Profile For David John

David John's Info

  • Location:
    San Diego, CA

  • Driving Status:
    Company Driver In Training

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  • Joined Us:
    1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Posted:  5 minutes ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

Wonderful photo.
Color!
and the incredible cloud formations we see out there ...

Posted:  1 hour, 33 minutes ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

There is definitely a “pace” when working through rehab.
Push yourself, but listen carefully to physical therapists in setting limits.
Pain in this case can be your body telling you enough, just now.
And pushing too hard can cause setbacks.

Best of luck with your recovery.
Looking forward to the pic... 🙂

Posted:  23 hours, 40 minutes ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

Fall is here and with it incredible views. Incredible Fall colors. I am looking forward to views, as these, in the Rockies and incredible views in the East and elsewhere.

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Posted:  1 day ago

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When God Made Truck Drivers ...

An interesting read this morning ...

Have a safe and productive day all!

When God Made Truck Drivers

When the Lord was creating Truck Drivers, He was into his sixth day of overtime when an angel appeared and said,
"You're doing a lot of fiddling around on this one."

And the Lord said,
"Have you read the spec on this order?"

"A truck driver has to be able to drive 10-12 hours per day, through any type of weather, on any type of road, know the highway traffic laws of 48 states and 10 provinces, he has to be ready and able to unload 40,000 lbs of cargo after driving thru the night, sleep in areas of cities and towns that the police refuse to patrol."

"He has to be able to live in his truck 24 hours a day 7 days a week for weeks on end, offer first aid and motorist assistance to his fellow travelers, meet just in time schedules, and still maintain an even and controlled composure when all around him appear to have gone mad."

"He has to be in top physical condition at all times, running on black coffee and half-eaten meals; he has to have six pairs of hands."

The angel shook her head slowly and said, "Six pairs of hands... no way."

“It's not the hands that are causing me problems," said the Lord, "it's the three pairs of eyes a driver has to have."

"That's on the standard model?" asked the angel.

The Lord nodded.
"One pair that sees the herd of deer in the thickets 3 miles away"
"Another pair here in the side of his head for the blind spots that motorists love to hide in;
“and another pair of eyes here in front that can look reassuringly at the bleeding victim of a drunk driver that crashed into his ICC bumper at 70MPH and say, " 'You'll be all right ma'am,' when he knows it isn't so."

"Lord," said the angel, touching his sleeve, "rest and work on this tomorrow."

"I can't," said the Lord, "I already have a model that can drive 650 miles a day, without incident and can raise a family of five without ever seeing them, on 30 cents a mile."

The angel circled the model of the truck driver very slowly, "Can it think?", she asked.

"You bet," said the Lord. "It can tell you the elements of every HAZMAT load invented; recite Federal Motor Carrier Regulations rules and regs in its sleep; deliver, pickup, be a father, offer timely advice to strangers, search for missing children, defend a woman's or children's rights, get 8 hours of good rest on the street and raise a family of Law respecting citizens, without ever going home ... and still it keeps its sense of humor. "

"This driver also has phenomenal personal control. He can deal with delivery and pickup areas created from scenes painted in hell, coax a lumper to actually work for his money, comfort an accident victim's family, and then read in the daily paper how truck drivers are nothing more than killers on wheels and have no respect for the rights of others while using the nations highways."

Finally, the angel bent over and ran her finger across the cheek of the driver. "There's a leak," she pronounced.
"I told you that you were trying to put too much into this model."

"That's not a leak," said the lord, "it's a tear."

"What's the tear for?", asked the angel.

"It's for bottled-up emotions, for fallen comrades, for commitment to that funny piece of cloth called the flag, for justice, for the family without its father."

"You're a genius," said the angel.

The Lord looked somber. "I didn't put it there,"

— Author Unknown

Posted:  4 days ago

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My Maverick Transportation Diary

Jeramy, I am enjoying your Maverick thread. Thank you for posting! I also appreciated your comments, to me, elsewhere previously. I too am finding the input and guidance on this site invaluable. A supportive ‘community’. The comparison of all that you are doing, as it parallels my experience, is helpful.

Larry,
The only state I’m aware of that requires additional testing upon transferring an out of state CDL to a different state is Illinois. Other states just require you to go in and pay your fees.
—Rob T.

Rob T., California will require a person to take all written tests when transferring a CDL from another state.

For me this would have involved taking all written tests in Arizona and then returning a couple weeks later and taking all written tests in California. It would have also resulted in paying all licensing fees in both states, within a few weeks.

