Profile For Chris M

Chris M's Info

  • Location:
    Pinson, AL

  • Driving Status:
    Rookie Solo Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    4 years, 7 months ago

Chris M's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Chris M's Photo Gallery

Page 1 of 13

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  5 hours, 20 minutes ago

View Topic:

Home time Parking

Blain's farm and fleet in Woodstock looks like a good place to try, depending on if that's close enough to you. They've got a pretty big lot and may be willing to work with you

Posted:  13 hours, 58 minutes ago

View Topic:

Home time Parking

You can ask around at any of the major retail stores, any place with a large parking lot. Think of any places you've ever seen a truck parked in your area and call and ask. Remember the age old adage, it never hurts to ask lol. Also you can check with self storage places. Often times they have even and boat storage areas and they may be willing to let you pay a few bucks to park there for a few days a month.

If you wanna say what city or town is closest to you I'd be willing to look at Google maps and see what I can find that might work.

Posted:  2 days, 12 hours ago

View Topic:

Swift Non-Smoking Trainers

I've got my dog with me. I've been asked on numerous occasions if I wanted to be a mentor and have always declined. I don't wanna leave my dog at home if I don't have to, and I would never want to put a trainee in the position of having to "deal with" my dog at a time that's already stressful enough.

Posted:  1 week, 6 days ago

View Topic:

Welcome to flatbed

If you picked up a pre-loaded trailer, it would be very tricky (but not impossible) to put the belly straps in. Most flatbedders have some sort of homemade tool that they can use to fish the straps through those tight spaces.

Just to expand on this really quick, I bought an extendable paint roller from Walmart and took the roller part off. I use it for running belly straps through loads and it works like a charm lol

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Motion sickness and training

I struggle with motion sickness badly. I can get sick within 10 minutes of riding in the back seat of a car. I took the Dramamine non-drowsy formula. I took it on the greyhound ride from Atlanta to Salt Lake City, and also took it once I got on my trainer's truck and it always helped me. But eventually I got used to the truck and it was actually a lot easier than riding in a car. Good luck!

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Swift or Western Express?

I don't have any experience with Western Express, so I won't speak about them.

I've been with Swift for 2 years, and have not experienced anything like the horror stories that you can read online. Every negative I've experienced, has been handled with courtesy.

The biggest thing I can say about Swift, is there is a real effort being made right now towards attracting and keeping good quality drivers, and efforts to change their overall reputation.

In my experience, if you can't be successful at Swift, the problem is you, not the company.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Blown-over trucks...gale-force-winds safety question

Office buildings very rarely blow over in heavy winds. Just food for thought.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Log Management ... HOS

As for hounding the fleet manager, I don’t know, never been comfortable doing that either. Squeaky wheels get the grease but can also get replaced. Once again, may just be my outfit, but every decade+ driver I’ve talked to has said there is no need to hound the fleet managers-you get what you get. I honestly get all the miles I can handle most weeks, and have never once called my fleet manager to complain. I feel doing a good job with a minimum of fuss sends a statement of its own to my fleet manager.

I agree with this wholeheartedly. I have a great relationship with my driver manager (fleet leader/manager at other companies) and I never have to hound him for loads. I know that if I'm not planned when I get unloaded, he is very aware of that and he is working with our planners to get me planned ASAP. Me calling and hounding him only takes his attention away from another issue he may be in the middle of.

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Log Management ... HOS

Actually, I disagree with the thought that your method is the "only" or "best" way to get miles. I average 3400 miles per week and take a 34 hour reset regularly. The truth is daily clock management has greater impact on your miles per week, than managing yourself to have consistent recaps does.

Neither way is specifically "better" than the other. However, advising new drivers to "not accept" loads that require 10 hours of driving per day, is definitely flawed advice.

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Reefer trailer

Yes that means that there is something requiring your attention. On your Reefer control panel, go to the page that shows your error codes or fault codes and see what it says. Don't ignore that yellow light!

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Knight-Swift merged but still different?

The Bass Pro Shops analogy is pretty much spot on. Basically, the corporations merged into a single corporate entity (Swift-Knight holdings I believe but don't quote me on that), but the two companies are still being run as separate operations. The biggest change was that Kevin Knight now runs both. But we don't use Knight equipment or facilities as Swift drivers.

Posted:  2 months ago

View Topic:

Split Sleeper Birth Question

I understand your desire for a routine. I was the same way, and that's kind of why I chose flatbed. It tends to be the most routine of all the divisions, I think. However, you can never count on anything being routine in this business.

