Comments By Craig T.

https://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm171/craigtsao/photo%203_zpsnrvzugnl.jpg avatar
  • Craig T.
  • Joined:
  • 4 years, 4 months ago
  • Comments:
  • 50

Page 2 of 3

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  3 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Trucker diet need help

Hey Robert, how bad do you want to lose weight?

My suggestion is to make it the most important thing you have to do and not forget about it. Everyday. No soda at all. No candy at all. If your only option is a hamburger then don't eat. Drink water instead.

In fact, sleep more than anything and drink water all day. I know you're trucking and you don't want to pee so much but water and sleep are the two main things by far. I'm 162lbs and I drink up to 1/2 gallon of water by the time I've been awake for 90minutes and I don't eat until at least 1 hour after hydrating. Then I'll finish that gallon by the end of the day and preferably drink more.

Easy things to eat without cooking or keeping a fridge in the truck include copious amounts of whatever nuts you can tolerate in abundance. Tuna and salmon are easy to stock up on. I do bread, hummus, cheese, avocado, and whatever else I want to slap on there. Things like sandwich meats, yogurt, and other refrigerated products are typically good for a couple days assuming your truck isn't 80+ degrees inside. Trust me; I know. I used to backpack eggs and not cook em until I was 4 days out in the wilderness just because I could. Speaking of which, nothing wrong with eating the same things over and over with military discipline. Maybe oatmeal (no sugar) for breakfast everyday. People on a serious budget or Spartan diet do nothing but beans and rice which is real easy to cook.

Don't worry about stocking up on protein. I personally don't think you need to count calories and fat either. Just don't let your discipline fail when you get groceries and when you get hungry.

Feel free to message me if you need more ideas

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Wal Mart Parking

Got a message on Qualcomm yesterday that no Prime trucks were allowed to park overnight in Wal Mart store parking lots effective immediately. Has anyone driving for other carriers heard anything similar? Or did Prime do something so awful that they were singled out...?

It was not for Prime specifically as far as I can tell from one of the messages. Holiday shopping is basically the reason used. As for the Walmart in Springfield, I heard it was because it basically turned into a hobo camp with many truckers tossing their DEFICATIONS and other trash in the lot not even trying to at least hide it in trash cans 5 feet away.

Truckers who drop bags of actual crap, jugs of ****, and garbage bags right out the door when they leave their parking space are why many places stop allowing overnight parking. It's as if they are dedicated to making the world a crappier place.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Does anyone keep a memento of where they have trucked?

My trainer was obsessive about circling every place he has picked up and delivered in on his atlas map.

I recently started using an app called Places I Pooped. Whenever I take a dump and have cell phone service, it lets me drop a new pin on a map and write a crappy note about it. I've got quite a potty mouth and the puns just don't stop. If anyone else starts using the app, please let me know so I can follow your, uh, you know... poop

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

International pro star or freightliner cascadia?

I drive a 2014 prostar. Yeah, it's a rough ride but I'm the one driving so it's not like I'm loosing any sleep because of it.

The odometer just ticked over 250,000 miles. Been driving it for about 4 months now and have only had an external coolant leak that needed to get repaired. No leaks or electrical issues.

Most people prefer the Cascadias over International. Seems like the ones who take an International do so for the compartment space above your head.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Sleeping in the truck without being bothered?

I've gotta say that there are times when my sleep is very erratic. There's no such thing as a sleeping schedule when you drive OTR solo and run hard.

In regards to getting knocks on the door, I have to say most of the time when I am getting inconveniently disturbed from me sleep is when I'm at a shipper or receiver. For example say that I'm on a tight schedule and had to drive out my 11 hour clock to make it to a receiver at 1am. At 4am I get woken up by an inconsiderate lumper for my bills when my appnmt time is 9am. On top of that, they need me to move to a door at 5am. Then wait until 8am for the office to open. Then stand in line for awhile. Then when you finally get unloaded, you're not allowed to stay on premises and you need to leave. And since its a tight schedule, yeah, you may want to get going as soon as your hours are back.

In cases like these though, your dispatcher owes you. Just try not to be a grumpy bear about it and your dispatcher will love you.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

Pointers for a newbie

You don't know what you don't know. Ask every question that you think of and you will still end up scratching your head from time to time when you go OTR. Just keep on trucking. You'll get it if you just don't quit. Or manage to never fall asleep behind the wheel or something.

