Profile For Ryan B.

Ryan B.'s Info

  • Location:
    Adrian, MI

  • Driving Status:
    Rookie Solo Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    1 week, 2 days ago

Ryan B.'s Bio

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Ryan B.'s Photo Gallery

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Posted:  1 day, 10 hours ago

View Topic:

Paid CDL Training - Maximum Home Time

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Another flatbed program/training company is Keim ... Keim TS's Breaker!Breaker! Training Classes. If you speak to them, please mention that you've heard of them here!! Yes, you may name drop, haha!! Great place.

~ Anne ~

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Crazy. I did NOT see this message until today (super early Wednesday morning) but I managed to stumble across Keim on my own. They got bonus points because I'm only 2 hours from their training in Wellsville Kansas AND they don't train on weekends so I'm not away from my family for 19 days straight (like TMC). The recruiter at Keim was much easier to talk to. TMC felt super formal and... strict maybe? Keim has a family and relaxed feel to it. Anyway I got my clearance from Keim so now I'm just putting my ducks in a row and getting my permit squared away. Hoping to be training within a month!

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Hay Josh;

Glad you worked it out; you can STILL mention our website at your next intro w/Keim!

TMC is an awesome company, the 'strict' you speak of is the fact that they are known to be 'military' run, 35% of the employees are former military, many having been Marines. I think it's awesome, personally!

Let us know how it goes with Keim; start a diary, PLEASE!

Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

ps: Ryan . . . Trans Am does NOT offer training anymore, at all? It used to be like 2 weeks or so; coming in with a CDLP.. I'm betting that changed with the ELDT mandate 02/07 ..... ? Chickie Monster started with them maybe 5 years ago. Things change, but they WERE big on lease then, too.

1 week training program, but no school through which to obtain CDL.

Posted:  1 day, 14 hours ago

View Topic:

Paid CDL Training - Maximum Home Time

TransAm is a company with its central office terminal in Olathe, KS. Company has a training program, but requires a driver come in with CDL in-hand. There are dedicated accounts available, which I believe can be home daily in some areas. Dedicated with TransAm requires experience, at least last I checked. They will push lease pretty hard, from the word on the street. Don't take the lease bait.

Posted:  1 day, 15 hours ago

View Topic:

Another Driver With A New Gig

History of Barr-Nunn company, includes how company got it's name. (Significance of the name, if any, not identified.):

Article about Barr-Nunn Transportation history

Posted:  2 days, 5 hours ago

View Topic:

DOT Drug tests and psilocybin

ASKinG For a FrIeNd!?!?!?

Does anyone have any idea if these drug tests test for psilocybin or even pick it up???

psilocybin is the active ingredient in shrooms...

would love to get some solid info on this.

Don't get into trucking if you are into doing drugs. Find another career. This is one of two posts where you are resurrecting old threads to comment on something drug related. I don't want anyone out there driving a dangerous piece of machinery who is playing around with substances and trying to find loopholes. I feel pretty confident that other experienced drivers feel the same.

Posted:  2 days, 5 hours ago

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DOT Drug Testing: Urinalysis or Hair Follicle?

I dont know where you guys are getting this info about year long detection... Im not saying youre wrong, but everything Ive seen online states that most substances are only detectable in your hair for 90 days and thats on multiple sites including gov/med sites as well

Only thing that Ive seen that can go that far back (2-5 years) is a spinal tap which supposedly can trace back your entirely life...

If you guys could share some resources stating that it is in fact years please share it.

Ok, it stays in your hair follicles permanently, in theory. Whether or not it can be detected depends on the sensitivity of the test. Government agencies have drug hair follicle testing that goes back years. Trucking companies vary as to the sensitivity of the test. Sorry to say, but it's you who is the misinformed one.

Posted:  2 days, 18 hours ago

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Old Man Leaves Six-Figure Salary to Begin Training as a Trucker- Psychiatric Evaluation Pending

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Well, Wednesday, July 27, 2022, at 7:30 a.m. in Roanoke, VA is test time! I've been through a couple of practice sessions on the driving range over the past week and all has gone well with straight backing, offset, and parallel park. Those are the only three backing maneuvers we will be tested on here in VA. I feel ready and am going for one final practice session tomorrow. There will be three of us from our class testing on Wednesday. Based on what I know of my fellow students, these two who are going with me are both well-prepared and ready to test. Our examiner is brand new, so I guess that could be good or bad. Regardless, if we pre-trip and drive the way we have been trained, it shouldn't make any difference. I'll check in Wednesday after the test with an update.

