Profile For Todd Holmes

Todd Holmes's Info

  • Location:
    Boise, ID

  • Driving Status:
    Considering A Career

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    9 months, 2 weeks ago

Todd Holmes's Bio

American man. Age 54. Don't smoke, drink or do drugs. No felony. No DUI/DWI lifetime. Army Vet. Light-wheeled vehicle mechanic, 63B10. 1988-1995. Honorable discharge. Gun Owners of America life member. 2nd Amendment advocate.

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Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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Many drivers like to use an old-fashioned road atlas.....and the telephone....but...

As a few others have mentioned, every single thing you've brought up and over analyzed has been talked about before in numerous threads which can quickly be found in the search bar. I've said it a couple times already that I'm a firm believer that you're really not interested in trucking, you're a troll who lives for the sound of your own voice.

If that is the case, what can be found in the search bar, then why does Brett even allow new posts on things supposedly covered before to begin with?

Stop being so antisocial, people, please! Many people are under the impression that drivers (and railroad men) are antisocial cliques.

Being a firm believer that "I am not interested in this craft". I would not stake my soul on it.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

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Brett, what I do need to know is how to properly communicate with people in this business without hurting anybody's feelings or giving a bad impression of myself to others.

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Seriously Todd, you've done nothing but self impose a bad impression of yourself on here, I really think you should just have the decency to quietly fade away from this site and leave it to those who are seriously trying to get their trucking career going, and those who are here to help! PLEASE, ENOUGH ALREADY!

I'm on the last chapter of Brett's Raw Truth. In Conclusion.

In his last chapter, he was talking about the wonders of GPS in his Technology and Entertainment section. Yes, Brett, I love GPS too but so many technophobe drivers here seem to love and trust their Rand McNally. I have had a Garmin in my car since 2011. I have never had a road map in my car since I got my Garmin new. Before I got a GPS, I would use Google Maps or Mapquest and print out driving directions at home to go some place I didn't know. It was awkward to try to drive and read this thing behind the wheel. Hearing the voice turn-by-turn directions keeps my eye on the road and I can quickly glance at the screen to see the route highlighted in pink.

MY GPS only got me on a wild goose chase once on a northern California county road way up in Del Norte County high inthe mountains. I've heard these things are more goof-prone in rural areas than in big cities. Neither the GPS nor any visible road signage warned me of a dead end in the road due to fallen debris from a hillside about one hour into this road where I had turned off from a highway. My Garmin was set in the "save fuel" mode. In a semi, there would have been no way in the devil to make a U turn on that narrow road where it was impassable to a pile of fallen hillside and rock that blocked it. I called the Del Norte County Sheriff when I got back in the Crescent City to complain about this road and its lack of warning signage. This particular county doesn't seem to inspect and maintain its roads often. This was in the summer of 2011 and I was returning from a camping trip at Panther Flat in this county back to Sacramento via Mount Shasta where I would spend one more night at a campground there. I wanted to take a more scenic rural route back than I101 coastal via Eureka I came up. The road should have been closed and had signage posted at the intersection where it began. The road did even have gates that were open at its entrance. I've found my Garmin unit is more reliable if you set in the "save time" mode rather than "save gas" mode. It's a Nuvi 1350 series. Even a Rand McNally atlas wouldn't ever know a two-lane county road would be blocked due to an unforeseen landslide ahead plus no warning signs posted anywhere so I can't fault GPS entirely.

Tomorrow, I will start reading High Road Training and try to resist any temptation to post anything unless it is a direct question for clarifications as to what I read in that material and maybe I can earn my welcome back here. Yes, I'm free of smoking cigarettes for many years and drinking for several years but have to break that addiction to posting things on impulse. I do get lonely.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

A final reply from Ms. Jones at Wilson Logistics to me:

(I'm glad she is speaking positive things to me and shows no ill-will toward me. It helps me feel better!)

"Good Afternoon, "Todd".

No offense taken. Please do keep Wilson Logistics in mind once you have achieved your desired health status.

