of a flatbed driver especially in the first year and compare it to the work expected from a tcd driver that does very little other than drive. Which if you get paid by the mile and detention pay at the same rate seems to me that the tcd driver would make more.

Keep in mind the flatbed driver does a lot of work when they arrive at a shipper or consignee that a tcd driver can pretty much open the doors back up to a dock and go in sleeper berth till the phone rings telling him to come get his paperwork. Then put in an empty call and go to the next shipper and repeat. All the time a flatbed driver spends loading unloading and tarping are hours off his 14/70 hour clocks limiting his hour to drive and be paid.

Granted there are people that can get loaded secured and tarred well under the 2 hour detention threshold and who can do it fast enough to still get good miles in but that is not what most rookies experience.

To say that the only reason a person makes less with one type of freight than another is because they are underperforming at one is rediculas. The two different types of freight have different responsibilities. More work is expected of a flatbed driver then a tcd driver.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

I've been accepted to Maverick! Any other Mavericks with opinions?

You guys are correct I am still a rookie. That is why a new driver should be able to relate to my experience with the company. I would like to know if there are any other drivers on here that have less than 6 months experience and work for Maverick are getting 2800-3000miles avg per week on USA flatbed. During our orientation we were told things like the average driver will make 60-85k their first year. From what I saw in the driver portal a few weeks ago those numbers are more along the top drivers numbers and I did not see any of those listed as being under a yr exp.

I do believe good money can be made in all forms of trucking. I also believe companies are out to make money. There is a lot of truth in the statement if the wheels ain’t turning you ain’t earning. I’m all for drivers improving their driving skills and making more money because of it. My problem was all the work that is not paid for that burns up your 14 hour clock. The idea that even if you can setup, get loaded, secure, and tarp every load in under 2 hours you make 12.50 an hr if it goes 3 or more hours it’s sub minimum wage.

You are all correct there is no universal form of trucking for everyone in fact trucking is not for everyone. One rookie to another I would say ask the questions you need in orientation. I have stayed in touch with a few drivers from my graduation we started feb 4 and all that are in flatbed are tracking for about 34k this year.

I came to trucking to get out of debt and make a better life I want to do it as fast as I can. My first full week in TCD I made more than any regular work week in flatbed. My weekly miles was just under double what I was doing in flatbed. For me it was the right choice. Also in tcd I’m not cooking the e logs or working 80-95 hours a week either. I get plenty of rest in fact often It’s hard for me to wait to start driving again.

Maverick is a great company to work for. As with any job though you need to determine what is the best fit for you. The training for tcd is only two days. Always Thursday and Friday. You will be assigned a different truck then flatbed.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

I've been accepted to Maverick! Any other Mavericks with opinions?

I drive for Maverick. I’m pretty new to it. I went flatbed about five months before switching to tcd. I have found tcd suits me better personally. It’s really a personal choice. I started there as a student. I have had my cdl class a for a long time but no recent verifiable experience. When I switched from flatbed USA to tcd I’m receiving exactly the same pay per mile. The main difference for me is with tcd I get a lot more miles because I don’t spend as much time loading securing and tarping . Flatbed got paid tarp pay of $25 and $30 for stop pay you also will be paid detention time over 2 hours if multi stop TCD pays the same on detention but only 20 stop pay. Tcd is far less work than flatbed. I may not be the best example but my first week in TCD I did 2618 miles which is more Than I was getting in flatbed. Also if you got flatbed USA expect to work primarily in the region you live in.

To be prepared get a motor carriers deluxe atlas, a hand calculator, dry erase marker fine point, straight edge or small ruler, minimal items and clothing to get by on about 2weeks. A set of twin sheets or sleeping bag, some cash for food after lunch or Walmart trips. Practice Trip planning, try and get familiar with HOS and FMCSR mainly relating to hos. Pay close attention to the instructors ask questions for clarity. Always try and be about 15-30 minutes early. Don’t bring anything that might be seen as offensive or dangerous. No alcohol, we had one guy sent home because his shirt had skulls on it but I think he was warned and did it twice.

