Profile For Donald B.

Donald B.'s Info

  • Location:
    Moore, OK

  • Driving Status:
    Preparing For School

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    7 months, 1 week ago

Donald B.'s Bio

i love the default avatar i was provided of the custom-painted Pete...no need to upload a new one...

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Posted:  7 months ago

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New cdl driver with fresh felony conviction

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Donald B. You will have a much happier life when you stop blaming your self created problems on other people. You went into Walmart to rob them. They thought you looked suspicious. Had nothing to do with the state they were located in. Every state has their own laws for driver's license. You must follow the rules. In your two posts in this thread you helped no one, just whined about how the world has done you wrong.

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^^^^ this...

I usually don't pile on to these.

But really - "conservative state" (you will find most truckers tend towards conservative), "anal redneck bumpins" (you mean they FOLLOW THE LAWS?).

While you make the appearance of "owning up to your mistakes" (I did get caught) - you somehow think the only thing WRONG with what you did - was GETTING CAUGHT.

Sounds like you are going to do REALLY WELL with all the RULES you have to abide by in this industry. The first thing you are going to need to do, it CLEAN UP YOUR ATTITUDE and your perception of the world around you.

Rick

My beef is not with the DMV workers who "follow the laws" but with elected officials, politicians, people us Americans vote for, who legislate such nonsense on the books. My current driver's license is from another "red" state that has my non-birth-certificate alias printed upon it. I was in fact able to get a driver's license in Idaho, for all its conservative ways, with the assumed alias I posted about earlier. All I had attached to my birth certificate was a notarized sworn statement, a Declaration, saying that the alias I was assuming and the person on my birth certificate with a different middle name was the same person, myself. The conservative redneck state of Idaho even accepted this document and the state of California, a police state, also accepted the same document and I was issued a DL there also with no court-ordered name-change requirements. Oklahoma will not accept the same Declaration attached to my birth certificate as other states have. They have to be different. They demand a court-ordered name-change. I will then have to pay $30 to my native state of Arizona to have my name amended on the BC itself. My beef is having to shell out money for the cost of legal procedures that Okie-homie demands that was never even an issue for nearly 40 years of my life. I started using a different middle name back in 1982. I served in the military under that alias. The VA knows me under that alias. My misdemeanor record is under that alias. The social security administration knows me under that alias. The IRS knows me under that alias. In America we have to follow certain rules but the First Amendment guarantees us the right to say something about it. If you don't like the current law you can vote or petition for changes.

The petty theft (not robbery, which involves arms or threats) conviction happened in Idaho in 2017 and the judge there granted me a "withheld judgement" a year later for good behavior and my lawyer had told me that employers therefore won't be able to see this through background checks. The telephone threats conviction, plead deal, had not stopped my getting employment with several companies including a large tire store since it happened in 1999.

Do trucking companies even ask about misdemeanors on applications?

Posted:  7 months ago

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New cdl driver with fresh felony conviction

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Ive been out of prison for 10months obtained my class b cdl 8/6/19 And getting doors shut in my face.wht road should i take

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I have a couple non-violent/non-sexual/non-drug/non-vehicle-related misdemeanors on my record but I'm now in the legal process of getting my name changed by a local law firm. Here in Oklahoma the courts don't even run background checks for name-change petitions or ask about criminal history. Just can't be a registered sex offender in Sooner State for name change. I'm certainly not one of those creeps. Basically years ago I entered a plea deal for making verbal threats over the telephone to two bureaucratic college professors and leaving them on their answering machines like an idiot. The police claimed they had voice-print ID technology because I had disguised my voice . The other was for trying to shoplift Walmart for $97 in groceries. Covering the meat up with reusable blue Walmart shopping bags in the shopping wagon and saying "I forgot to pay" didn't cut it in one red state I was in. My lawyer said that case would have likely ended up as a conviction had it gone to a jury trial. In California maybe, but in any red state not. It's tough to plants the seeds of doubt in the minds of jurors in conservative states. They'll darn near hang you for spitting on the sidewalk. The loss-prevention women claimed she saw me cover the stuff on camera and then started to follow me around the store. I suspect that they stated to follow me as soon as I came in the store with a bunch of empty blue bags. This red state, being a red state, is not very environmentally conscientious and I'm perhaps the only person they ever saw using reusable shopping bags. Yes, I'm guilty on all counts. I was caught after all.