Take care and best of luck to you!"

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Todd, I wish you well and truly hope you some day find the psychological help you so obviously need.

i say that with the deepest sincerity. Mental illness is tragic, and those who suffer often do not know why. They often self medicate and although i'm glad you are not doing that, it seems you are attempting it in other ways.

Please seek help.

Now, Rainy D., do you have any work experience in any of the healthcare fields? If not, please try not to diagnose me on these boards.

But maybe you are correct after all. It sounds like a good idea. Really. I could really ask my primary VA doctor to consult me with a VA behavioral specialist to see if my obesity and chronic fatigue might be connected to some yet-to-be-diagnosed mental health issue. It is as important to have a healthy mind as it is to have a healthy body. It would not hurt me to ask and check it out. One of the things I often suffer is a morbid fear of death and dying from some undiagnosed illness and this seems to come on during episodes when my fatigue and/or body pain is severe. Many of my family members have died of heart disease or cancer. The fatigue often makes me feel depressed. Or is it the depression causing the fatigue? One of my roomates (he moved out early last June) thought I had OCD and/or hypochondria.

Please everybody don't insinuate that I am a crazy person by what I type on these boards.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Todd, this says it all...

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I know some people here think I'm a lazy bum but I can't help that. You've never been inside my body to feel how badly it is suffering and even my "doctor" (a VA government pill-pushing idiot who likely failed to make it in private practice where there's much better money in medicine) thinks CFS is a joke.

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OMG...we can now add VA Dictirs to your growing list of undignified vocations. You are such a jackass.

Todd if the above description of your condition is entirely accurate, how then can you even consider driving an 80,000lb CMV? I’ll give you the answer, YOU CAN’T.

Like they say on Shark Tank, I’m out.

Good luck Todd. Get your sh** together.

Peace.

I'm a man of HOPE. I want to actually be HEALTHY enough to WORK FOR LIVING, period.

I want to actually be healthy enough to scrub toilets and pack industrial vacuum cleaners on my back full time. If that is my hard, long narrow winding uphill rocky road (my ticket) to becoming an OTR driver with a handsome paycheck, I am NOW willing to do that. So be it.

I actually envy the HEALTH and stamina of those people who are shoveling horse manure at minimum wage (or below) full time in 100-plus degree heat. I wish I had the physical strength to do even that.

Believe me, I want to be as strong as Superman. I want to again be like that tough soldier I was when I was younger.

People might wish me well on my physical rehabilitation attempts. All I can do is try.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

You know how you get an answer? You apply for the job and on the application YOU BE TRUTHFUL. Nobody is going to spend the money on sending you to orientation just to send you home. The people who get sent home most likely lied on application, failed physical or failed a drug test. These companies extend an offer to come in to orientation based on the information you put in the application and they will verify that when you're there. If JP, Wil-trans, or Prime is your first choice just know they're more selective than other carriers.

Again, fill out the dang application and you'll know where you stand and what you need to do to be hireable for them in the future.

Well, I just did get an email reply from one Ms. Jones from Wilson Logistics as follows:

"Good Morning, (my legal first name). Need to provide a correction; it is Ms., not Mr. I received your email yesterday via our general mailbox. Yes, Jim Palmer and Wilson Logistics are the same company, just a different division. As for our hiring policy, we take all applications on a case by case basis. If at any point we need documentation to verify any history, we will request it at that time. I’ve attempted to reach out to you a few times; if you can give me a call at 406-829-6286 to discuss any further questions you may have, I’d greatly appreciate it!"

This pretty much answers my most nagging question about hiring policy and work history gaps. It's kind of a roll-of-the-dice thing. An "ify" situation. It's not a definite "Go hold down a toilet-scrubbing job for a year or two and then get back to us!" kind of thing.

So, I politely replied to this lady as follows as honestly as I could:

"Jan. 3, 2019

Good afternoon, Ms. Jones:

Thank you for your reply.