For me it was about 2 weeks orientation and securement then 3 1/2 weeks in a trainer truck then on my own. Once your on your own you will want to make you truck as much like home as you can without modifying their truck. Trust me it can add up fast.

Working at Maverick my not be perfect but they will work with you and you can learn a lot. Be safe hope to see you out here

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Old School, Turtle, and all youz Flatbedders out there....

I was told the lumber tarps are 170 lbs and the steel tarps are 140 but the canvas tarps feel more like 40 lbs. I did see a girl the was probably 95 pounds soaking wet put a lumber tarp on the bed of a truck. Keep in mind you still have to throw straps and use chains and bungee the tarps down as well. Stretching out 150 -200 bungees is a workout in itself. It’s not just the tarps though proper setup and secure meant are time consuming. I know where there is a will there is a way. I’m a large man of 6’ 1” 230 lbs and just switched from flatbed to temp control because the work was so intense I didn’t have enough time to drive and make the money I wanted. Good luck either way be safe.

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

My work update

I figured it was time to update you all. As you may know I’ve been driving flatbed. Well like most people I guess the grass always looks greener on the other side. I’m coming upon my six month mark with this company and had my share of mishaps along the way. I found myself giving everything I felt I could for this job even breaking my log on several occasions. At one point I had some issues with my fleet manager who was angry with me for shutting down with 2:11 left on my 70 hour clock in my third week of recaps. I managed to treat him respectfully while disagreeing with him yet calling him sir repeatedly.

That upset me and had me looking to quit. Instead I thought about why I was so unhappy and realized it was because of the pay and the amount of work to earn it. I know I did and could get faster but securing and tarping was taking away from my abuility to drive and make more money.

I determined flatbed may not be for me and spoke to the company about their tcd division. I went through two days of training and got assigned a different truck and trailer last Friday my first two loads total about the same miles as my high mileage week of driving flatbed plus it’s likely I will get about another 1k before this week ends. I was also assigned a new fleet manager it is like night and day. And I still work for the same company. And for the first time I’m not afraid of dot or scales as I know my weights are good after scaling every load . Also I’m running much more detailed logs spending a lot of time in sleeper berth

Posted:  4 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Restoring cdl

I have been talking to another driver here in PA and we have been debating what he will need to do to get his cdl back. I have an idea but he has another so I want to ask here and find out for certain.

He had a Pennsylvania class A cdl when he drove a regular car and broke enough laws he had his license suspended for one year that began last July. His CDL expired in December. Now he knows he will need to pay a restitution fee but he thinks that’s all he needs to do or pay. I think he will need to pay the renewal fees and may need to retest entirely as it will have been expired over 6 months by the time he can have it reinstated. Can some of you out there please clarify the process.

Posted:  4 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

HOS for new people

Thank you for all the replies. Yes I am still with Maverick and I believe they have treated me very well overall. Brett is right that my own stinking thinking is a problem I have been working through. The idea of putting down 15 min for no tarp and 20 min if tarp will solve the 70 hour problem. But it will create another problem as if I don’t get faster soon at this I may not be able to get proper rest either. I spent probably about 5 or 6 hours just getting loaded and securing a load of slinky’s in the pouring rain Friday. Simply because I was uncertain of what I had to do watched a video for 6 mins then did it. I was at a shipper that does not allow you on the trailer. This is my first load of slinky’s and I have 15 of them going to NC from CT. Once I got rolling it was rush hour through nyc. Got as far as bordentown NJ for a 34 now made it to emporia va today. I have been thinking maybe glass or reefer is a better fit but have to give flatbed a fair chance in my head. I have mixed feelings about the pay in general because I’m used to being paid for my time at work not just half or less of the time.it really is a change in mindset as well as lifestyle.

Posted:  4 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

HOS for new people

How do you view your HOS when your new to flatbed for example? It goes for all forms of trucking but when you get paid by the mile your not paid hourly for securing or tarping or double tarping other then maybe a small tarping pay maybe. As a new person it can easily take several hours to properly secure a load even longer if it has to be tarred. Experience will make you faster at it but that really just reduces the basically free time you give to the company. Even if you just take the time you need to do it right then you blow out your 14 or 70 hour clock and then can’t drive. If the wheels are not turning you are not making any money.

