Profile For Darin G.

Darin G.'s Info

  • Location:
    Dublin, VA

  • Driving Status:
    Preparing For School

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 months, 3 weeks ago

Darin G.'s Bio

I'm a long time Critical Care Transport Paramedic that is planning on moving over to the driver's seat and going OTR.

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Posted:  3 months ago

View Topic:

CDL written test.... I have questions

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I've been taking the High Road Training and I'm at 95%. I've completed everything but the New York State Coil Endorsement portion and I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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Electronic logbooks can go down for any number of reasons. You will be required to keep 8 blank paper logbook pages on the truck with you, in case that ELD does go down. You will need to know how to fill out a paper logbook, in the unfortunate situation that it does occur. ELDs are pretty reliable, but issues do occasionally occur.

NOW you're just being silly; computers never go down! LOL I didn't think of that and didn't know about the 8 page contingency. Like I said, I have a pretty good grasp but as someone else said you won't know what you don't know... so I'll go back and cover those pages thoroughly. It doesn't make much sense to ask advice and then ignore it.

Thanks to everyone's replies; I look forward to getting on down the road with this, pun definitely intended.

Posted:  3 months ago

View Topic:

CDL written test.... I have questions

double-quotes-start.png

I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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I have a good grasp and I do understand the importance; I just didn't go through every one of the pages. I am getting all the answers it throws on them correct now. I'll go back and look at them though as I am finished up to the NY requirements, which I know now I do not need.

Thanks for your help!

Posted:  3 months ago

View Topic:

CDL written test.... I have questions

I've been taking the High Road Training and I'm at 95%. I've completed everything but the New York State Coil Endorsement portion and I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

That all being said, since I'm testing in Virginia for my CDL, should I worry about the New York State Coil Endorsement portion? Will that be on the test at all?

Thanks in advance for the awesome insight I know you all will provide.

Gil

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

I wanted to post one more time to say thank you to everyone for your replies.

I had adopted my dog from a rescue organization and I also reached out to her former foster family to see if they would help.

They were more than happy to help us out so Mazie will have a place to stay that she is familiar with when I finally get on the road.

My plan now is to go part time with my current employer and start the next feasible CDL course. After that, I'll find an employer and get through my training without having to worry constantly about my 4 legged friend being neglected.

After that, I'll look forward to seeing you folks on the road!

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

Thanks for your reply; I have to admit my age is something I worried about.

I'm also open to local opportunities as well and I know some trucking companies offer both local and long distance jobs that may help me through that.

Depending on the opportunities where you live, it's entirely possible to get your CDL and begin your driving career local, without ever spending a night away from home. I'm one of many drivers who have done it successfully. And at the age of 57 BTW.

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she stays 14 hours a day alone while I work

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This is good, because even home-daily jobs tend to be long hours so this ability of hers will be tested. And you'll want a petsitter on standby just in case you have a breakdown a couple hundred miles from home that results in you running out of hours and having to sit for ten hours off-duty before getting back. It happens.

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Going OTR for the long haul has been something I've wanted to do for a long, long time

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Going the local route can get you out of your current job rut, and might turn out to be something you'd enjoy. But if you have the OTR dream, it's definitely not that. It's more of a routine, doing the same routes to the same places day after day. Many of us have responsibilities at home that preclude hitting the open road for weeks at a time, but that doesn't mean we can't pursue a version of this career. And I'd expect a year or more of satisfactory local Class A driving would shorten the training period at an OTR carrier, but most will still require you to do a few months solo before you can bring along a pet.

Posted:  3 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

Thanks, I'll look into them!

TransAm has a training program that lasts one week at one of the company's terminals. I think they train at 3 terminals, but don't quote me on the number of terminals. I believe that they allow pets, but it would be best to contact TransAm. The company does not have CDL training, so you would have to get your CDL on your own before going to orientation.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

That IS a thought...Dobson is an hour from me! The problem is that Mazie is a rescue and is dog and cat aggressive (she wants to fight everything). She was abused in the past and prefers men over women and can't be around kids as they freak her out. Once she warms up she's OK but she bit me a couple times before she got accustomed to me. This is why I'm thinking a boarding situation would have to be how I go.

What is your location? I will keep the little guy for you. Va/Nc border is where I am located. Sounds crazy but let me know!!!!smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

Thanks for your replies; I really appreciate what you're all saying.

To answer some of your questions though- I need a change because I've been in this field a very long time and it's wearing on me. Most people really don't realize the amount of suffering, death and dying we see and it takes its toll. I've been doing this since 1987 off and on and nothing but since 2005, including 6 years in Iraq as a bodyguard/medic. While I don't see trucking as an 'easy' job or even stress free, the stress level would be far lower than what I currently do and the type of stress would be a welcome change.

Driving is something I truly love to do and I do realize that being a professional driver OTR is not the same as driving the family car although in the EMS world, making long distance Critical transports we are stuck in the vehicle without the possibility of breaks except to fuel many times. I also realize that there is a fair amount of work involved in pretrip preparation and inspection and that handling a combination vehicle is far different than what I usually drive but I do have a lot of varied experience with large RV trailers, etc and I don't feel this will be the problem.

"Mechanically minded" refers to the fact that I'm not stepping into a completely foreign world; it was irrelevant, actually but what I meant to establish is that I'm not coming in with absolutely no knowledge of anything and that I can adapt easily to this type of work. Ambulances go through daily pre-trip check offs that include mechanical as well as medical equipment inspections. I don't have a pie in the sky view of this career; I know it's not just sitting back and watching the miles roll by.

I'm thinking going to a CDL course locally might be better in that at least that portion of it will be shorter as I'll be home every night rather than being gone for that as well.

My concern, really is how long I would be gone while in training? Is it going to be 6 weeks at a time with a trainer or would we be on the road 5 or 6 days and home for a day or two? If that is the case, I can better handle that.

I'm not THAT old...lol I'm 57 and plan on working another 10 years minimum.

My pup does like to travel and I currently live in my RV which isn't huge so she can handle smaller space.

Again, I really appreciate all of your perspectives and I just needed to get my concerns out there to hear different opinions of things and also see if there was anyone that had a better idea of how to get my way through the first part of training as I don't really have any family she can stay with.

Thank you all and I look forward to hearing from anyone else that would like to put their two cents in. You all will think of things I don't.

Posted:  3 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Older potential driver and trying to overcome one obstacle that would prevent me from moving forward.

I've been a critical care paramedic for a long time and I need to change. Going OTR for the long haul has been something I've wanted to do for a long, long time and something I'd be very good at; as it is I'm used to driving long distances and I love to drive. I am mechanically minded and diligent in my pursuit of safety.

My small problem weighs about 10 lbs though; my dog. She's a rescued Chihuahua that is completely bonded with me and I cannot see boarding her for extreme amounts of time during training. I can shorten the time by attending a local CDL course that would let me be home every day (she stays 14 hours a day alone while I work) but boarding her for weeks on end while I go through the trainer portion would be very hard on her.

I honestly believe I will be able to prove my competency quickly with a trainer and I'm wondering if any of you know of a company that might be willing to work with me to overcome this obstacle so that I can move forward?

I appreciate any help you can provide.

Gil

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