I do apologize for the masculine assumption in using "sir" as I am not familiar with the given name "Japera". I was taught in the 4th grade (by a lady teacher, I might add) to address a formal business letter as "Dear Sirs" whether a woman or a man actually reads it. So, please take no offense. Nothing personal. Just a habit.

I'm now in a serious and committed weight-loss and exercise regimen to achieve a healthy body weight and body fat percentage with a diet and exercise program as provided through my healthcare provider, the VA.

I hope to recover from my obesity and its symptoms very soon and I'm so very eager to become a productive member of the American workforce once again. On a positive note regarding my health, thankfully, I have not smoked for 14 years, touched alcohol for several years (except red wine for cooking) and have a long-standing clean DMV record.

Thank you once again for your reply on hiring policy regarding work history. I was deeply concerned that might be a serious issue regarding coming into a new career as an OTR driver.

I will save your email messages in my Employment folder for now and bear Wilson Logistics and Jim Palmer in mind when hopefully in the near future my doctor will clear me to return to work full time once again. My doctor assures me that averting my obesity is the key to ending my disabling condition.

Sincerely, (my legal name) Future OTR Driver Hopeful"

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

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Based off your post history I highly doubt any company would cold email you trying to recruit you. Your history here indicates a student would be nothing but trouble from before even making it to their school.

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Bob, you don't know me to judge me fairly, sir. If you got to know me you might not think me a bad person.

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Kinda like how you have pre-judged janitors, buereaucrats and minimum wage workers?

Waffled when asked direct questions?

And taking us down the Rabbit Hole more than once only to surface with confirmation that you “knew it” all along.

Get real Todd (for just once). If you don’t want to be perceived as a pain-in-the-ass, stop conducting yourself like one.

And for the record, I think you would be very difficult as a student because based on every one of your posts, you lack a basic, but necessary set of personality traits to be successful:

Ability to follow instructions

Strong work ethic

Single-minded focus

Humility/Coachability

Positive attitude

And that’s just a few...

You have repeatedly and chronically demonstrated the opposite in your interaction on this forum. Conduct yourself in school, during orientation...and if by some stroke of luck “road training”, your failure is imminent.

G-Town, I was a straight-A student through college. Yes, I've only achieved a humble associates degree, computer information science, though. I now think pursuing a higher degree or a ton of certifications at my age, 55 this April, a waste of time. The IT industry is full of young people anyway. They don't want to hire some gray old fart like me. That computer geek technology stuff is too brain-racking at my age anyway and now I find computers boring to death.

Please cite a sample where I may have failed to follow instructions?

I know some people here think I'm a lazy bum but I can't help that. You've never been inside my body to feel how badly it is suffering and even my "doctor" (a VA government pill-pushing idiot who likely failed to make it in private practice where there's much better money in medicine) thinks CFS is a joke. People will believe what they want to believe. I only have to somehow convince any future employer (if there ever is one, I might get killed by a meteor tomorrow morning) of that I am otherwise not a lazy bum.

Now, I have to go do some more rehabilitative exercise.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

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If I were a hiring personnel for a trucking company.......

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If I were the owner of a company

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Todd, you don't even have a job and you haven't had a job in almost 15 years. You've also never been in charge of hiring or owned a company. So why are you expecting people who actually hold these positions to do things the way you expect them to be done? The truth is you have no Earthly idea how these jobs are done so you shouldn't even have an opinion on it.

What you should do for starters is stop judging everyone. You should have one thought on your mind - what do I need to know and what do I need to do to land a job in this industry? That's it. Your opinions and expectations are based on absolutely no experience or expertise, so why do you think they are so valuable?

Brett, what I do need to know is how to properly communicate with people in this business without hurting anybody's feelings or giving a bad impression of myself to others.

Ok, I have made diplomacy mistakes here but I don't want these to carry over to a job interview.

How should one approach prospective trucking companies/recruiters with questions or concerns whether by US mail, email, text or telephone?