Sorry, I suck. I just prefer to emphasize mentality over all else.

Posted:  3 years, 7 months ago

View Topic:

What's so bad about the Northeast anyway?

Spend a few weeks trucking along through Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, and the like. Get accustomed to the simplicity of following i80 back and forth. Then find yourself in the Northeast. It's just not as simple. The whole entire vibe gets thrown out the window, run over a few times, and maybe set on fire.

Posted:  3 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Starting out. Question about Prime recruiting...

It would help to call during the hours recruiters are actually working. Try between 8-5 central time on a weekday.

I'm not sure if it's all kosher to post the number of my recruiter when I was getting started, but you can message me or whoever else drives for prime if you want a specific number to dial.

Posted:  3 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Questions about Prime's Lightweight tractors

You're not going to fit two team drivers in a lightweight. There are lightweight Cascadias but, seriously just go with the full size one for teaming. You'll make more team driving anyway. that .03 cpm is the incentive for a solo driver to take a lightweight.

I'm not sure what kind of idea you have for the downtime regarding driving reefer but you can mostly run as hard you can if you really wanted to About 90% of the time if your dispatcher trusts you can/will handle it. If you want to take it easy, I guess you just need to have a good relationship with your dispatcher. But usually a good relationship entails you working really hard and the dispatcher loves sending you the work. Then you just take the time off for yourself by scheduling it or doing excellent Pretrip planning.

As for the hammock, I'm just going to say that's not going to happen. I don't know what kind of hammock you use, but my backpacking one needs a lot more space than what you can spread out in a sleeper cab. It would also be recklessly dangerous while the truck is moving. You can get jostled up pretty good back there. Which, btw, is another really good reason not to team drive in a lightweight. It's a bumpier ride. In theory, I can see why you would think it's safer, but just wait until you feel your codriver hit the brakes brakes hard while you're sleeping back there.

As for the TNT Phase in prime, you're gauranteed 700/week if you're available to drive that week so it's not like you won't be earning something.

Side note: if I remember correctly, there's a 3 heartbeat rule per truck. So you can have maximum of 3 living things per truck if so.

Posted:  3 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Transferring my CDL to California

High road will do just fine

Posted:  3 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

Any homeless Truckers out there?

I've updated my LinkedIn account and online dating profiles with the title "Tax Paying Pseudo Hobo"

Before trucking I got rid of a lot of things. Such as TV, fast food, a bed, and basically my whole apartment. Cleansed my life of burdens really. That was so I could live out of a backpack for 9 months travel trekking. Gained all kinds of friends from all over the world and a new perspective on life.

Do that kind of lifestyle and trucking is easy. I've come to work in the most sight changing office window I could think of. So money is just building up in the bank since I'm not blowing it away on nonsense. Will actually take a long leave of absence when I hit my 1 year mark for another big adventure. Which I guess could be constituted as nonsense but it's every worth every penny to me.

My personal tip; don't do hotels or allow yourself to hole up in isolation when you're not trucking. Always go for the hostels. You're far more likely to meet interesting people. If you're in a big city, you're more than likely to meet traveling foreigners that are fun to hit the town with. It's also cheaper.

My thing is to look for state parks I can truck in and go hiking/camp the night. I also love to rock climb so I hit as many rock climbing gyms as I can all over the country. I've got a skateboard and bike to get away from the truck instead of calling a taxi. Yoga classes, places with saunas, steam rooms, float tanks, and museums are what I opt for instead of a movie theater (you'll be sitting enough).

Don't get me wrong, trucking is hard, long, tedious work. So take time to play and enjoy yourself. I find myself smiling almost everyday when I start the engine and hit the highway. Simple things like a good song, audiobook, or podcast get me stoked to have nothing to do but drive for 10 hours. Remember to sleep, get exercise everyday, eat well, drink a lot of water, and you can have a good future ahead of ya. Keep in touch with people and go out of your way to make hanging out with them possible. I mean, I'll park my truck in Pennsylvania and take the train to NYC to visit friends. Or they'll come scoop me out of a truck stop and next thing I know, I'm driving a 4 wheeler around San Francisco.