My fleet manager basically wants to see as few hours on duty not driving as possible. I see off duty as free to do as I please just like I can at home. I have come to a conclusion that even with eld we are expected to alter our actual hours worked to suit others needs but I just don’t know how much.

Posted:  5 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Need a bit of encouragement today

I agree with the going to a company sponsored training program. I would suggest researching different companies to find one that offers the type of trucks, cargo, training, environment as well as commitment. It is always best to not leave your first company within the first year some may have less commitment than others. Also you may look for hidden expenses and training pay. For example I drive flatbed. The company I work for provides drivers with everything they need to properly secure a load. I have been told that is not always the case with all companies. Also, keep in mind not all companies require training as a team driver (where one sleeps while the other drives).

Best of luck be safe

Posted:  5 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

CDL Permit Holders Getting All Endorsements?

Just to reiterate these points.

I just showed a birth certificate with an official seal and a valid Illinois Drivers Lisence and I was good to go. Name on the DL and BC must match identically.

That is interesting. My CDL lists my middle initial but my birth certificate lists my full name. I applied for a passport and used my CDL AND Birth certificate as ID and put on the application for the passport my middle initial so it would match my CDL. Then when I got my TWIC only required the passport for ID (CDL was optional) the lady was going to put my full name on my twic application until I pointed out the middle initial was optional and both my passport and CDL only listed the initial. Now all my ID has only middle initial except my birth certificate.

Posted:  5 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Charter bus does not count as experience?

I think you may have found one of those companies that does not want to accept any training other than their own. Class B motor coach drives different than a straight truck or a school bus for that matter. The is also a difference between OTR and local driving. Another thing to consider is driving bus your cargo loads and unloads itself unlike a truck.

I drove straight trucks for plumbing supply houses for years when I was younger. I left the industry for over a decade. It was not till last year I drove a school bus for about 6 months. Now I drive a flatbed class A truck. The pay is far better but you will work for every bit of it.

I would suggest you simply apply elsewhere and keep your head up you will find something if you don’t give up. If you want to become more marketable simply work on improving and protecting your CDL. The more you can drive the more valuable and versatile you are to business.

Posted:  5 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working for Coke

I think we all go through similar experiences. If you would have asked I’m sure others would have told you driving for food and beverage companies can be very physical work. I went flatbed and can tell you it is far more work than I expected. Especially when I came to the realization I only get paid for driving all other work is not compensated as I get paid by the mile. I had to look at it from a bigger picture my weekly paycheck is for everything I do. If you stick with it you will find faster easier ways to do it and make more money. Most people around here will tell you to stick it out for a year minimum. Personally, I strive for 6 months right now. If I can make it 6 months I will work on 8 or 9 then I believe I will have my own system down and just keep going. From what I see around here coke and Pepsi are union jobs and money can be made there.

Posted:  5 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Slipseat boxes

How many of you remember having boxes with your electronic equipment installed in it so you could easily carry and setup your cb or radio in the truck. Maybe you would be in more truck in a day or a week? I ask this because I have been thinking about a particular two way radio I dont think will fit in the overhead compartment of my assigned truck. The company has a rule prohibiting drivers from installing cb radios. I understand this is to prevent damage or modifications to their trucks. I completely agree with said rule and have no intention of modifying their property. I was considering having them install the antennas and me building a slipseat box then simply connecting to the wires overhead to the box which could be secured to a seat base with a bungee cord. I could also simply get power from a 12v outlet. I’m not sure if that would be frowned upon by the company or not as long as their property is not damaged. I was thinking of putting a cb a scanner a gps maybe a car stereo in the box that could be connected with appropriate leads.

Posted:  5 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Qualififed - Account Approvals

Back in the days when I was driving straight trucks for supply houses, many of them would lease trucks from Ryder. Even though I was paid by the supply house I had to go through additional testing with Ryder to be qualified to operate their leased trucks. Ryder actually issued the drivers cards certifying us if we ever got pulled over. We were supposed to provide police with in addition to our license. Their testing usually was simply a depth perception eye test a hearing test and a basic driving skills road test. I can imagine things may have changed but that practice may be common among large leasing companies as well.

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