Fortunately I learned that for a student training to become a CDL-A holder in California, this process, it is possible to obtain a California CDL permit before going to Driver Training School. I took all written tests in California and obtained the California CDL permit.
Then I went to Phoenix Arizona, using my California CDL permit, and completed class and driver training in Arizona. After completing training and passing my driving test I provided my Arizona driving test results (via CSTIMS, a National Database the DMV used to obtain the results) to the California DMV for the purpose of completing my CDL permit / California CDL License transition. The California DMV accepted the driver test results from Arizona. I believe states are required by Federal Mandate to accept driver training/testing results from other states. (Though this is the case, one school explained that some states still do not accept results from elsewhere, Illinois may be one.)

Posted:  5 days, 21 hours ago

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A Day In The Life of a Walmart Dedicated Driver

Very enjoyable read (and thread). Thank you G-Town!

Posted:  5 days, 23 hours ago

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Parallel Back--Advice needed

One thing that may help.

Realize that knocking over the center back cone costs 2 points.

Poking the tractor wheels slightly through the blind side of the box will cost 2+ points.

Points can add up quickly, but ...

The goal is to get it perfect and complete the driving range without losing a single point.

However, for the exam, you are allowed 11 points total that you may lose (ie. points to give up) and still pass the test.

You must have the tractor/trailer completely inside the box when you finish. Being outside costs 10 points and is likely a fail.

In the real world you may not have the ability to push outside the limits of the box (ie. “lose points”), but in the real world you will have the ability to do as many GOAL (get out and looks) and pull-ups as you need.
And in the real world you will further develop your skills to the point those GOALs and pull-ups will become limited to only what is necessary for an experienced driver.

During driver training, losing 2 points by pushing past the back cone may help by giving you the additional space you need to align yourself in the box perfectly. 2 points to save from losing 10...

Knowing this relieved me of a certain amount of pressure/stress during this maneuver. Getting it absolutely perfect is possible, but given the time available for practice (and in our case using different range locations) made perfection a bit harder.

Note: the examiner will not allow you to continue driving through the back cone (or side). They will stop you when you begin to drive out of the box, but knocking the back cone over and then pulling forward to straighten gives you a few extra feet in front.

The Recipie provided by the instructor does work. Almost. Use that sequence of turns and the sequence of pictures the instructor provided.

THEN Learn to adjust things slightly.

Develop an understanding of how the tractor and trailer are moving.
How the back of the trailer is entering the box. (driver side)
How the back of the tractor is entering the box. (blind side)

When you are straight and backing the tractor/trailer into the box, watch the trailer tires and learn how deep they can go in. Then understand the movement of the trailer tires (and back of trailer) relative to the driver side of the box when you are backing the tractor down into the box.

When you turn the tractor to “push” the back of the tractor into the box, watch the trailer tires again, and their movement. Note here also that you need to be watching the blind side tractor tires ALSO to get a feel for where they need to end up before you try to “dive” the front of the tractor into the box.

When backing the tractor tires into the box, before diving the steer tires into the front of the box, I would often go a bit too far. My instructor gave us driver side tire/line points of reference regarding our halt when backing the tractor tires into the box. Watching the driver side in this instance took away my sense of how the tractor was moving toward the far side of the box. That loss of reference caused difficulty in developing my sense of how to adjust when things were not quite perfect.

When backing, for some, the recipie (sequence of turns and pictures) will work perfectly every time. This was not the case for me. In developing an understanding of how the trailer and tractor were moving relative to one another and relative to their desired positions in the box, I was able to begin to learn how to make adjustments.

Posted:  1 week ago

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Sometimes We Do Whatever It Takes

Safe travels! It will be fun to say Hello sometime, out on the road.

Posted:  1 week ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

😃

Posted:  1 week ago

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Sometimes We Do Whatever It Takes

I ran a load of Aluminum beams from Delhi, LA to San Diego, CA this week. ....snip...

One more thing... As I was driving back to Delhi my dispatcher calls and says, "Hurry back in if you can. I've got another load headed to that same customer ..."

Old School, if you are heading back to San Diego and you have time for lunch/coffee/etc. I would enjoy the opportunity to meet and say Hello!

Depending on the day/time, it should be possible for me to drive (pretty much anywhere in San Diego) to connect.

Posted:  1 week ago

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Anyone pay for CDL to get local/regional job?

Thankfully, recommendation taken on this, without previously having all of the information. During discussion in school it was understood this was a hard account. It was not understood to be as hard as described here. Given the opportunity I would (more than I did) encourage my class mates to read things said on this site.
As a rookie OTR driver (to be), given what I have read, I will likely choose to take heat from the dispatcher rather than agree to one of these runs. Yikes.

Following the additional reading Old School suggested, regarding the Dollar Store accounts, and finding input from many of the experienced drivers who contribute on this site ... two Rookie Solo Driver’s summed things up rather well.