Make it happen, captain. Mentality is everything.

Posted:  3 years, 8 months ago

View Topic:

How does a truck driver protect themselves

Stay alert. Keep your eyes up. Don't look like an easy target - tired, not paying attention, head down looking at your feet/phone, distracted...

Your best weapon anywhere and everywhere is to Trust your instincts, use uncommon common sense, and don't let more than one stranger approach you if you're at a place like West Memphis.

As a deterrent when I know I'm in a bad place by myself, I openly carry a heavy flashlight that's designed to crack skulls if need be. But the best feature of the flashlight is its ridiculously bright beam that is quite blinding when pointed in your general direction. Again, just don't be the easiest target. If someone is looking to do some mugging, they'll go to the victim not shining a magnified LED into their face.

Posted:  4 years, 1 month ago

View Topic:

My time at PRIME.

My Prime Orientation started 4/20/15.

I've finished my Prime Student Driving phase and will start the team driving phase once I actually make it to the DMV and get everything settled (it's a holiday weekend so I have to wait until at least next Tuesday.)

I wanted to post a journal and what not but I found that on the road I can only view this forum on my iphone. Couldn't reply or post to any threads.

Next time I'm in my hometown I will be switching to an iphone5 but, I can't figure out why I can't post on this website when I'm on the road. When I log in and try, the page basically just refreshes when I click on new topic or reply. Can anyone shed some insight?

And yes, I've been enjoying my training at Prime so far! There has been a lot of hurry up and wait due to a variety of reasons but I'm not complaining. I managed to line myself up with a good instructor as well.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Prime Orientation 13 April

Spent 2 and a half days on greyhound buses. Few hours in on orientation.

Hurrying and waiting.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Prime Orientation 13 April

Update: my orientation for Prime just got pushed back to 4/20 so I may see you there, Logan.

My recruiter said there's been a shortage of trainers and now an overflow of applicants.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Prime Orientation 13 April

I start orientation in Springfield on 4/13 too

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Getting my cdl permit , where do i start ?

Yes, you need a have DOT medical for a commercial permit. Your general doctor can check you out for that. If you intend on doing doing OTR trucking, you'll need to check the box that says Non-Excepted Interstate on your DOT medical form.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

High Road Training Question

I should clarify... the high road program was THE REASON I passed. Not knowing the state specific stuff cost me only a few questions.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

High Road Training Question

I just got my class A permit yesterday. The High Road training program definitely helped a lot. I've been spending about an hour everyday on it for the past couple weeks - not always signed in so my progress isn't up to date but I got to a point where I was comfortable with the material. But I should tell you, DON'T RUSH THROUGH LEARNING THE MATERIAL. Really learn it and pay attention to the information emphasized in the program. Understanding the material is how you learn your stuff so you can deal with the weird wordings and tricky questions on the actual tests.

Yesterday I got off work early and decided to just drop by the DMV and go for it. Figured I could flip through the actual cdl manual while waiting. Unfortunately, there were no copies left in English. There were only Spanish versions good-luck.gif

Considering how I have only gone up to intermediate Spanish in school, I was struggling to get a lot out of it. So that could have been a big contributing factor in terms of "enjoyable" reading but, I can say that it seemed like those books could loose a few pages of filler information you don't need to know.

I aced the air brakes test and missed 1-4 questions each on the others. Took 8 tests in all for the learning permit, some renewals, and the endorsements I wanted... it was a lot, so naturally I made a few bonehead mistakes I could have caught if I just took another second to think about it. Some questions I didn't get because I didn't read or understand enough of the Spanish manual. So it would be better if you fully commit to the High Road program then go over your state cdl manual. Your state may have a few different rules/regulations that you may need to know.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Rush hour traffic?

A lot of places have specific hours of operation. So you can't deliver or pick up unless it's sometime from 11:00-17:00 for example. They also have to schedule you because they're expecting a bunch of trucks and many places don't even have no room for 2 trucks at a time.

Also account for how Atlanta may have a lot of semis returning to headquarters there. There's a lot of truckers that work regular/normal daytime hours and have to punch a clock that's the same as their warehouse guys.

Page 2 of 3

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More