Is Pre-trip as scary as it looks in the manual? 5 pages of bullet point things to check! I can see doing it with a clipboard checklist. I can't see doing it from memory for a test!

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Hi Josh, Don't let the pre-trip intimidate you. I am an absolute rookie and when I first saw the hundreds of items that had to be identified and checked, I was in shock. I wondered, "How could anyone possibly remember all of these things?" The good news is that your brain is even more incredible than these trucks, and repetition and practice are the keys. Our instructors in school showed us a full pre-trip, gave us the listed items, and then gave us tons of time to practice, both in-cab and exterior. I noticed that when we were given our pre-trip practice time, about half of the class was just goofing off. They weren't practicing and were using the time to visit, look at their phones, etc. There were about four of us that took every opportunity to practice and we checked each other, one of us playing the examiner while the other did the inspection. When test day came at the DMV, how do you think it went? Four of us aced the pre-trip and of the rest of the class, two failed the pre-trip, and the others squeaked by. If you take this seriously, and repeatedly practice, you will be amazed on test day when you find that these items are all locked in your brain, simply because you have been carefully repeating the process, dozens of times. It does not have to be 100% perfect, as a margin of error allows you to miss a certain number of items and still pass. However, shoot for 100% and you will amaze yourself at all you have learned—my best wishes to you on your journey.

Pre-trip for the EXAMINATION is 100% about getting as many reps on it as possible to have it memorized, versus actually knowing about the various parts. Pre-trip once in a truck is knowing the truck being driven everyday, looking at gauges, listening for odd sounds, and a walk around inspection of the items clearly visible to the eye. Most companies that care about safety and equipment maintenance have a maintenance bay into which a truck arriving at the terminal or departing from it may be pulled into for an inspection. Truck checks out with the technician, so anything beyond the items easily visible to the eye should be good until returning to a terminal for another inspection. Check tires, check trailer lines, check lights, check gauges, and observe proper air pressure for brakes. Truck is in good shape to roll every day with that routine.

But, before getting to that latter point, pre-trip for examination has to be nailed down. There are lots of different methods people use to help them. Some sing it. Some dance to it. Some write tons of notes. Some remember it based on experience as mechanics. Some don't know how they did it; they just did.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

Wow Ryan… you are a tough one. Amazing how you’d listen to a trainer no questions asked… but not us. The trainer who stated that to you is totally mistakin’. I’d be happy for him to come onto this forum and support his feckless claim… that said:

During inclement weather, best practice is to turn the CB on and monitor transmissions.

Period.

Although there is no way to answer the question you posed to Brett, common sense and experience suggests that most of these trucks careening out of control either had no operating CB on board, or if they did, it was turned off.

Some things to correct for the sake of accuracy:

It wasn't simply my trainer, a driver with 30 years of experience (29 at that time). It was 4 veteran drivers, all of whom have decades of experience. My trainer was the one with the least among them. One of the drivers has been driving tractor-trailers for 50+ years.

I never said no questions asked. Yeah I would trust my trainer over you. My company has vouched for his credentials. I don't care that there have been bad trainers. Mine is not among them. I don't care that drivers shouldn't be trainers. Mine isn't one of them. If I had been hired by Swift and you trained me, I would feel the same about you because Swift has a proven training program and vouches for the credentials of each of its trainers. It's nothing personal that I would trust my trainer over you and you shouldn't take it that way.

You are right. There is no way to answer that question, just as there is no way to know whether or not any of those drivers had CBs and whether or not any of them were turned on, at least not without an extensive investigation. What you are referring to is conjecture based on an educated guess, not fact.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

Just a funny trucking picture to brighten your day

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Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

Photo uploads working again

Sorry folks! I updated our photo gallery to a new design, which I'm slowly implementing across the website, and in the process, I inadvertently broke our photo uploads here in the forum and the photo galleries on our profile pages. I didn't even realize that had happened for a day or two.

Everything is working properly now. Photo uploads and the galleries are all working.

Anytime you see something not working with the website, just shoot me an email and use "hey stupid" in the subject and I'll know immediately I screwed up.

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Thanks everyone.

Thank you for the work being put in. Much appreciate having a forum like this.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

Just a funny trucking picture to brighten your day

I wish I could remember the particulars of where this was taken. It's a rest area that has steep steps going up to restrooms and vending machines. It's overlooking the Youghiogheny River. Google Photos made a black & white version for me. I will try to post it. I plan to have a print of the b&w made and framed for my dad for Christmas. He really likes b&w nature photography, like Ansel Adams.

Uploaded photo didn't post.