I think asking about hiring policy is not trivial at all. Other people posting on this site have indicated to me that an employment gap could be a serious issue or barrier. The hirers either will hold my employment gap against me or they won't, all other things the same. I'm certainly not a convicted felon. Regardless of the length of my employment gap, I do have US Department of VA documentation to cover each and every minute of it and my VA doctor would gladly sign a release back to work if he felt that I really was able to go back to work and that's going to be mostly based upon what I tell him as to how I feel. I know my own body. I know whether it has the stamina to take on any job full time including being a Walmart door greeter full time. Those poor people have to stand all shift long on their feet and drivers are seated most of the time while on duty. If I can sleep a solid eight hours and stay up without taking a nap or lying down on my bed once at any time for the other sixteen hours, and do this consistently for at least a month, I will feel 100% ready to get back to work.

Why can't I get one simple answer for one simple question from a company?

Well, I'll wait and see if Mr. Jones responds to my message.

Yes or no.

PS - Brett, if you do believe I have a 15 year employment gap even with documented disability for that whole duration, should I just forever forget truck driving based solely on that fact alone?

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

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Bob, you don't know me to judge me fairly, sir. If you got to know me you might not think me a bad person.

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Todd, unfortunately we know you very well. You have revealed yourself repeatedly. Nobody's judging you by anything other than the evidence you're giving.

Also, it doesn't matter if you send a trucking company an email, a phone call, or a pony Express overnight delivery. If you ask them about hiring requirements your inquiry is going straight to a recruiter. What were you expecting? They don't employ some sweet little old lady to answer every bozo's question that happens to come to them - that is the work for the recruiters. They don't deal with the general public through some customer service department.

Well, I might not be the most competent Trucking Truth poster in the world, Old School, but I am not a bad person. I never once claimed to be perfect. If this man is a recruiter for a company, I want a straight honest answer about hiring somebody whose has just been on disability for several years and not dance around the issue like a car salesman. He gave me all that other fluff but never once answered my simple question. If this man were more professional, he would have stated in his message to me that he was responding to me on behalf of the inquiry I have made using Jim Palmer contact information that I retrieved from Jim Pamer's own site.

If I were a hiring personnel for a trucking company, I would want an application submitted and preapproved for CDL training before a ticket for the Dog is even issued to a potential recruit. If I were the owner of a company, I wouldn't even want to pay for a bus ticket unless I had determined the candidate met all my hiring criteria (eg. no convictions for violent or drug-related crimes, not a registered sex offender, no DUI, no license suspension etc.) in the first place.

If there were an alleged disability-related employment gap, I would at least want verification of recent disability history and something in writing from a doctor saying something to the effect of "cleared to return to work". I'm not going to require off the bat that somebody get off even verifiable disability, go hold a Walmart greeting sign, push a broom, scrub toilets, pour Starbucks coffee, shine shoes, drive taxis, mow lawns or flip burgers for a year or more then come back and see me about a possible driving career.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Based off your post history I highly doubt any company would cold email you trying to recruit you. Your history here indicates a student would be nothing but trouble from before even making it to their school.

In case some people here are interested, I just now replied to this alleged "solicited" email with the following:

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"January 3, 2018

Mr. Jones:

Thank you for emailing me about truck driving recruitment. To be honest, sir, I'm not now ready to return to work due to disability for which I am now in the recovery process.

How did you come by my email contact information, sir?

I did email a message to Jim Palmer Trucking with contact information its website provided with a question just the other day. Are you affiliated with that company?

My question was in regard to that company's hiring policy since I honestly have no verifiable work history over the past several years but I can provide disability documentation should I apply for employment in the future to explain such a work history gap.

Is having a gap in work history even for a verifiable disability history still an automatic disqualifier for being hired at Jim Palmer or any other company you are affiliated with, sir? I've heard a rumor that Swift and others in the freight trucking business might pass people over based on such disability-related-work-history-gap reasons but I don't know that for a fact.

Sincerely.

