Profile For Ken G.

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    7 years, 2 months ago

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Posted:  4 years, 4 months ago

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Heart of The Matter

Usually heart procedures and some medications require you to wait 90 days before driving commercially. It would be wise to spend the money and get a DOT physical before you go to school. You don't want to take any chances with this. Talk about it to the recruiter also.

But I definitely wouldn't overlook this, be sure to do your homework before going.

Thanks Daniel B., That is good advise. I had not thought about getting a DOT physical prior to school.

Posted:  4 years, 4 months ago

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Heart of The Matter

No.

Ken, there are a lot of folks out here on the highways who have had by-pass surgery. You will be fine. Medications will need to be approved but that shouldn't be a problem.

Thanks old school. I have been on this site from time to time for a couple years now. I have had to jump through a lot of whoops and spend quite a bit of money in order to get my license back. I am very close to that goal. I intend to start CDL training in the fall if I can obtain some prehires. While there are issues that may affect my ability to land a job as an otr driver. It is great to know that this latest health issue will not affect my goal.

Posted:  4 years, 4 months ago

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Heart of The Matter

I recently had heart bypass surgery and now need to take meds. Will this fact keep me out of trucking?

Posted:  4 years, 11 months ago

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What would you do part 3

So I got permission from Daniel B so that I didn't totally hijack his idea lol.

Even tho I'm not a veteran yet, this is the situation I had on the load I just delivered and I feel it fits into this category well. I'll try to give every piece of info I have and if you have any questions feel free to ask them.

So we start the day in Norfolk Virginia with full hours and 48 hours available on the 70. The pickup location is a small mom and pop cold storage run by a just a single man. There is no pickup appointment. Only instructions to call 1 hour before arriving.

The delivery is for 04:00 the next morning and the actual miles are 78 empty and 373 loaded.

On the previous night we were at a receiver until 21:00 with only enough time to drive to the truck stop down the road and shut down.

At 07:30 we're able to start the day with 78 miles to drive to the shipper and full tanks of fuel. The route is U.S. highway 17 until you reach the county road that the shipper is on.

So after 45 mph speed zones and construction, it takes 1:45 to arrive at the shipper and then 45 minutes to be loaded and ready to roll. It is now 10:00

So we've got 9:15 on our 11 hr clock, 11:30 on our 14 and the 70 is of no concern.

Now comes the issue. There is no certified scale close by. The route information we're given says to take highway 17 back to Norfolk then U.S. highway 13 for the majority of the trip.

Paperwork shows 40,601 pounds. I know that my tare weight (empty weight) with full tanks is approximately 36,000 lbs rounding up.

The nearest cat scale period is 43 miles in the opposite direction of the route we are supposed to take. The nearest scale on route is at the truck stop we left this morning. 78 miles away.

Looking at the atlas we know that we will not be crossing any weigh stations no matter which way we choose to do this.

So, do you drive out of route to the closer cat scale to ensure that your weights are legal, or do you stay on route and stop at the first scale you come to which is 78 miles away?

You do have the authority to go to the closer scale but you do have to then come back to the route given to continue the trip.

As always, vet guys please let the rookies have a fair crack at this before you jump in too much.

I would stay in route. This would save time. If you weighed and found you were over on legal gross weight you could always make decision at that point. If your weight is good you can make any axle adjustments and proceed. Thus saving a lot of time. Time is money.

Posted:  5 years ago

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High Risk

Hey Ken, congratulations on the hard work you've been doing to stay sober, I salute you!

I agree with Phil, I don't think the SR-22 is going to have any effect on your ability to pursue getting a CDL. I'm a little concerned that you may need to have that license back for a period of one year before you can obtain your CDL. I'm not really sure about it, but that may be the case.

Here's what I would do if I were you. Get everything cleared up and paid, and get that license re-instated. As soon as that is done, and you have it in your pocket, go and talk to the folks at the DMV and tell them you just recently got your license re-instated and you would now like to know if you can go ahead and pursue getting a commercial drivers license. If they say it is okay, then I would start working on getting some pre-hire letters from trucking companies. Take a look at this link on Understanding Pre-Hires to help you understand what I'm talking about. If you can get some pre-hires then you will know that you are hire-able. Phil can tell you it can be difficult with a DUI on your record. The older it is the better off you will be, but if there are multiples it could be pretty dicey.