I just wanna second this really quick. I've done refrigerated, dry van, and now flatbed. I have definitely found flatbed to be more prone to some semblance of "routine" regarding day-night cycles at least. This really comes down to the fact that there are a higher percentage of customers who are not 24 hour facilities. A lot more 7am - 5pm places.

I typically am able to do 4/5am starts the vast majority of my days, fit my driving/loading/unloading into a 12ish hour window and repeat. As of the last 4 weeks, I'm averaging 3311 miles per week. Unless you're on a strict dedicated route, that is very rare in the dry van/reefer world.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Moving closer to terminal worth it?

For OTR, no. Moving closer to a terminal will not affect anything. Move anywhere you want to as long as you're in their hiring area still

Posted:  2 months, 2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Before sleeper cabs

My great grandad was a truck driver (unfortunately he passed years before I was born). My grandmother has a few pictures of some of the trucks he drove. He would tell her stories about his trips and he would take a blanket and pillow, and when it was time for bed he would stop and sleep on the bench seat just like that. I've got nothing but respect for those guys.

Posted:  2 months, 3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Time to buy a CB radio

The only way a cb is a waste of money is if you buy one and then choose to leave it turned off. At that point, yes you've wasted money.

I leave my cb on all day, and have had a few of those times where I was able to get off the interstate before reaching a major issue, and save time driving past all of the traffic that's sitting still.

Also, a few of the places I go to regularly, use a cb in the guard shack. They have a set channel that you tune to, and you use that to check in, and get your loading instructions. Very valuable there.

I've even had very intriguing conversations on the road with other drivers. If I get into an area where there are a couple of "unsavory" fellas spouting nonsense back and forth, I'll turn the volume down for a few minutes, but that honestly doesn't happen too often.

And lastly, don't forget that in a week the Colorado chain law is back in effect. That's the first sure sign that winter is right around the corner. The cb is VERY handy in relaying road conditions to other drivers not far behind you, as well as the oncoming traffic.

So yeah I would classify the cb as one of those valuable tools that you would much rather have when you don't need it, as opposed to needing it when you don't have it.

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Trailer Socket and Pigtail

I carry a bag of zip ties with me. I'll get a trailer like that every so often. I'll zip tie the plug into the socket and then report it and get a terminal to fix it when I get the chance. I wouldn't take it upon yourself to try to fix it, just make it work until you get to a company terminal.

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working Load Limit question

It is totally OK to have different chains with different WLL ratings on the same load. What OS meant with the weakest point statement, is regarding each individual piece of securement.

On each piece, you'll have your securement device (chain), 2 anchor points, and at least one tension device (binder). So if your chain is rated at 11,300 lbs, but your anchor point or binder is only 5,600 lbs, then the lower WLL is your legal number for that specific piece of securement.

You can use a 1" strap, 2" strap, 4" strap, 3/8" chain, 5/8" chain all on the same load, and the WLL is only relative to each individual securement device.

Back to the original question, I can definitely see how that is confusing without having the full context of the actual load. I'm not really sure why it is that way.

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working Load Limit question

The only time your piece of securement is rated at its full capacity is if it is attached to both sides of the trailer.

I hate when I hit submit instead of preview lol

Posted:  2 months, 4 weeks ago

View Topic:

Working Load Limit question

Was there more before the question that could have alluded to the securement method?

If your piece of securement, chain in this instance, goes from the rubrail, to the item being secured, and back to the same side of the trailer, then it is only rated at half of the WLL that it is designed for.

This also applies if the chain goes from the rubrail, directly to the item being secured.

The only time you're piece of securement is rated at its full capacity is if it is attached to both sides of the trailer.

For instance, on a "shotgun" loaded coil, your first 2 pieces of securement should be chains in a horseshoe shape. You attach to the rubrail, go up and through the eye of the coil, and then come back to the same rubrail. So that chain is only qualified as half if it's legal WLL. Once you do the same on the other side of the trailer, you have 2 chains that are both individually half of their own WLL, but that effectively adds up to the WLL of one chain.

Does that make sense? That's the only explanation I have for the question.

Posted:  3 months, 1 week ago

View Topic:

Driving and Handling an Automatic in Mountains, Downgrades etc.

Never start down a steep grade in "automatic mode". Always slow to a safe speed, and put the transmission in "manual mode". As Old School said, each transmission has a different way of using that feature.

Page 1 of 13

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More