(my legal name)

Boise, ID Resident and Future OTR Driver Hopeful"

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Perhaps, people here can kindly give me advice on how to properly communicate with prospective trucking employers so I don't say or type the wrong thing and bungle it badly for myself. Yes, communication/people/soft skills is where I feel I am still tender, I do admit.

At least I was polite to the strange man in my email by addressing him Sir.

I'm actually interested in what he might have to say to me. It is unreasonable to even ask a prospective employer about its "hiring policy" in detail? Is that none of my business?

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Based off your post history I highly doubt any company would cold email you trying to recruit you. Your history here indicates a student would be nothing but trouble from before even making it to their school.

Bob, you don't know me to judge me fairly, sir. If you got to know me you might not think me a bad person.

Posted:  6 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

Based off your post history I highly doubt any company would cold email you trying to recruit you. Your history here indicates a student would be nothing but trouble from before even making it to their school.

"Todd Holmes", by the way, is NOT my real legal name. I would never use my real legal name on discussion sites as these. I don't know any person here personally. The email address I used to inquire using contact info from the JP site certainly does not reflect "Todd Holmes". I did not ask to be recruited anyway. I asked one question pertaining to its hiring policy. "Is a recent verifiable work history an absolute must?" Why would they waste my time and their money to put me all the way on the Dog from Idaho to Washington State and in a hotel room and back home again just to tell me "Sorry. We can't hire you. You have no verifiable work history." I don't even feel medically ready to return to work...... yet.

I want to see what their hiring policy in regards to my question in writing from them so that way I have a hard copy for future reference. Should I get on the telephone to them and ask them bluntly?

You don't really believe I received an email as I have posted above? You think I typed all that stuff as "troll material"? I just wanted to know what people thought of that email and not what you thought of me.

I will put that email in my folder called Employment stuff. I will honestly tell Mr. Jones by a reply that I am still recovering from disability and I'm not yet ready to return to work yet. And by the way sir, how did you get my email address?

If he references JP Trucking, I will tell him I only wanted an answer to the question about that firm's "verifiable work history" hiring policy. Unless they can put it in writing to me that a lack of verifiable work history is an absolute disqualifier, I'm not getting on any Greyhound.

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

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Many drivers like to use an old-fashioned road atlas.....and the telephone....but...

My tools. This is one of the most important tools. Get a new one every year. 0842979001546459162.jpg Garmin dezl 580 and my PeopleNet. 0547164001546459298.jpg Rand McNally Tnd 540 0673801001546459406.jpg When my student gets off my truck, I will mount the Rand McNally under the Garmin.

I also use many apps on my phone including DOT apps for road conditions.

I go by the thought of "Use the best tools you can."

It's sounds like the prudent driver had better have a number of tools in his navigation tool box and know how to use each and every one of them like a master of his trade.

Every good driver should also have a paper notepad and have at least two ink pens: the pen is mightier than the diesel engine!

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

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What constitutes a 'lousy load' in freight hauling?

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Variables are limitless and can change without notice...very difficult to manage with a set plan.

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This is Trucking 100% in a nutshell. This is definitely one of the most unpredictable industries you could ever get into. We never know what is goin to happen from one day to the next.

Now that I have thought about it, that is LIFE in general also.

Maybe the surprises, perhaps curve balls, trucking throws at you may even be fun or exciting. Driving a rig can be something of a freight mystery tour.

Pushing stacks of paper at a desk sounds boring as hell. Sorry, I just dumped on somebody's occupation as a bureaucrat.

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

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What constitutes a 'lousy load' in freight hauling?

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Variables are limitless and can change without notice...very difficult to manage with a set plan.

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This is Trucking 100% in a nutshell. This is definitely one of the most unpredictable industries you could ever get into. We never know what is goin to happen from one day to the next.

Now that I have thought about it, that is LIFE in general also.

In short the only thing CONSISTENT about trucking is change everyday and surprises around every corner: and the only two certain things in life are taxes and death. Sounds much like the military I served for seven years.

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

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I've just received an unsolicited email message from a CDL recruiter.

I don't know this person. Do you?