Don't waste any money on truck driving school until you know that you can get hired. You can always come in here and ask us questions as you progress toward this goal. We will do what ever we can to help steer you in the right direction.

Again, congratulations, and keep plugging away at this. Sometimes progress just takes a lot of little steps in the right direction until one day you realize you are there.

Thanks Old School. I intended on waiting till I had my license back for a year before applying for any pre-hires. I have read Understanding Pre-Hires. I have been coming to this site for a couple of years now for information and I have never left disappointed. This site is awesome and the people here are top notch. I may not always like the information I get here however I know it will be up front and honest and that is all anyone can ask for. Thank you.

Posted:  5 years ago

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High Risk

Having an SR-22 for your personal car shouldn't even be a factor. But what will be a factor is your offenses. Since your MVR shows the date of the offense, not when you paid it or resolved it in court, my advice would be to keep quiet about the SR-22 unless asked. The age of your offenses and type of offense like DUI will be what matters. I had multiple DUI's (3) that were from 22 years ago and some companies look back 5-7 years, some have a one dui in a lifetime policy, and others will accept dui only with prior trucking experience, no matter how long ago it was. You can go to the DMV and obtain your complete MVR and see what it says, but I wouldn't worry about what type of auto insurance you are required to have, that should have little to no bearing on trucking.

Thanks for the information Phil C. I do have multiple dui's ranging from 1977- 1997. I have no violations from 97 till present. If they only go back 7 years should I list anything prior to that? They way I figure it is connected with homeland security so they can find out.

Posted:  5 years ago

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High Risk

I have been working on getting my license back for a couple years. I had been under suspension for many years due to fines, court cost, and reinstatement fees. My actual offenses occurred over 15 years ago however I had reconciled myself to not driving until I had a minimum of seven years sobriety. I knew as long as I neglected to pay the fees and fines I would be unable to obtain a license. I will be getting my driving privileges back in January since all fines and fees will be paid by then.

One of the stipulations required is that I obtain high risk insurance. I will probably be required to maintain this for a three year period. My question is will I need to wait three years to be considered for employment in the trucking industry?

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Ability to be hired

Felonies will never totally stop being an issue but they get better the longer it's been since you were in trouble. Since you do have a felony background you will need to keep your safety record almost completely clean.

It's been 17 years since I had done prison time and with some places it can still be an issue. The problem never goes a way. So there are two things you can do to get companies to over look your background. 1) have a perfect or near perfect safety record. 2) Longivity. The longer you stay at a job the easier it is to get another one later.

Thanks

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Ability to be hired

Thanks. I appreciate you taking time to respond to my question.

Felonies will never totally stop being an issue but they get better the longer it's been since you were in trouble. Since you do have a felony background you will need to keep your safety record almost completely clean.

It's been 17 years since I had done prison time and with some places it can still be an issue. The problem never goes a way. So there are two things you can do to get companies to over look your background. 1) have a perfect or near perfect safety record. 2) Longivity. The longer you stay at a job the easier it is to get another one later.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Ability to be hired

Hello all' I would like opinions on getting hired after the first year. My problem is my driving record has issues the last was almost 20 years ago. And I had a felony 8 years ago. I know it will be difficult if not impossible to get hired. So if a company will take a chance on me would other companies tend to over look my past issues after a year or two of experience or would it continue to be an issue?

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Off duty time

Ken, I do this a lot because it conserves your seventy hour clock. Like GuyJax said I recommend that you do it as sleeper berth. You should also remember to always log some time as on duty while there. Instead of going straight from driving to sleeper berth, allow yourself fifteen or twenty minutes of on duty time. That way if your logs were to be checked by a D.O.T. officer you are in compliance for showing some on duty time for getting unloaded or loaded.

Thanks Old School. I think I read in a previous post that you should show 15 to 20 minutes after arrival as onduty time.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Off duty time

Ken, I do this a lot because it conserves your seventy hour clock. Like GuyJax said I recommend that you do it as sleeper berth. You should also remember to always log some time as on duty while there. Instead of going straight from driving to sleeper berth, allow yourself fifteen or twenty minutes of on duty time. That way if your logs were to be checked by a D.O.T. officer you are in compliance for showing some on duty time for getting unloaded or loaded.

Thanks Old School. I think I read in a previous post that you should show 15 to 20 minutes after arrival as onduty time.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Off duty time

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The way I understand HOS rules if you back into the dock you can go off duty while truck is being loaded or unloaded is this correct?