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Why the name change?

Just the middle name is to be changed. It's actually going to amend my birth certificate name. Since age 18 I've assumed a different middle name (Howard) than what is printed on my original birth certificate: the name of Mortimer. I hated the sound of "Mortimer", my BC middle name. The state of Oklahoma requires one's name to match their BC name in order to get a driver license. These old redneck bumpkins at the DMV down here are very anal indeed. The out-of-state driver license I have now is different from my full BC name so I have to have a court order for a name change just to get a stupid driver license. Since I have to legally change my middle name by court petition anyway just to get a Sooner license, I've decided to go further and change Howard to George. This way future employers can't detect those misdemeanors on any background check since my little rap sheet has Howard as my middle name. Since I have to pay court fees anyway, I thought I may as well evade detection of those little raps by future employers. Kill two birds with one stone.

Posted:  7 months ago

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How old were you when you started driving truck?

Sure Todd.

Don't know about this TODD dude, PackRat, but sorry if I bragged on myself a bit too much. I do envy any successful CDL holder here to be quite honest. An army 5-ton, even a semi, is really an oversize tinker toy. Those Allison 5-speed auto transmissions in the M900 series are junk but I do love the smooth and quiet non-blown Cummins 855's those things sported under the hood. Maybe TODD was my name in a previous lifetime. General Patton thought he was once Alexander the Great and latter on Napoleon. President Trump thinks he's Patton come back to life.

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

New cdl driver with fresh felony conviction

Ive been out of prison for 10months obtained my class b cdl 8/6/19 And getting doors shut in my face.wht road should i take

I have a couple non-violent/non-sexual/non-drug/non-vehicle-related misdemeanors on my record but I'm now in the legal process of getting my name changed by a local law firm. Here in Oklahoma the courts don't even run background checks for name-change petitions or ask about criminal history. Just can't be a registered sex offender in Sooner State for name change. I'm certainly not one of those creeps. Basically years ago I entered a plea deal for making verbal threats over the telephone to two bureaucratic college professors and leaving them on their answering machines like an idiot. The police claimed they had voice-print ID technology because I had disguised my voice . The other was for trying to shoplift Walmart for $97 in groceries. Covering the meat up with reusable blue Walmart shopping bags in the shopping wagon and saying "I forgot to pay" didn't cut it in one red state I was in. My lawyer said that case would have likely ended up as a conviction had it gone to a jury trial. In California maybe, but in any red state not. It's tough to plants the seeds of doubt in the minds of jurors in conservative states. They'll darn near hang you for spitting on the sidewalk. The loss-prevention women claimed she saw me cover the stuff on camera and then started to follow me around the store. I suspect that they stated to follow me as soon as I came in the store with a bunch of empty blue bags. This red state, being a red state, is not very environmentally conscientious and I'm perhaps the only person they ever saw using reusable shopping bags. Yes, I'm guilty on all counts. I was caught after all.

Posted:  7 months ago

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CDL school doesn't teach the new drivers everything they need to know to succeed according to Old School and Brett.

It's Todd:

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If I am myself (a newbie) favoring the company-sponsored program approach, then I think this website and its various authors of articles herein are "reaching me" more than they think.

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Rob, may I please ask, who is this TODD person?

Posted:  7 months ago

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How old were you when you started driving truck?

A lot of you have probably answered this question in some manner on here already but how old were you when you started your driving career? 48 for me

age 30, in US Army, year 1994, an M900 Series 5-ton 6x6 tractor (3 axles, rear duals) day cab connected with a semitrailer (two axles, duals) dry-van. Trailer 40-feet long if memory serves me correctly. in Germany, and even on the Autobahn!! Never drove any Class 7/8 or held any CDL now at age 55+. I bet no CDL driver here has ever driven any Class 5 or heavier 18-wheel tractor-trailer on the European continent. The Autobahn or on the cobblestone narrow streets of Europe as I have!

Posted:  7 months ago

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Fatality Due to Apparently Improperly Secured Flatbed Load

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So, how do you three suggest a load like this be secured to prevent movement in a hard brake?

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I give up, so why don’t you tell us?