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Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

Should you have a CB or not? Absolutely. In my opinion, it's one of the most important safety items to have. Why? Check out this video. If these drivers would have had their CB on they would have known this was happening and they would have gotten stopped.

Would a GPS have helped them? No. Would their cell phone help? No. The Internet? No. Qualcomm? No.

Nothing but a CB could have allowed these drivers to alert each other as to what was happening.

Are you saying that this accident means that none of these drivers had CBs? I am just wondering how you are able to know that all of them didn't have CBs or didn't have them turned on. If they did have CBs, or at least some of them, doesn't it disprove what you are saying? Not saying that you are wrong. I am asking because maybe there is something that I missed.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

Just a funny trucking picture to brighten your day

I wish I could remember the particulars of where this was taken. It's a rest area that has steep steps going up to restrooms and vending machines. It's overlooking the Youghiogheny River. Google Photos made a black & white version for me. I will try to post it. I plan to have a print of the b&w made and framed for my dad for Christmas. He really likes b&w nature photography, like Ansel Adams.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

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But, for the sake of the topic that came up in this thread, do you have any thoughts as to why veteran drivers would give the advice to a new driver not to worry about getting a CB?

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My thoughts may vary from theirs. Aside from the examples I provided above how it's saved me trouble/stress it could be the cost. Most drivers get started in trucking with hardly any money to their name. However, I'd buy a CB before a GPS or any other fancy gadgets. It can be a distraction if you're playing around on it trying to cause trouble. I got started in trucking at 27 years old. It brought back memories of trash talking on Xbox live as a kid. I did more than my share feeding into people's BS on there while safely parked at our yard beside I35/I80. It's easy to get caught up in a conversation with another driver that takes away your attention, but the same can be said for your phone. If you're doing something like P&D and only staying on city streets a CB would be pretty useless. My trainer at PFG told me the CB was worthless as well, but we spent most of the day on city streets.

You don't need to buy anything fancy or have mods added. Just a simple radio tuned to get you a couple miles of range is plenty. I hear people say they run Google maps to see slowdowns and traffic issues. The problem with that is Google doesn't update immediately. If a wreck just happened you won't know about it the same as you would with someone alerting you via CB. You also run into people adding fake alerts on Google. There have been numerous times on my 3 hour drive back from Kansas City that someone has flagged "speed trap" or "debris in road" every 5 miles and there's no cops around, or debris to be found.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts. It seems that a CB is something that would be helpful to me, but I simply chose not to buy one. I have done pretty well not having it. Could I have avoided some backups in areas by having one? Probably. I am not particularly worried in that regard. I don't lean too heavily on GPS. One of the main purposes for which I use it is quickly planning a route with and without tolls. I have a trucker GPS, but I do check any unfamiliar roads for low clearances and such. I also use GPS as a too to see path from highway to destination address. Google Earth helps with that, too. When I first started, I was a little too reliant on the GPS. I learned that I didn't need it like I thought I did when it quit working because of a failed update. Thank you, again.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

The First Truck Stop You Slept At?

First one for me was Flying J in New Haven, IN. Had just gotten on the truck with my trainer. He drove from the company yard to the truck stop. I slept in the truck and he had dinner with family. I hadn't even gotten my first paycheck, so I didn't even bother going into the truck stop except to use the restroom.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

I too agree a CB is necessary. Sure, most days it's nearly silent my entire shift or you have idiots blasting music. There have been numerous times I've been alerted to traffic at a standstill on the other side of a hill. While I was able to begin slowing prior to reaching the top other drivers locked their brakes up. I've been able to get off the interstate when it's closed instead of sitting in it. Often times local drivers to that area jump on and will give you directions how to avoid the shutdown and keep moving. I've been warned about the roadway turning to ice at a certain marker and able to slow down while I still have control.

The only time I can agree that a CB is a distraction for a new driver is the truck stop. Turn it off as you pull in so you don't have to listen to the people making fun of your skills (or lack of) as a fresh out of school cdl holder. If someone starts blasting music or being stupid on the radio often times turning your volume down for a few minutes, or simply ignoring them will get them to stop. As we approach winter we're going to unfortunately see many pileups. In my opinion, aside from driving too fast for conditions and not maintaining proper following distance, lack of CB radios is why so many commercial vehicles are involved. You're guaranteed to have other drivers warning you. Even if you keep it off except for inclement weather it's a huge benefit to keep you safe.

So, all of what you are saying makes a great deal of sense. I can't to it it any personal experience because I have never owned a CB.

Do you have any thoughts as to why drivers with a great deal of experience would advise that a CB isn't something to worry about getting when first starting? I really would like to just have a conversation on this. I can obviously go back to these drivers, three of them still drive for the company for which I drive, one being my trainer. One of these drivers is closing in on 80 and has over 50 years of truck driving experience.

