Profile For Jeff V.

Jeff V.'s Info

  • Location:
    San Diego, CA

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    6 years, 6 months ago

Jeff V.'s Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Page 1 of 1

Posted:  4 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Petroleum Driving Advice Needed

Howdy All!

Thank you andhe78 and all for your insights. It was the kind of advice for which I was looking.

I came across one company who will train new employees in their unique fuel handling techniques. They said that the training cost a certain amount. Each month, they would take $200 off this mysterious amount. (The $200 wasn't deducted from the employee's paycheck.) After 25 months, the amount would be "paid." If the new employee left before 25 months, they would owe whatever was left of this mysterious amount. It sounds like a "2-year contract" just worded differently. Is this a common practice in the fuel transport industry?

Staying as local as I can is important to me. In that vein, I haven't discovered many local jobs that have the potential for earning $100K. Some delivery drivers (food, drinks, some freight) can make that much, but there's A LOT of fast-paced, physical labor involved. Yes, I've observed that fuel transport drivers move large hoses, but those with whom I've talked, say it's not that bad. At one company where I applied, an employee said that about 20 of his co-workers were going to top $100K.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I'm looking for an area of trucking that is 1) Local, 2) Has $100K potential, and 3) Is as stable as possible. (I'm OK with physical labor, I'm just trying not to overdo it.) It seems from my limited research that fuel transport fits those desires. (Yes, personal satisfaction with the type of work I'm doing is also important. But, I get a lot of personal satisfaction when I become efficient and productive in challenging situations that require professional driving skills. That's ANOTHER point that attracts me to fuel transport.)

So...I always appreciate experienced advice in case I'm overlooking an important, unknown factor.

ABUNDANCE!!

Jeff V.

Posted:  4 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Petroleum Driving Advice Needed

Howdy Again!

I've been doing some research for a possible move into hauling petroleum locally/regionally. I would like some feedback from those with experience driving fuel locally/regionally.

I live in SoCal, but I'm looking for some general advice. For example, I'm trying to compare hourly wage vs. "pay by the day"/"activity based pay". I'm making about $20 an hour hauling double 28' and single 48' reefers for a food service company. (Overtime after 8 and 40.) From what I can gather fuel haulers around here make between $22-$28 an hour, or $250-$275 a day (gross).

Also, I currently work between 35-45 hours a week (4 days a week). I would like to work 5 days a week to make that extra income.

So...I would like...1) Testimonials on the income potential of fuel hauling (hourly vs. activity based pay), and the general...2) Pro's & Con's of working in this area of trucking.

Thanks you'all!

Jeff V.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Being a Felon & Getting a truck driving job

Howdy Again

I just wanted to say that I've moved on from the paving company after a year with them.

I took the advice of the different members of this forum and stayed with my initial company for a year. When I was ready to try to get semi-tractor/trailer experience, I told the owner of the paving company about my goals. He was supportive of my career plans.

After a few rejections, I got a job working for a food service company hauling double reefers ("drop & hook") to their hubs in southern California. I've been working here for a couple of months.

My criminal background came up in the initial interview. The hiring manager said that the nature of my crimes would not prevent me from doing the job, so he hired me.

I'm still on parole, but my PO actually approved my job change even though this job causes me to travel out of the county on a daily basis.

I now have more income AND benefits. It is also giving me the valuable freeway & city driving experience that I will need when I can work OTR or Regionally.

I hope my progress can inspired someone else to either start a trucking career or to keep trying to improve even with obstacles.

Jeff V.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

No company will hire a R.S.O.

Howdy Folks.

Just wanted to give you'all a progress report.

After I'd worked for the paving company for about a year, I told the owner of the company that I would like to get into hauling freight. He was supportive of my career goals and gave me his "blessing."

Since I didn't have semi-tractor/trailer experience, I wasn't sure how my job hunt was going to go. After a few rejections, I found a food service company that needed a shuttle driver ("drop & hook") hauling double reefers to their different hubs in CA.

My criminal background came up in the initial interview and I was transparent about it. When the hiring manager found out that it didn't involve something like theft or drunken driving, he said that it wasn't something that would prevent me from getting the job and he hired me!

As I mentioned, I'm still on parole and my PO approved the new job, even though it caused me to travel out of the county on a daily basis.

I've been working at Saladinos for a couple of months. It's still considered "local" work (hourly) but I do get about 1000 miles a week of freeway & city driving experience.