“I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS FOR NEW DRIVERS.
YOU WILL EITHER HIT SOMETHING
OR QUIT AND HAVE TO LOOK FOR ANOTHER JOB.”
— Steven

“And the CONSENSUS is ..........
drum roll please ..............
don't walk away from this opportunity ..........
RUN FOR YOU LIFE!!!”
— Tractor Man

One such thread...

Dollar Store Accounts are incredibly hard, especially without experience

Posted:  1 week ago

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Anyone pay for CDL to get local/regional job?

I believe a lot will depend on your location.

I am not planning on staying local as I believe much that has been said in previous posts. I do have an interest in being home multiple times a week (nightly?) however and have had my antenna twitch when presented with these opportunities. Perhaps I will consider local in future.

It might pay to talk with the truck driver training school in your area. Many here will (correctly) tell you that the school will tell you anything to get you to train with them. This is a possibility. However, you may be able to look at a “hiring board” and see announcements from hiring companies. You could take a list of names and check out the companies and their posted hiring positions on-line. The better driver training schools will be able to back up what they tell you with data. These 5 companies XYZ, ABC, ... are hiring new CDL drivers directly out of school. AND ... We had ## students from our school hired into each of the companies in the past 6 months/1 year.

While at this school I learned of a number of companies that this school trains drivers for...
In this case the company itself would hire NON-CDL individuals and hire the truck driver training school to train them to be drivers. In Phoenix there were a few, but the big one at the time was CalPortland a concrete delivery (and other construction related products) company.

There are a number of local dairy and foods related companies who hire product delivery drivers and then offer the opportunity to transition into CDL-A after the first year.

One fuel tanker company, Coastal, was also open to hiring (and did hire) students directly from one of their approved CDL schools. (I believe folks on this site would strongly recommend against tanker and especially HAZMAT tanker in the first year. I am inclined to agree. But Coastal is doing this. You can find information on Coastal’s website.)

I am also aware of some “pseudo-local” positions that are available at present. One national carrier had a route Phoenix-San Diego, daily. The truck would drive back and forth. The driver would be away from home every other night and then home weekends.

I am also aware of the fact that a number of national carriers are looking to fill driving positions in the “Dollar” store area. Dollar General, Family Dollar, etc. These positions were described as home nightly, or nearly so. The discussion among students and instructors lead me to believe this would be an easier load/unload situation but one in which many stops would be involved and each stop would very likely present very unique arrival and parking challenges.

I think with research you’ll find local opportunities that might work. But take care in considering if this is the time to begin.

I believe Old School’s and Rainy’s pictures to be real and realistic and something to consider seriously when understanding how these challenges will play out at present.

I hear that the first year in this industry is the hardest. So much to learn. Drinking from the fire hose. And just a process where we are developing our endurance, creativity and patience.

Taking on this incredible new challenge may not be a problem for you.
But taking it on at this moment, with other life challenges, compound the difficulties you will face and may make it harder.

Best Wishes!

Posted:  1 week ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

The picture you mention was taken by Chris Burkhard, a photographer who inspires.

That particular picture was taken in Switzerland, I believe.

Chris’ images caught my attention before I went through the process of considering ‘Pure Joy’, as mentioned.
He later did this Ted Talk which struck a chord ...

“Every photograph is precious ... “
- Chris Burkhard

Pure Joy, Chris Burkhard - TedTalk

I have seen some of these places, or similar. He captures in a photo what I see and feel.

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Posted:  1 week, 1 day ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

And my profile picture. A place where I find Peace, Happiness, ... Joy.

I spent some time considering this, what is ‘Happiness’, what is ‘Perfect Peace’ and perhaps ‘Pure Joy’.
For me, it seems, we are all in search of something. In search of happiness.
The question was, for me, what is that something?

Following quite a bit of thought I came to the realization that perfect happiness, peace and that joy I am searching for, may be seen as an instant in time. A few seconds in the day.

When standing outside, of an evening, waiting and watching for a sunset. A time without a need to hurry or be anywhere. A time of waiting. While watching the sunset I tend to see varying stages of “pretty”. It develops to a point where the colors are incredible, the view (and pictures others post) are amazing. There is a point where everything is perfect. And then from that point the colors continue changing and while still beautiful, are somewhat less so. Then the time comes where the stomach growls, or you begin to get cold or you realize you must be somewhere else. A time where perfection has passed and the present and ‘moving on’ is calling loudly.

For me the point of perfect peace, pure Joy, is found at that instant of perfection while viewing a Sunset. This can be a sunset at the beach or on a mountain. The natural beauty of the area can enhance. All, I find, is much better still when shared with someone you Love. Pure Joy in that instant in time.

