Profile For Old School

Old School's Info

  • Location:
    Nacogdoches, TX

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:
    Old School On The Web

  • Joined Us:
    6 years, 12 months ago

Old School's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

Old School's Photo Gallery Group 1 of 31

Page 1 of 424

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  23 hours, 12 minutes ago

View Topic:

Putting trucking on hold for now

You’re always going to need nurses!

Nurses and hospitals will always need truck drivers! All those medical supplies don't just magically appear! Somebody delivers the stuff they use on a daily basis. Also it's truck drivers who haul their medical wastes away for them. Most people don't realize how intrinsic truck driving is to all facets of our economy. Logistics keeps our economy in good order.

When trucks stop, anarchy begins.

Posted:  1 day, 3 hours ago

View Topic:

Just quit the worst, best paying job I've ever had. When to say enough is enough?!

What is the ratio of psychos to monks in trucking? From what I read on this forum about the monks interactions with other drivers, my guess is its about 75% to 25%, based on Turtle saying that about 75% of Prime's drivers are L/O.

I honestly have no idea what the ratio is.

Your extrapolation (based on Prime's percentages) would be inaccurate though. There are both personality types within the L/O and O/O community. I know several L/O's on my dedicated account who are very calm and very professional.

Don't get the idea that leasing or owning a truck only appeals to certain personality types. The appeal lies mostly in pride and the desire for a higher income. These are parts of human nature that are common in all persons. We try to help people analyze that appeal from a business-like approach. If you can look at it from that perspective you usually realize it isn't all that appealing after all.

Posted:  1 day, 11 hours ago

View Topic:

Putting trucking on hold for now

Joel, that sounds like a wise decision. Trucking isn't easy to break into. Doing it while raising a family just multiplies the issues. There's no shame in stepping back.

The two of you realize there's going to be issues, and you're making a plan - that's a solid approach. Trucking isn't going anywhere. It will be here looking for drivers whenever you get ready.

Of course you can stay in here if you like. One of our long time members, "Big Scott," was in here with us for years before he ever became a driver. You can learn a lot by just being a part of the conversations.

Posted:  1 day, 11 hours ago

View Topic:

Just quit the worst, best paying job I've ever had. When to say enough is enough?!

I've cussed out other people on other jobs, it's trucking, goes with the territory

That's really classy Joe. I run the Northeast all the time including the Bronx. I've never felt the need to tell my customers to eff-off. The only territory that goes with is your own territory - there's a reason for that.

For the newbies in here I'm happy to stand up and tell ya there's a lot going on here in Joe's tale of woe, but it's certainly not typical of any of the professionals in my circle of truck drivers. You can be a professional out here. You can keep your cool under pressure. Unfortunately our friend here hasn't figured out how.

You'll often see two main personality types in this job. I call them the "psychos" and the "monks." One group knows how to stay calm under all kinds of pressure. They get things done despite all kinds of issues. The other group likes to display their testosterone levels like it's some sort of badge of honor.

Most of them are really miserable and can't wait to get out of trucking all together. They like to sit around talking about how bad trucking is. They always point their finger at their company, their customers, or the industry itself. They aren't happy, they aren't productive, and they've always got someone to blame. Misery loves company, which is why they always want to hear about your tales of woe.

Posted:  1 day, 17 hours ago

View Topic:

? concerning my DOT physical

Well, we don't normally "beat" people.

It would help us decide to "beat you" or not if you gave us a reason for the beating! smile.gif

Posted:  1 day, 17 hours ago

View Topic:

? concerning my DOT physical

A one year card is not a problem.

Your post has me puzzled though. You didn't say if you are on blood pressure meds. That is typically the reason for a one year card. Usually if you're not on blood pressure medication and your blood pressure is too high, they only give you a three month card so you can get the medication going and come back later to be retested. They don't just issue a one year card because your blood pressure is too high.

Remember, you will go through another physical at Prime. Each time you get a new medical card the prior one is no longer valid. If you are not taking blood pressure meds and your blood pressure reads correct at your Prime physical, you may end up with a 2 year card after all. But, if you are on blood pressure meds you will always get a one year card even if your pressure reading is good.

It's not a problem. The industry runs on blood pressure meds and coffee. You're in good company.

Posted:  1 day, 19 hours ago

View Topic:

Passed my test yesterday

Congratulations Johnathan!

That's a great accomplishment - I know you're feeling good about it, and to be honest we're all proud of you.

Now... let's talk straight. You are just getting started. There's so much to learn. There are so many experiences you've yet to encounter. If you are like most of us, you have no idea what you're getting into. It's a great career with lots of challenges. Brett always says, "Trucking is an extraordinary career that requires extraordinary people."

You are now entering the part of your new career where many people quit before they even make a real start. I'm wanting to prepare you, or maybe to warn you that it's about to get tough. This is where you will determine your outcome in this endeavor. Many people set a precedent for their career during the first three months.

My advice: face each challenge, whether it's mental or physical, with gusto. Learn to be positive and get positive results. Accept your responsibilities and don't waste time laying blame on others. You'll steer your future in the right direction this way, and you'll get through your time with your mentor easier also. There's more to the mental challenges in trucking than there is to the physical aspects. They can both be exhausting at the beginning, but maintaining the proper attitude will help you tremendously.

We are excited for you, and proud of you at this point, but we will know you've really outdone yourself when we hear of your one year anniversary at P.A.M. Hang tough Johnathan - show us how it's done!