My goal is to eventually haul flatbed either OTR, or Regionally. In the meantime, I'm getting valuable experience even though I'm "limited" to local driving.

I hope this encourages someone.

Thanks for all your support.

Jeff V.

Posted:  6 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Being a Felon & Getting a truck driving job

Amen!

I would like to add my two cents to this topic.

I was released from prison in 2016 and I'm still on parole. I got a grant to go to truck school about 14 months later. I got my CDL in January 2018 and five days after passing the driving exam, I got a full-time job ($20 an hour, $30 an hour overtime, 35-45 hrs a week, 6a-3p, M-F).

I was living in a van after leaving prison. Once I got this job, I was able to rent an apartment. I paid cash for a nice, solid car and my checking account grows every payday.

I just saw three signs advertising for Class A drivers in the industrial section where I work. I would imagine there are also trucking jobs in many communities that are not widely advertised.

Be encouraged, my friend.

Abundance,

Jeff V.

Posted:  6 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

No company will hire a R.S.O.

Good afternoon folks

Thanks for all of your encouragement. This TT family is tight regardless of our individual peccadilloes.

Thanks Big Scott for the CFI tip. Since I'm on parole, (limited to San Diego county) I will have to wait until parole is over before venturing out of the local area. BUT, I plan to stretch out as much as I can until then.

I had a good day at work today after a 4-day, holiday weekend. (There ARE a few benefits to being "forced" to stay local. smile.gif ) One of my responsibilities is to get an equipment trailer to the job site. I had two back-up's in traffic today; one strong-side, one blind-side, and I nailed both of them on the first try. Boy, that feels good!

For all those who might feel like there aren't many options locally, I saw three signs in one block of our industrial section advertising for Class A drivers. Whenever I see those, I like to contact my trucking school so that they can pass on those job leads to other graduates. I would imagine there are also Class A jobs in many communities that aren't widely advertised.

Well you'all, I say again, you keep me motivated to enjoy my current job, and inspired and prepared for those future opportunities.

Abundance,

Jeff V.

Posted:  6 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

No company will hire a R.S.O.

Hello everyone

I've been viewing this and other TT forums for about a year and a half. All of you guys (and gals) have given me some good insight into the trucking industry. Thanks a bunch.

I'm not sure if this is the spot to tell my story, but it relates to the topic.

I spent 13 years, 9 months and 24 days in prison in CA for sexual crimes. I was released in 2016 and I'm still on parole.

I was determined to get my Class A right out of prison. Unfortunately, I had to put that dream on hold while I survived the outside world. After about a year and a half of doing day-labor jobs, temporary part-time jobs and even more permanent part-time jobs while living in a van, I was able to get a grant from a career center to go to CDL training school. I worked during the day and went to school at night.

Besides that challenge, the private trucking school I attended lost its lease on their practice lot. So, we had to learn the driving skills in low-light vacant lots and back streets. Despite all these obstacles, I pasted my CDL driving exam on the first attempt.

Five days later, I got a full-time job at a local asphalt paving company driving a dump truck. The company is aware of my background but they were willing to take a chance on me. (I've made such a good impression over the last three months that they kept me and fired another driver who tried to get me fired by talking about my past to co-workers.)

Due to my increase in income, I'm now able to afford an apartment.

Another miraculous side note: During my school, I passed the endorsement exams for Doubles/Triples, Tanks and Hazmat. But wait, Hazmat requires a TSA background check. Sure enough, my crimes were dis-qualifiers for that endorsement. HOWEVER, they offered me a chance to request a waiver to this disqualification which I did.

TSA required a long list of documentation in order to prove my level of rehabilitation. Even though I tried to collect them, all I eventually sent were 6 letters: my explanation of the circumstances of my crimes and rehabilitation activities, four letters of reference, and my explanation why I couldn't acquire the other papers. I didn't have much hope for a waiver, but my attitude was, "If I don't request a waiver, the answer is definitely 'No'. But, if I do request one, at least there's a CHANCE I could get approved."

About a month went by without a word. However, during that time, TSA went to the effort of looking up my new parole agent to ask about me. Lo and behold, they granted me a waiver! Thus, I'm an RSO with a Class A license with Doubles/Triples, Tanks AND a Hazmat endorsement. The job I have now doesn't need Hazmat, but I hope to use it when I apply to a regional or OTR carrier when I get off parole.

So, that's my story. I hope it encourages anyone else with a VERY colorful background to keep pursuing their dreams.

Thanks again for all your tips and inspiration.

Jeff V.

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