CDL Written Test.... I Have Questions

Topic 32548 | Page 1

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Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been taking the High Road Training and I'm at 95%. I've completed everything but the New York State Coil Endorsement portion and I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

That all being said, since I'm testing in Virginia for my CDL , should I worry about the New York State Coil Endorsement portion? Will that be on the test at all?

Thanks in advance for the awesome insight I know you all will provide.

Gil

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Darin,

should I worry about the New York State Coil Endorsement portion

No, you should not. That's only for New York State drivers.

From Commercial Driver License - Metal Coil Endorsement:

Motor Vehicles, Department of State Commercial drivers in New York State need a Metal Coil Endorsement to transport metal coils. The endorsement is needed if the weight of a single coil is 5000 lbs or more, or if more than one coil weighs 5000 lbs or more when bundled together.

You said:

I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

It's very important to take the logbook rules section of our High Road CDL Training Program. Electronic logbook devices will correct you if you make an error, but they won't teach you the logbook rules or how to maximize your available time.

It takes quite a while to understand the logbook rules, and real-life experience with it will be a huge help. If you want to take your written exams for your CDL permit before studying the logbook rules, that's fine. But make sure you go through that logbook section, possibly more than once, before you begin your schooling. It's critically important to understand the rules fully.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar
But make sure you go through that logbook section, possibly more than once, before you begin your schooling. It's critically important to understand the rules fully.

#1 on this. You won't know what you don't know until you fully understand the HOS rules.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

double-quotes-end.png

I have a good grasp and I do understand the importance; I just didn't go through every one of the pages. I am getting all the answers it throws on them correct now. I'll go back and look at them though as I am finished up to the NY requirements, which I know now I do not need.

Thanks for your help!

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been taking the High Road Training and I'm at 95%. I've completed everything but the New York State Coil Endorsement portion and I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Electronic logbooks can go down for any number of reasons. You will be required to keep 8 blank paper logbook pages on the truck with you, in case that ELD does go down. You will need to know how to fill out a paper logbook, in the unfortunate situation that it does occur. ELDs are pretty reliable, but issues do occasionally occur.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I've been taking the High Road Training and I'm at 95%. I've completed everything but the New York State Coil Endorsement portion and I admittedly didn't really go through too much of the logbook stuff as it says it's not on the test (#1) and I can be reasonably sure that whomever I go to work for will have digital log books that will take the thinking away for me (#2). Please correct me if I'm wrong.

double-quotes-end.png

Electronic logbooks can go down for any number of reasons. You will be required to keep 8 blank paper logbook pages on the truck with you, in case that ELD does go down. You will need to know how to fill out a paper logbook, in the unfortunate situation that it does occur. ELDs are pretty reliable, but issues do occasionally occur.

NOW you're just being silly; computers never go down! LOL I didn't think of that and didn't know about the 8 page contingency. Like I said, I have a pretty good grasp but as someone else said you won't know what you don't know... so I'll go back and cover those pages thoroughly. It doesn't make much sense to ask advice and then ignore it.

Thanks to everyone's replies; I look forward to getting on down the road with this, pun definitely intended.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

In regards to the logs, it's not just in case your ELD goes down, rather it's the understanding of HOS as a whole and managing your clock that is necessary. It comes with experience and time, but it's a good idea to get the jump on it while still concentrating on what's first up for you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

I agree with the experts above, and can tell you in the company-sponsored training I'm going through, we fill out paper logs every day for practice. I'm glad I had a grasp on it from the High Road here so I can focus on other important things being thrown my way.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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