Bulkhead, of course! Would a football player take the field without padding and a helmet? A baseball catcher without a face mask, shin guards and a chest protector?

Posted:  7 months ago

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Fatality Due to Apparently Improperly Secured Flatbed Load

This fatality apparently resulted from an improperly secured load that shifted during hard braking.

Seventy-six year old truck killed by shifting load

That poor old man might have been saved by a sturdy bulkhead on his flatbed trailer. I would have bulkheads as standard equipment if I were to own any flatbed trailers or flatbed straight trucks. Some dry vans even have bullheads installed inside.

Posted:  7 months ago

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CDL school doesn't teach the new drivers everything they need to know to succeed according to Old School and Brett.

Training doesn’t make anyone a trucker. Just this week we had a young guy went through training done his 35k to 50k miles. His trainer said he was ready. Prime gave him a truck, he went to Walmart decked it all out. Plenty of pictures on fb. First load he had oil pressure problems with reefer, didn’t even know how to open door on reefer. He violated his hours two consecutive days. He was late to his 90. His second load he was posting his weights, said he had moved the fifth wheel three times and couldn’t get it right. Didn’t even know what hole his tandems were in. Prime pulled him back in to go with another trainer. He went to SLC now he wants to work at the prime terminal. Trucking career done!

So, the bottom line is people just fail because they are just incompetent maybe? Was the trainer incompetent? Why didn't this man not know how to open the door on the reefer? Was this man just dumb? Who was supposed to be responsible for training him this particular skill? Whose fault was the oil pressure problems? Violations? Did he even have any HOS training? Who was supposed to train him on moving the 5th wheel? What logical reason would he even need to move the 5th wheel? Did the company even test him on what he was trained before cutting him loose in a rig solo? Do motor carriers expect drivers to be miracle workers? People fail on jobs for a number of reasons: laziness, ignorance, apathy, not serious, they find out in time this whole thing turned out to be really no fun, they hate their employer or coworkers or perhaps lack of proper instruction and guidance.

When I was in army basic, I seriously had doubts that I would graduate in my third week. I had trouble with the PT part. I was no athlete. I was falling out of the formation on runs, at the double time. I had trouble with push-ups. A number of the the young men and at least one drill sergeant were telling me I would be recycled (restarted) through the basic training program all over again if I failed my PT final test or I would be put on the Dog home in shame. I asked myself what the devil was I doing here. What wildest thing did I get myself into? But when all was said and done, I did graduate through faith in God and went on to a full seven total years of honorable military service. In time my PT test scores even got decent though never maxed out.

I think I might have a ghost of a chance to make it as a driver provided I take the preferred route of company-sponsored training. The company will invest in me and make sure I know what I'm doing so I won't be as likely to fail on their time and on their dime. I do understand that companies are committed to driver success when the dump money and resources in to rearing them up. Time will tell.

If I am myself (a newbie) favoring the company-sponsored program approach, then I think this website and its various authors of articles herein are "reaching me" more than they think.

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

CDL school doesn't teach the new drivers everything they need to know to succeed according to Old School and Brett.

Rob D...I am glad your intention was NOT to do something unsafe.

That said, if the average person who knows nothing about trucking, were to read your statement about "Roger That"...very easy to take it at face value as a blanket statement. I had to "check" it, clarifying that is not the way to proceed in this career in most everything. That might not make any sense to you now...but it will eventually.

Here is just one example:

I frequently back-haul water from Nestle', especially during the summer. 99% of the time, it's a "drop empty, grab and GO" with the pre-loaded trailers in the ready line. On this particular day, the load I was assigned to was not ready, meaning I'd have to take a door and wait for a live unload. My hours were short and at the time, there were no "open" dock-doors, all were occupied. Thus leaving me with no alternative but to deadhead back to the DC. I asked the shipping clerk if there were other Walmart trailers pre-loaded and ready. She confirmed there were several, and my load was the only one not-ready.

What do you think I did?

I called Dispatch, informed them of the situation and suggested they swap me with a load that was ready to go and give mine to a driver that was hours from arriving. They agreed and minutes later I had a new dispatch on the QC that I accepted. Point is, I took ownership of the situation and kept moving. Our job is to safely and efficiently move freight from point A to point B. It pays to think outside of the box and not take an attitude of "Roger That"...