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Actually no you cant. Off Duty means you are out of the truck and have absolutely zero responsibility for the truck which is not the case.

You log it as Sleeper Berth cause you are not working and as far as anyone is concerned you are taking a nap.

Ok off duty sleeper birth and you can do this as soon as you bump the dock. Correct?

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Off duty time

You can go off duty on the logs...but it does not extend the day. Your 14 HR clock starts the second you go On Duty for thqt day and need to get your On Duty Driving done in that window .

Yea that was my understanding. Thanks for the confirmation.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Off duty time

The way I understand HOS rules if you back into the dock you can go off duty while truck is being loaded or unloaded is this correct?

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Site change

Unfortunately that's not possible right now. But I'm sure its on Bretts to-do list.

Thanks

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Site change

Hello everyone. I have not been to this site in quite some time. It has changed a little since my last visit. Is it possible to see all posts made by one individual?

Posted:  5 years, 10 months ago

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Average Miles

Thank you for your answers Old School you nailed it with some very informative information.

Posted:  5 years, 10 months ago

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Average Miles

Indeed Ken there is no set answer to that question - at least not one that's very helpful. Here's what I mean:

Different types of freight tend to have different lengths of haul. Refrigerated runs tend to average longer than most other types of freight simply because they run more coast to coast runs than other types of freight.

Other than refrigerated, it's impossible to even give a helpful number really. Take major dry van companies for instance - they'll have local divisions where guys just stay around their home town and make short deliveries. They'll have dedicated accounts where some people are running 100-300 mile runs day in and day out while others are running 1500+ mile runs regularly. Then they'll also have team trucks that mostly run 2000+ mile runs. All of this is going on every day at most major dry van companies.

Now what would be a much more helpful number would be average paid weekly miles. This is rather consistent throughout the industry. Your first year on the road there's a steep learning curve and you'll become exhausted more quickly than an experienced driver so it's good to expect about 2200-2700 miles per week your rookie year. But that's certainly not set in stone. Some people will push harder than that.

Experienced drivers usually shoot for 2700-3200 miles per week. Once you've been out there for a while you adapt to the change of lifestyle and you learn how to get the job done more efficiently out there so you can increase your miles without exhausting yourself any further.

So regardless of the company you work for or the type of freight you haul you can expect weekly paid mileage to be in those ranges. It could be a little less at times, especially with flatbed because of the time it takes to load and unload, but you'll get paid for the extra work so it evens out.

Any trucking company can give you their stats for average weekly miles per driver and average length of haul. Just ask the recruiters - they'll have those numbers memorized.

Thanks Brett, I had not thought about asking the companies.

Posted:  5 years, 10 months ago

View Topic:

Average Miles

Ken, I don't know if anyone can give you an industry average on all types of freight. I will say a few things that might help you understand how all this comes together in a drivers experience though.

I drive a flat-bed so my information is based on my experience, but I think I have a fairly good understanding how this works industry wide. You are going to get some short hauls and some long hauls. The dispatchers have goals set before them by upper management that requires them to try and get so much revenue per truck and loaded miles per truck, things like that. The efforts to reach these goals are sometimes rewarded with bonus pay to the load planners and dispatchers. Often times short haul loads pay more per mile so that helps the dispatcher reach those revenue per truck goals and of course the long hauls help him reach those loaded miles per truck goals. The driver, of course, is just looking for the most miles he can legally accomplish each week.

I get a good mix of loads, but very seldom will I get anything under 500 miles. I usually average around 1,000 miles per load. I had two loads this month that were just under 200 miles, and we get paid more for those short runs so you can't really complain about it too much, oh I guess you could, and I know people that do (they're truck drivers - complaining seems to be in our DNA). If I could get about six or seven of those short loads in a week I could make just as much as I would running about 2500 miles, of course with flat-bed work I'd be working my tail off too with all the tarping, and load securement.

The one thing about loads that people don't seem to understand is that some pay better than others. Quite often your dispatcher may take a load for you that doesn't pay so well just because the destination point on the load will put you into a more desirable freight lane. There are areas of the country that pay better than others and that sometimes changes with seasons and other economic forces at work in the market place.

I don't know if I'm just rambling on to hear myself talk or if I've even answered your question or just danced around on the fringes of it a little, but if it needs further clarification just let us know and maybe someone else can jump in here and do a better job than I did.

Old School you nailed it. Thanks, that answer was very informative

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