Somebody by the handle of "Japera Jones" at some outfit in Washington State called Wilson Logistics.com. It's a coincidence that I have posting here about truck driving lately and I get a message by email from a complete stranger about trucking recruiting. I did inquire to Jim Palmer trucking by email a couple of days ago with a question regarding hiring policy. Is Palmer affiliated with this strange recruiter?

Here's his pitch whoever he is (should I send this email to my Spam folder?):

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"Hey Todd,

Below, I have included information regarding how our training program works, as well as our many driving opportunities. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me at 406-829-6286 or my cell at 206-553-9277. I have included a link to the full application at the bottom of this email. Hope to see your application soon!

We would pay for the bus ticket or if you preferred to fly or drive, we would reimburse up to the amount of the cost of the bus ticket. We have the $150 ADMIN FEE which has to be paid upfront once you are approved and arrived at our terminal. We would provide you with a hotel stay, which has complimentary breakfast; we would cover lunches. You will then get your CDL permit and then we would send you out OTR for 3 weeks of permit driving during which time we would offer a $200/ week advance. We would then have you take the CDL test and once they obtained their CDL license, we would send them back out OTR for 40k miles of team driving. You will be paid 12 cpm or $600/ week whichever greater for the first 10k miles and then 14 cpm or $700/ week whichever greater for the remaining 30k miles. We would then get you out in your own truck solo as a company driver under a ONE YEAR CONTRACT. You would then make 40 cpm with the ability to earn up to 5 extra cpm with a fuel incentive for the OTR company position or 45 cents/ mile with the western regional position.

https://www.wilsonlogistics.com/apply/japeraj

We offer several different positions to suit your needs and wants:

OTR Company Positions West Coast to Midwest lanes (NO North East) East Coast to Midwest lanes Competitive pay (averaging .42-.43 cpm) $10,000 longevity bonus after 5 years OTR and Regional Lease Positions 70% of the line haul, 100% of the fuel surcharge No money down, no credit check No penalty walkaway $10,000 longevity bonus after 5 years West Coast Regional Positions .45 cpm Guaranteed home 3 times per month Potential for pass throughs $10,000 longevity bonus after 5 years CDL Training On the job training, hands on, one-on-one FREE with 1 year contract $10,000 longevity bonus after 5 years

What sets us apart from the competition?

Completely updated and maintained equipment with upgrades including but not limited to APU’s, Inverters, EpicVue with flat screen TV’s, Navigation, and more. Small onboarding classes (1-5 drivers a week) with only the most qualified drivers. Fleet managers that focus on communication for optimal driver success."

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Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

What constitutes a 'lousy load' in freight hauling?

How many of you are old enough to remember the TV show Fantasy Island? "Tatoo?" "Boss, de plane".

Todd...your reality is definitely to the far right of normal, common sense expectations. We are at the very beginning or end of the supply chain, completely exposed by every F/U and/or change that occurred up-stream hours, days or at times weeks prior. I highly suggest finding a book on basic logistics, because many of your questions center around "movin'-sh**-101", and have no direct bearing on performing this job with reasonable efficiency. Seriously Man...how on earth can you expect something with almost an infinite number of variables have anything beyond basic standards? And please...keep the f'ing government out of it. Everything they touch ends up worse and more expensive.

There's my daily "Todd" rant...

Okay, real quick...Todd this is for you, and highly summarized...

A typical Walmart dry grocery load is loaded with anywhere from 1-4 store stops (40-44k lbs, 26-30 pallets), usually (hopefully) in sequential order. It's only the last stop that can be drop & hook, and only if an empty is available and the store is a drop & hook location (due to size, or lack there-of). Anything before the last stop is a live unload that I am required to oversee, and at times supervise. Dry vendor backhauls are usually, but not always drop & hook.