Pick your spots...

G-Town, you just gave me an example of whereby being a driver is a "thinking man's position". Apparently, you were smart enough to think about that. It sounds like the smartest drivers will get the richest of the lot. It sounds like you can't always rely on your company to assign you loads in such a fashion that you will max out your paycheck each and every time. Reading stuff by Brett and Old School here, I gather that drivers may have to fight tooth and nail to get loads. No loads, no money for the driver, righto? Unless drivers still get pay for deadheading. I understand they get detention pay, maybe, but most of us would rather roll than wait. The "Roger That" is where a soldier is given an order and nothing more is said. In the military we get a monthly salary, base pay. Drivers get paid by the mile.

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

CDL school doesn't teach the new drivers everything they need to know to succeed according to Old School and Brett.

CDL school teaches you to get your CDL. That is it. I dont think they could make a cdl school long enough to teach even half of what you learn once on the road because a lot of this stuff you will only learn by doing it.

It is really hard to be successful at this career if you need someone to hold your hand. Hopefully while in your training phase you will learn the basics and then be able to apply those to a given situation and adapt.

To sum it up, experience is the best teacher in dis bidness and I gather there will be plenty of hard knocks to learn by. Running out of fuel due to carelessness doesn't have to be one such hard knock. Righto?

But like any soldier in boot camp and AIT (military trade school so to speak), one should get all the basics to advance upon later before taking off on that "solo flight". Correct?

I'd like to think one can be trained a skill set and then fall back upon one's training as his career progresses.

It's apparent that truck drivers can't control many things in their working environment though they are literally in the driver seat but one worth his salt can figure out how to work around all the surprises: unexpected traffic delays, curve balls mother nature throws weather wise, customers whose loading personnel called in sick at the last minute and so on. I'm actually an ANALYTICAL person. I'd like to be in the driver seat but really be "in the driver seat": be a master on how to react to any curve ball fate throws at me! Trucking sounds like a possible chess game on 18 wheels: thinking several moves ahead always. I'm a person who likes to get ahead of the game as far as I can.

Thanks, Big T. That "learn by doing" statement pretty much answers most of my questions.

Posted:  7 months ago

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CDL school doesn't teach the new drivers everything they need to know to succeed according to Old School and Brett.

Time management, load planning, etc. I've read a few articles by Brett and Old School. Surprises and misconceptions and all. I suspect the driver's EMPLOYER will teach the newbie what the school doesn't cover? Is this correct for me to suspect this?

To what extent will the employer train the new driver on things that CDL school didn't cover? I suspect that company-sponsored CDL training will orient the new driver as to how the company does business to some degree. Is truck driving for a person who needs to be always told what to do? Is truck driving a "thinking person's" vocation? How smart or clever do I need to be to make it? Do I have to have a sharp memory as some jobs require? Does driving require a degree of "self-sufficiency"? Will a driver be able to call upon someone (a sort of guardian angel or fairy godmother, army soldiers have the chaplain to go to) should he ever get into a tough rut on the road and can't figure out how to do something? Surely a good mother bird won't push her chicks out the nest until they've mastered flying. I understand that the first year is 'hell year' for the new driver. It is this probation period that will determine whether a driver makes it or breaks it. Could it be that many new drivers fail simply because of inadequate training by their employers? Their employer may have cut the driver loose in a rig with little "getting taught the ropes" of the trade. The articles I read here suggest that newbies surprisingly find themselves with more freedom than they can handle. Many people though they hate iron-fisted authority take comfort in having a supervisor watch them closely on the job especially as a novice. I was a soldier. I constantly had sergeants who told me what to do. They practically breathed down my neck. There is nothing more god-awful than an army sergeant riding shotgun with you in a military vehicle as a driver and an army private and screaming every move to make in your ear. SLOW DOWN! ...TURN LEFT! ...YOU ARE TOO FAR TO THE RIGHT OF THE ROAD! ...SHIFT GEARS NOW! ...DON'T RIDE THE CLUTCH!!!.....TURN YOUR LIGHTS ON! The NCO's tempers and patience were often very short. Have you ever driven a truck at night under blackout conditions or with night-vision googles? I have in the service... No fun!! Sometimes during my military career I would consult a MANUAL that told me HOW to specifically do something. Are drivers issued any sort of company manual for their job? Is there even an operator's manual for the truck they are assigned? You know, like that owner's guide that is in the car's glove compartment?