But, for the sake of the topic that came up in this thread, do you have any thoughts as to why veteran drivers would give the advice to a new driver not to worry about getting a CB?

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

I totally agree with PackRat on this, 100%.

Ryan wrote in his introductory post:

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I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

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Everything? The above is exactly why you should not be offering advice stating that a CB is unnecessary. It's clear that you have yet to experience a situation requiring the immediate need for a CB. But you will... you compared the CB to an i-phone... the i-phone is the number one distraction in the cab of a truck..., NOT A CB.

Please don't read too much into the word "everything." It's a colloquial term that is not intended to be taken literally. It just simply means that I have made common mistakes and have had common mistakes made around me. Have a great day, G-Town.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

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I completely disagree with your point of no CB needed, Ryan. Anyone that states this has no idea what they're talking about. CBs have saved more lives than smart phones.

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You do have a considerable amount more of experience driving than I, so I will hold back on commenting on whether or not you are right. I will simply add that drivers with decades of experience have told me "don't worry about a CB." They never said it can't have its usefulness. They said don't worry about one because they said for a newer driver it can prove to be more of a distraction than a tool.

Obviously, to any other drivers, don't take my word for it because I am 2nd hand information. To the drivers just starting out: Trust your trainers. Those are the ones with the driving experience who are in the truck with you.

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I know I'm correct. If you were thinking, you'd have your own CB, too. Just because someone "trains", that doesn't show they're competent.

You made your point. Have a good day.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

Hi Ryan and welcome. Feel frée to ask any questions.

Ok, going to try not to go fanboy here. When I was first looking at a career in trucking, I had several YouTube channels that I followed for insight into the business. Yours has been one of my favorite. So awesome that you contribute regularly here.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

I completely disagree with your point of no CB needed, Ryan. Anyone that states this has no idea what they're talking about. CBs have saved more lives than smart phones.

You do have a considerable amount more of experience driving than I, so I will hold back on commenting on whether or not you are right. I will simply add that drivers with decades of experience have told me "don't worry about a CB." They never said it can't have its usefulness. They said don't worry about one because they said for a newer driver it can prove to be more of a distraction than a tool.

Obviously, to any other drivers, don't take my word for it because I am 2nd hand information. To the drivers just starting out: Trust your trainers. Those are the ones with the driving experience who are in the truck with you.

Posted:  1 week ago

View Topic:

New to forum; not as new to trucking

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I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

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Hey, Ryan! I feel like you have a cool perspective in that you're experienced enough to be a source of knowledge, yet everything about making the leap into OTR is still fresh in your mind since it's all happened within the past year.

Out of my sheer, "non-driver" curiosity, would you mind sharing a thing or two you wish you'd known right out of the gate? :-) Maybe something that would've enhanced the "good" or avoided the "bad" that you speak of...?

In any case, all the best to ya as you continue along your OTR journey!

Great questions. I wish I had known that time off is often not really time off. What I mean by that is going off duty usually means there is still work to do, like trip planning, paperwork, checking messages for any permanent information, etc. I also wish that I had known how difficult finding a truck entrance can sometimes be. It's definitely not simply put address into GPS and follow it to the destination. I wish I had known how crazy and oblivious 4-wheelers can be when maneuvering around trucks. Lots of people just don't seem to understand that pulling in front of a truck going down hill means leaving lots of space before making the move. I wish I had known how much money can be made, but also how much money can easily be spent, being an OTR driver. A truck driver can make really nice paychecks, but a truck driver can easily run right through it if spending too much time in truck stops looking at all the goodies and gadgets. My suggestion is to get the necessary items and tools, buy healthy food from grocery stores, and stay away from the knickknacks and gadgets at truck stops. Buy headsets off eBay or Amazon. Get a trucker GPS off eBay or Amazon. Get a CB off eBay or Amazon. Or, run without a CB. I still don't have a CB, so it's really not something needed. I had a trainer tell me that it will often prove to be more of a distraction than an asset for new drivers.

I am glad that backing was a struggle for me early on. I mean, it was a real struggle. But, it forced me to work hard on it. Now backing is one of my strengths. I take my time, make smart decisions, get out and look when needed, and go slow. I never refuse help when offered. I show appreciation once the backing is complete. Being a good driver requires confidence, humility, and courtesy. Those three attributes will take a rookie driver far in becoming a seasoned driver with years of experience. At least, many of the long time drivers I have known have had those 3 attributes.

--Ryan

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