A typical FDD (Freezer-Deli-Dairy) consolidated Walmart perishable reefer load is 3-5 (35-39k lbs, 24-26 pallets) stops, interspersed between 3 different temperature zones. It's possible to have a pallets for a single store located in 3 different zones, requiring other store pallets come-off first in order to get to the specific pallet for that current store delivery, and then everything put back that is not assigned to that particular store (like Rainy said, it can be complex). Confused yet? Imagine new drivers dealing with this? It's why we usually train new drivers for up to 3 days. That said, Walmart Reefer store stops are always live unload, and absolutely must be supervised by the driver. If a miss-delivery occurs, the driver is responsible for back-tracking and "righting" the mistake. Very costly in time when this happens (and it does). Perishable vendor backhauls are sometimes drop & hook, sometimes live load. And sometimes a combination that occurs at Joanna Farms between their different plants on the same property. It's not unusual to p/u a reefer loaded halfway with frozen yogurt that requires docking for a live load of milk (different temp zones).

Backhauls vary from vendor to vendor and also dependent on how busy the vendor is, seasonal. Turkey or Potato farms in October, crazy busy, trailers parked in the adjoining street. Or Nestle' Waters during the summer is very busy, often times requiring a live-load occur or a swap for a pre-loaded trailer assigned to another Walmart route (please don't ask).

So Todd, that's what you can expect for just one Dedicated Retail Grocery Account. Variables are limitless and can change without notice...very difficult to manage with a set plan.

Ok, G-Town, we all can for WISH for one thing but getting is another ball of wax. Should I become an industrial engineer and try to figure out how to make freight trucking more efficient? No, just kidding, my college days are over. But Brett did leave me with the impression in his book, Raw Truth, that some companies and customers by the nature of the goods involved have more regularity (if that word even exist in truckerspeak vocabulary) in their respective operations than others. Not all companies are "the same". Brett also says the more trucks roll, the more money flows. Now, I don't know anything about temperature zones or backhauls. I never drove for Walmart but I can see the potential for truck driver impatience and short tempers. In my other occupations, I have dealt with drivers face to face. In the army, early 1990's, a civilian contractor carrier driver criticized me in the motor pool for being too slow or incompetent with a Hyster 4,000 pound forklift. He was trying to tell me how to operate a forklift. There were pallets of supplies I had volunteered to help load from the ground level to the back of the dry van. I had prior experience with a forklift at another job but was a bit rusty in my forklift skills. In 1985, I had a job at Burger King: the kind of job I now put down. I had to stock the store early in the morning with a hand truck when the "Distron" rig (a BK corporate Great Dane reefer) came. The driver would stack these on my dolly in something he called a "ten-stack" such as cartons of frozen burger patties. I would help stack things on the dolly sometimes. One time I did not do it his way but in some other way I thought would make the job faster. I ended up spilling the cartoons all over the ground and I caught the Dutch Uncle from him and then finally his method made sense after all. Yes, sir, some drivers have a God complex. They will buffalo around shippers and receivers. I have been on both the shipper and receiver end of a semi with arrogant drivers at each end.

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

What constitutes a 'lousy load' in freight hauling?

Drop and hook is not always possible. Some companies do not have the room to store the trailers and some receivers are so small they get only a few pallets at a time. Meat plants want the meat to be as fresh as possbile so some do not slaughter the animals until you check in. Meats are almost always a drop and hook but that doesnt mean they are loaded for you already. Often you drop your empty and wait for your load to be ready in another trailer. Some shippers may fill trailers so quickly they never have enough to make all loads drop and hook. Another problem is drivers only want to pick up good trailers so they leave empty ones that need repair and never fix them. Then the company needs to make special arrangements for repairs.

Beer is another that is drop and hook on pick up at major breweries but can have multiple stops at small places with little room. And i get drop pay too but it isnt as much as i could drive in that time, so i would rather be driving.

When dealing with food time is of the essence. Some customers only unload meats at midnight, frozen at 0700 and perishables at noon for example. Meat and produce are almost never drop and hook at receivers because the product is destroyed if the receiver "loses" the trailer on their yard. That only takes one person entering the wrong trailer into the computer. Been there done that. I went to Walmart and security refusee to let me in cause the computer said the trailer was currently on the lot. Turned into a big hassle.