The mantra I keep reading on this website is 'trucking is not for everybody'. But this can also said about being a farmer, doctor, soldier, sailor, airline pilot, policeman, firefighter, lawyer or hair stylist. It's not a vocation for the masses but still "somebody has to do it". I still believe that the industry sometimes has to settle for less-than-perfect drivers to fill the high demand for them as long as hiring them proves to not be more trouble than they are worth.

Lastly, I gather driving is stressful. What are things that can make the job stressful? Weather? Traffic? Finding a place to park? Backing up in a tight spot for the first time? Mechanical troubles? Run-ins with the police? Accidents? Dangerous roads? Pressure from bosses to meet seemingly impossible deadlines? Other examples? Of course having been in military service, I understand all about job-related stress.

Posted:  7 months ago

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Tractors, Class 7 and 8, never seen (or hardly ever seen) in America anymore by me.

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I've been told that cab-overs were once preferred in the city for tight maneuvers and I would never expect them for long haul usage anyway.

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Cab-overs existed to allow for longer trailers and still stay within the overall length restrictions imposed at many a state level...those restrictions have long since changed. And they were used exclusively well into the early 90s for long haul trucking, especially for coast-to-coast LTL Team driving. Those are the facts.

So...you broached the subject of O/O...

You should read this link before continuing to salivate at the reality of owning a Large Car...Confessions of an Owner Operator

The only time I might try O/O with my own rig is if I were to become super rich as from hitting the super lotto jackpot just to have a cool "hobby" in a Kenworth W900 classic hood. I would never sweat about not making any profit. Otherwise it's become a driver as an employee for a freight carrier for me. Let the motor carrier outfit, Hunt or whoever, suffer the costs.

Posted:  7 months ago

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Tractors, Class 7 and 8, never seen (or hardly ever seen) in America anymore by me.

This is an interesting conversation. I just took a two week trip to Chamonix, France. It was my first time in Europe, and it was a real eye-opener.

The overwhelming impression I came back with is how terrible the quality of our products and services are, and how awful the quality of our experiences are here in the States because we focus on the bottom line with everything we do.

I realize now that we've just come to accept this as normal, everyday life. We think nothing of it, until you go somewhere where quality, style, and taste really matter and where businesses care about your experience with them. Then you realize what a generic, low-quality, crap-on-the-customer existence we live here.

For instance, my plane was supposed to take off at 2 pm. We were told it was delayed, likely for an hour. Three hours later, we were still sitting there without a plane. Finally, they told us they had come up with a solution and we'd fly out at about 7 pm. At 7 pm still no word. Then at about 8 pm they told us our plane was delayed overnight. They said they would give us hotel vouchers. We waited in line for two full hours, and just before it was our turn a lady from customer service told us our particular plane (we weren't the only one) didn't qualify for vouchers, so we should come back for tomorrow's flight at 7 am. It was 10 pm and we were on our own. Too bad for us. We sat in an airport for 8 hours being lied to and then literally kicked to the curb with no assistance of any sort from the airline.

How the hell can you do that to people?

Easy - that's the most profitable way to run the airline. Sure, it's a miserable experience for your customers and they feel like jerks for giving you their business, but when they report the earnings to Wall Street they're going to look great. Since all of the airlines do things that way in this country, there's no better alternative. That's just how you get treated.

By the way, if you fly on an international flight and you get delayed overnight, by law they have to provide you with a hotel and transportation to that hotel. My flight was a domestic flight here in the U.S. so they could legally kick us to the curb for their screwup and laugh all the way to the bank.

But that's only one tiny example. Everything over there was so much better than it is here. The coffee and pastry, the beer, definitely the food, the architecture, even their clothing styles. Everything there was about quality, taste, and a good experience. It was absolutely fantastic.

Think about this............here are the top luxury fashion brands in the world according to CNBC:

  • Louis Vuitton - $28.6 billion
  • Chanel - $20 billion
  • Hermes - $16.4 billion
  • Gucci - $12.9 billion
  • Cartier - $7.7 billion
  • Tiffany - $5.6 billion
  • Dior - $5.2 billion
  • Burberry - $5 billion
  • Prada - $4.8 billion
  • Lancome
  • Yves Saint Laurent
  • Bulgari

Only one of those is from the U.S. and it's Tiffany's. They don't even make anything, they're just a store that sells other people's products.