This measure of peace and joy and happiness can be found in other things, in other times, other places. A newborn child, friendship, in achieving something new. But in this sunset I find a sense for what that feeling truly is, ‘pure joy’. Awe and amazement and a feeling of being truly happy.

I wonder, where is that point of true happiness for you?

0208410001537188639.jpg0613385001537188993.jpg

Posted:  1 week, 1 day ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

Perhaps a start with the other side of ‘life on the road’. The travel and ‘sleep in your vehicle’ I have experience doing.

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Posted:  1 week, 1 day ago

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My / Our(?) - Photos ...

It has been said a picture is worth a thousand words ...

I was taking a look at my profile and I realized the few photos included in my list are those I have posted in response to threads I’ve seen. Information unrelated to me. I thought to upload, and believe I can only do this trough a post, a few photos that tell a little more about me.

I’ve created this thread for that reason.

Others would be welcome to, are invited to, share photos to this thread as well.

Posted:  1 week, 3 days ago

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N00b Questions You (Probably) Have But Were Afraid To Ask!

Regarding this post, now long ago ... PlanB ...

Braking

I wanted to point out that the breaking technique used by PlanB, apparently in complete conflict with his training, is exactly what the CDL manual (today) says should be done.

This is the way we are being taught in driver training.

High Road Training, page 47

Proper Braking Technique
Remember, the use of brakes on a long and/or steep downgrade is only a supplement to the braking effect of the engine. Once the vehicle is in the proper low gear, the following is the proper braking technique:

- Apply the brakes just hard enough to feel a definite slowdown.

- When your speed has been reduced to approximately 5 mph below your “safe” speed, release the brakes.
(This brake application should last about 3 seconds.)

- When your speed has increased to your “safe” speed, repeat the first two steps.

For example, if your “safe” speed is 40 mph, you would not apply the brakes until your speed reaches 40 mph. You now apply the brakes hard enough to gradually reduce your speed to 35 mph and then release the brakes. Repeat this as often as necessary until you have reached the end of the downgrade.

This Proper Braking technique is the correct approach to use for down hill. Jake braking should be used, but only when road conditions are good.

PlanB chose a safe driving speed, 15 mph. He applied brake pressure until slowing 5 mph below the safe speed, then released and repeated the process when the safe speed was again reached. This technique helps to prevent overheating.

It is also interesting that this Proper Breaking technique might now be well understood by the science community but less understood by drivers (?), or perhaps by some older drivers?
I know that the technique used for downhill breaking was taught differently in the past, and that some teachers and old videos incorrectly taught that riding the brakes all the way down the hill was best.

During my recent CDL training one OLD video stated that lightly holding the brakes ALL the way down the mountain was the BEST way to break inorder to prevent overheating. As is now understood, riding the breaks will cause overheating and possibly fire, even in freezing conditions.

I'd like to ask for any advice or tips on a situation that almost turned catastrophic on me a few weeks ago.

I am a new driver in Primes team driving (TnT) phase of training. I was traveling West bound on I-80 West of Cheyenne WY. Road conditions quickly deteriorated after I passed Cheyenne. High winds started blowing snow across the road. Temperature was below freezing and black ice warnings started flashing on highway signs. ...

- PlanB

It might also be noted that current training says that in the event the drive wheels lock up and slide, we should release the brakes and coast, steering as appropriate. Training indicates we should not tap/punch the accelerator to get the drive tires rolling.

I will admit the tap is intuitive, for me, however experience doing this in a Toyota 4Runner, Colorado high-country, once put me in the ditch. Experience in very different vehicle, I know, but enough for me.

In slowing in a coast, the breaks should release and the tires should roll without help. The tap can add forward motion and compound the skid.

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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Million pound load

An interesting story...

First I wondered, “What is it?

0530054001536931105.jpg0984565001536931142.jpg0425891001536931183.jpg

Then I wondered why they could not ship the components separately and complete construction on-site.

I suspect the “transformer” they are shipping will serve a field of windmills rather than just one, but in that windy part of the country, it could be just one Very Large Windmill. 🙂

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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Question about High Road Training

Thank you Brett!

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

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Question about High Road Training

I have a sense that the score for a given page will change over time as you repeat that page, perhaps also changing over time as questions for the page are used as review questions for other pages.

I have repeated page 103 - 3 times and found the dashboard reporting 70%, 77% and now 81%.

It appears you can improve your scores without a complete reset.

I have not yet attempted a reset, as I am concerned it would reset scores for all pages. I am hoping to complete the test once before a reset and restart.

Question?
Is it possible to reset individual pages (only) or reset individual sections (Log Book only) of the test? Or does the reset only perform a complete test reset?

Thanks!

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