Trucking is much more complex than most people think. There is no way I could say I do mostly drop and hook. I have kept the same trailer for up to 2 weeks. Maybe 50/50, i dont know. i never really kept track, but even if it is a drop on one end, a drop on both ends is more rare. However, to run a dry load which would be a drop at both ends I simply turn off the reefer.

I would think loads such as live animals are always live loads such as loading cattle from the feedlot enroute to the slaughterhouse. Any cattle hauling experience here?

Yes, drop n hook probably doesn't usually work for perishable goods, maybe not?

Things that have long shelf lives as oil drums on pallets, cement and lumber are probably loads that are conducive to drop n hook by nature, maybe?

Brett says in Raw Truth that some companies only deal with certain kinds of cargo and on a regular basis with the same customers over the same routes and perhaps this puts some degree of predictability in a driver's life.

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Many drivers like to use an old-fashioned road atlas.....and the telephone....but...

What about GPS technology as from Garmin and others? What do you think about this stuff?

Garmin, for instance has a GPS navigator and more:

dēzlCam™ 785 LMT-S 7" GPS Truck Navigator with Built-in Dash Cam PART NUMBER: 010-01856-00

an optional dash cam and even a backup cam. It claims it can alert you for traffic, weather, curves and steep grades.

It claims it's Custom Truck Routing feature can:

"Along with its camera-enabled features, the dēzlCam 785 LMT-S truck navigator also includes preloaded maps that detail truck-related route warnings — such as bridge heights, sharp curves, steep grades and more — for most major roads and highways. Simply enter your vehicle profile information (customizable by height, weight, length, width and hazardous materials*) to find truck-preferred routes suitable for the size and weight of your truck².

*(Yes, it supposedly can find you a legal HAZMAT route (in most areas) without having to go through the hassle and time of calling all the various state DOT offices as Brett had mentioned toward the end of his Raw Truth book. If a HAZMAT truck driver gets in trouble for driving a route Garmin prescribed, can he turn around and sue Garmin? Brett told me in his book of his nightmare driving in New York City the first time in his career. Could Garmin back then have made Brett's life much easier? )

Customized Truck Routing For added convenience, the Simple Truck Profile lets you easily swap trailer sizes with the touch of a button."

Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

What constitutes a 'lousy load' in freight hauling?

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I think most drivers would favor drop and hook over live loads.

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Of course they would. Unfortunately there's times and reasons why we can't always have our preferences. Maybe that will help you understand the reference to a load as "lousy."

Flatbed drivers seldom see drop and hooks, much like tanker yankers. Trucking is as varied as it's many customers are.

I would think certain kinds of companies and customers do drop and hook on a regular basis.

Probably couriers as UPS and FedEx maybe?

The idea of intermodal freight transport sounds super high speed.

I always thought railroad piggy-back service was cool too.

Plop on containers, pull off containers, plop on containers and roll!

Yes, my endeavor might be to someday work for the most "streamlined" company I can find. Yes, my first company might not be so slick, smart and clever as I dream. I would think the best companies in this business are the ones who hire the most ex-drivers in all the various administrative positions. I think managers, dispatchers, load planners, executives and presidents who are seasoned drivers themselves understand the business and "see things" from the "driver's point of view" and can best empathize with the drivers and knows what best benefits them. I'm almost done with Brett's Raw Truth and his book seems to make this obvious to me.

The one with the most roll time and the least wait time.

"Streamlined" (smart, efficient, high speed/low drag) companies have all their stuff wired tight and all bases covered at all times: customer accounts, truck stop accounts, repair shop accounts, regular routes well planned and established down to a fine science. More consistent schedules. This idea of a driver's having to telephone a customer and ask for driving directions to avoid possible low bridges seems shoddy to me as a way of operating.

Such companies also probably deal with the same customers on a consistent basis and the operation whole SOP becomes etched in stone.

Yes, Old School, please go ahead and tell me that is wishful thinking on my part and it probably is.

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