Here are the top luxury cars in the world. Only two of these are from the U.S.

  • Ferrari
  • Lamborghini
  • Jaguar
  • Mercedes Benz
  • Aston Martin
  • Porsche
  • BMW
  • Bentley
  • Rolls Royce
  • Bugatti
  • Audi
  • Maserati
  • Cadillac
  • Pagani
  • Lexus
  • Volvo
  • Koenigsegg
  • McClaren
  • Tesla
  • Accura

I could go on all day with any type of product or service you could imagine.

I know someone who worked for the U.S. subsidiary of a company based in Germany. Whenever the Europeans would come over here they dreaded it because the quality of everything we have is just junk - junk food, strip malls, p*ss-water beer - everything is just really poor quality. I didn't understand what they were talking about until I went over there and saw the difference. Wow. It's depressing!

People famously say, "America: love it or leave it" because apparently, no one here thought of the option of improving it!

Donald, it's true - everything we do here is a chase for the almighty dollar. Fortunately, it worked - this nation is rich as hell. We're the largest economy in the world.

Unfortunately what often gets set aside is product quality, tasteful design, and customer experience.

By the way, I'm already planning on going back to Chamonix to ski and climb two more times this winter. It's surprisingly cheap to go there from the East Coast. It's cheaper for me to visit Chamonix than it is the West Coast of the U.S.

Brett, I noticed LINCOLN (Ford Motor Company) isn't even on that list. No surprise. Their flagship Navigator SUV is not even putting them on the top list. The Lincoln automobiles were renowned back in the days of those huge, heavy Continentals and Town Car boats. Cadillac today is now junk. No more true heavy all-American boats, Fleetwood Brougham, from them either. Think Chrysler Imperial from the 1950's - 1970's. My favorite personal vehicles of today? Toyota Corolla and light trucks, Tundra not Tacoma.

Posted:  7 months ago

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Tractors, Class 7 and 8, never seen (or hardly ever seen) in America anymore by me.

The KW T680 does have a badge on each side of the hood. Has been there for several years.

Actually this KW T680 model has a KW emblem on the side, yes. Only the "classic" look current-production KW models (W900, T800, C500) still have the word "KENWORTH" spelled out in bold silver letters on the sides of the hoods.

The T800 is common for construction use these days. Cement mixers, dump trucks, etc. It's sort of a classic-aero hybrid for style. A radical sloping hood with a conventional-look square front grille, classic-look cab and classic fenders. I think the T800 has a shorter wheelbase than the W900 for tighter tuns. The sloping hood probably gives nebbert driver visibility than the W900's high long hood. The more modern "retro-look" KW model, T880, disposes of the classic KENWORTH hood letters. Here is a sweet red T800 day cab with a nice chrome tank trailer, a T680 still probably makes more sense these days for OTR use, the T800 seems more like a truck for short haul or construction:

View post on imgur.com

Posted:  7 months, 1 week ago

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Tractors, Class 7 and 8, never seen (or hardly ever seen) in America anymore by me.

In an increasingly competitive market, style simply does not pay the bills. Functionality trumps form.

I'm a practical man. Shiny objects don't do it for me, and I've never felt the need to have them in order to impress others. To me, a tool is nothing more than a tool to help me get the job done.

Don't get me a wrong. I like to looks of a long-nose Pete as much as the next guy. But at the end of the day those looks do nothing for me.

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Where does your pride lie as a driver?

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Being the most efficient, productive, and profitable driver I can be, every day. Getting it done.