Posted:  2 days, 1 hour ago

View Topic:

Community college as a means of getting my cdl?

Joel, I'm thinking you're confused on this, but I can't be sure. Please verify this with your recruiter. I'm pretty sure McElroy will pay your tuition, and you sign a contract to work for them for one year. Ask your recruiter if that's how it works.

Posted:  2 days, 17 hours ago

View Topic:

Tools needed?

I use a small 2 pound sledge hammer.

Posted:  2 days, 17 hours ago

View Topic:

Got accept to PAM transport

Congratulations Country Boy!

Have you invested any time in our starter kit? There's a lot of great information there.

Posted:  2 days, 18 hours ago

View Topic:

Sleeper floor clutter?

No, you're not getting a ticket for clutter. Having a dashboard full of clutter may get you a little more attention for an inspection, but there aren't laws against clutter.

OMG, if you could only see some of the abandoned trucks I've gone to retrieve. Clutter is not even a word that comes close to describing them.

Posted:  2 days, 18 hours ago

View Topic:

Tools needed?

Jim, after almost seven years out here, I can tell you what I've used the most.

Hammer

Flash light

Wire cutters/strippers

Electrical connectors

It's not going to be common for you to turn any wrenches on your truck. You'll have scheduled maintenance visits at your terminal where the mechanics will make sure everything is up to speed. The most common things I end up doing myself are replacing lights and/or mudflaps on trailers. Other than that I've had very little need for tools.

Posted:  3 days, 2 hours ago

View Topic:

Community college as a means of getting my cdl?

Joel, people misunderstand our push for Paid CDL Training Programs all the time. We teach best practices here. We want to see the folks who come through here succeed. We see many people fail - most of the time it's those people who think they've figured out the best way for their particular situation. Often it is just to satisfy their spouse. It's exactly as Brett described it - short-sighted.

Trucking is a huge Commitment. There's no getting around that. Remember that old saying, "Happy Wife - Happy Life?" You guys need to be on the same page. Right now she knows less about making a good start at this career than you do, and you know next to nothing. Now you're taking her lead. Does that really sound like a good plan?

Just for perspective... Brett and I both went through private schools. I had a terrible time getting hired. I've proven to be really successful at this career, so it wasn't anything I was doing wrong, and it wasn't my age. Don't even think the demand for drivers guarantees an easy time landing a job - it doesn't. They have accused us of getting corporate kickbacks and money under the table for pushing these Company Sponsored Programs, but it's all hogwash. We do what we do because it gets the best results.

Posted:  3 days, 2 hours ago

View Topic:

Test date on the 26th. Looking like I’ll be a professional truck driver. Questions on trip planning

Google Earth is a great tool. It gives you a visual of the whole area. It's really helpful for finding entrances and seeing where trucks are at your destination.

Here's how I trip planned as a rookie. It's helpful, but takes a little time. I would write down my whole trip turn by turn from start to finish. I'd use my Atlas, the company 's suggested route, a trucker's GPS, and Google Earth to put that together. I no longer need that kind of detail, but I still recommend that method for newbies.

As you gain experience you'll find yourself relying more on signs and gut instincts based on what you are observing and what you know.

Posted:  3 days, 4 hours ago

View Topic:

My Truck Has Been Sold...What!?

how the heck did you know I'm a fan of the death/speed/thrash (whatever you wanna call it) metal genre?

You've told us before. That's how they know. You just didn't realize how people read this forum and remember the things they discover about you.

Posted:  3 days, 22 hours ago

View Topic:

Oops! SWIFT pulled their job offer!

There's that higher bar I'm referring to. You are now in a very high risk category of potential drivers.

Posted:  3 days, 23 hours ago

View Topic:

TXS secure yards

Chris, large fleets have their own secure yards strategically located across the country. I would assume these yards are for smaller independent O/O's or small fleets. I honestly am not familiar with them or the use of them. To be honest, I'd never even heard of them until you asked this question.

Posted:  4 days, 1 hour ago

View Topic:

Heading to Swift in Menasha, WI Monday 9/23!

One of the things people can learn from your experience is that these opportunities you've been given have no guarantees. You have got to show them you're worth taking a risk on. That's a much higher bar than when the company has some skin in the game. You are much more likely to be let go than someone they trained through their program. It's possible for you to perform better than one of their students on the driving tests and still be determined as insufficiently worth the risk involved in putting you on the payroll.

Keep that in mind. You have got to excel. Your experience is so limited that it puts you into a very complicated category. You need to really shine and present an attitude that says you're humble/teachable and very able to get this done.

Posted:  4 days, 2 hours ago

View Topic:

Heading to Swift in Menasha, WI Monday 9/23!

Rest is up to me, eh?

Marc, I got sent home three different times. At my fourth orientation I determined "if this is going to happen, it will be because I made it happen." It wasn't easy, i ended up with a lousy trainer. But what I learned while with him has been the very key to my success.

People who really grasp the concepts of success in trucking are fiercely independent. They face conflict and challenges with a tenacity that won't back down. My trainer and I started team driving on my second day. From that time forward he slept while I drove all through the night - I always had the night shift. We crossed the country about three or four times like that and then I was given my own truck. I learned everything on my own - most of which was learned by finding out what not to do!

Get your mind right before you ever get in the next truck. What I mean by that is determine that you will make it happen no matter what distractions or impediments arise. Get on the bull and stay on it for the duration. It's not easy, but worth all the effort.

good-luck.gif

Page 1 of 424

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More