If I were to drive, I would take pride in doing things by the book to the best of my ability, doing things safely and in earning good money. New classic-look tractors are still offered by PACCAR with comfy sleeper births for whomever wants one and for whomever can afford one. I've been told that cab-overs were once preferred in the city for tight maneuvers and I would never expect them for long haul usage anyway. Turtle, yes, I'm aware that the most practical things in life aren't always the most stylish. A Roman red 59 Corvette is sweet but virtually worthless. I'm sure the aero-rigs of nowadays make the most "dollars and cents", the most "safety sense" and the most environmental "green" sense. People, after all, use to criticize those stylish Harley-Davidsons for being mechanically crude. That all being said, my heart just palpitates whenever I see an older or classic-model chromed Pete or KW long hood in sweet paint as in my avatar! I just wish Kenworth would put chrome KENWORTH badges on the sides of their aero-tractors' noses (or at least on the outsides of the doors if the stubby aero noses have no room) as they do on their long-hood square-grille gas-guzzling classics but I won't hold my breath until they do.

Posted:  7 months, 1 week ago

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Tractors, Class 7 and 8, never seen (or hardly ever seen) in America anymore by me.

-Ford -Chevrolet -GMC General -cab-over -classic-style conventional tractors as made by Peterbuilt, Kenworth and Western Star pulling trailers for major freight carriers as Swift, Prime, Hunt, Schneider, etc.: "classic-model" tractors are mostly seen by me in logging, construction and in the hands of owner-operators these days

The American highway is now dominated by geeky aero-looking things. The Fonz on Happy Days might say a new Cascadia looks totally uncool. It's a neat treat to my eyes to see a more classic-looking truck sometimes. Modern (21st century) vehicles be it cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles and trains are seldom candidates for blue ribbons or gold medals in the styling department. I guess in 2019, a vehicle has to necessary look "uncool" and devoid of individual personality to be economically sensible.

Do any drivers here still have a soft spot in their hearts for the old-school-style trucks? I'm an Elvis man and not a Justin Beeber man. There was a time when drivers took personal pride in the rigs they drove based upon style and often speed. The bragging rights for drivers these days must be in regards to how much money a year they can net at this craft. Where does your pride lie as a driver?

Posted:  7 months, 1 week ago

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Trucking as a new career

My other half is bipolar as the day is long lol. He's extremely funny, smart, a great all around guy, and an excellent driver.

You can be one too. You'll have to learn to always put on a positive face no matter the situation when dealing with customers and your company. It's not easy for him but he manages to pull it off. He takes Lamictal which is a mood stabilizer. We also have drivers on adderall and a host of other medications. My company will pretty much allow anything that DOT does. All companies are different. We don't have our own school but now offer tuition reimbursement.

But absolutely company sponsored schools should be your first choice.

Motor carriers with their own in-house training program seem the way to fly these days according to the consensus of the folks here. It makes sense to me too.

Posted:  7 months, 1 week ago

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How goaz-zit, folks

Donald continues searching for an edge...

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one more dinky question, G, are the success and failure rates in this business about the same for all age groups 21+, or whatever the legal CDL age bracket is?..... you may have noticed more people of a certain age bracket succeed in driving than others

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My dinky answer; “no way of knowing that”.

I’m sure some egghead analytics junkie has statistics on failure rates based on age...

But does it really matter? No.

Again, the playing field is totally level. Your chance of success is no greater or less than a 21 year old. It’s a matter of personal commitment, desire and focus.

There are over 120 FT drivers at the DC I run out of. There is a cross section of every age, from 21 to 70 and many different backgrounds. Totally diverse.

But again, don’t hang your hat on that.

Donald success in this business is about individual performance. Turn your attention inward, forget about everyone else.

How is the reading coming along...?

thanx, Mr. G, that's all I need to know about age and trucking

this morning I have dental appointment and this afternoon I'm expecting my new exercise bike to be delivered...tomorrow I start my reading in earnest....if I should need any clarifications on this reading material, I'll ask a question....good day and have a safe trucking career everybody!

Posted:  7 months, 1 week ago

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My first REAL screwup

Same thing happened to me Grumpy about 2 months ago. Never had the time too post about it. Almost put 41000 pounds of milk on the ground. I pulled in the yard, popped the brakes and went to start rolling the landing gear. A warehouse worker came over to talk and it completely threw me off. It started raining hard and on that particular day I forgot my rain jacket and thought CRAP so ran over pulled the pin, pulled the airlines and well you know the rest. Just missed it. Now whenever it's time to drop a trailer I go straight to the landing gear regardless of what's going on around me. All in a matter of 10 seconds almost gave myself a very bad day.

just like an airplane......you don't ever want to try to put your bird on the ground without your landing gear down!

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