Oh No, My First Recruiter Conversation. I'm Panic Stricken

Topic 12534 | Page 1

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ProudArmyMom's Comment
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After a whole bunch of research & notes (thanks to Trucking Truth), I contacted my first trucking company. I've been thru a lot to get to this point. OMG, some of my info was "old". CDL school? No, we got rid of that option. What? I have notes...read off my payroll deductions for their CDL school. No, we don't have that anymore. What? I have to pay the school outta my unemployed pocket & you'll reimburse me? I staggered on. No school around ATL? No, we are working on that. Ouch. How much of your freight is no touch? That is the deal breaker w/me. Lumper? Oh well, that was a wrap. I'm downtrodden and disappointed now. Are there any trucking companies that are truly (or mostly) no touch? I don't trust my carefully written notes to be the most up to date now. Any assistance would be appreciated. Thank you in advance

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rob S.'s Comment
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5 months with swift and I haven't touched freight. I used their veterans plan so I didn't pay out of pocket.

I can't say they're the best because I have no real experience with the others. There are lots of options for you though.

Craig T.'s Comment
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The only reason I have touched freight driving reefer with Prime is because I opted to do it myself instead of waiting for the lumpers to do it. I knew they were going to take 6+ hours at some places so I got the job done personally within an hour.

You will never have to touch freight at many companies

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

After a whole bunch of research & notes (thanks to Trucking Truth), I contacted my first trucking company. I've been thru a lot to get to this point. OMG, some of my info was "old". CDL school? No, we got rid of that option. What? I have notes...read off my payroll deductions for their CDL school. No, we don't have that anymore. What? I have to pay the school outta my unemployed pocket & you'll reimburse me? I staggered on. No school around ATL? No, we are working on that. Ouch. How much of your freight is no touch? That is the deal breaker w/me. Lumper? Oh well, that was a wrap. I'm downtrodden and disappointed now. Are there any trucking companies that are truly (or mostly) no touch? I don't trust my carefully written notes to be the most up to date now. Any assistance would be appreciated. Thank you in advance

Karen ...have you tried Roehl Transport. They have a terminal in Conley Ga. And run their CDL school in Wisconsin. Kim Calhoun is the recruiter for the school. Give her a call. Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Karen, you have four options for paying your school tuition:

* The one that gives you sleepless nights - pay your own way.

* Find & apply for a grant. I'm not familiar who and how, but other TT people have done this.

Choose A Company first. Then your choices are:

* Make sure they will either get you a hiring bonus of that they will pick up the tab for your tuition.

* Attend their company school.

Both ways you sign a contract to drive for your company, most often for a year. And you are not out of pocket for your school.

Like Rob, I chose Swift. It's a bit complicated, but after one year at Swift, you're out of pocket (payroll deduction) about $1,800 and are free to go. OR, be a Swiftie for two years and they eventually pay you back - it's free!

Your original recruiter may have been playing the salesman's game of "No other school exists in this universe."

Most truckload freight is no touch. Some companies pay lumpers on account, so you don't even have to deal with them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

So you gave it one try...give it 10 more and then 10 more....

Charlie Mac's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately this isn't the 1st time I've heard of others "notes" being out of date. This is why the process of contacting multiple recruiters yourself is so important.

Have a backup plan, and then another. I originally wanted to dive headfirst into Trucking. I've done a fair bit of research and pushed my date back from March until May. I know there will be an influx of hiring during this time & the odds of ending up with my 1st choice company are statistically greater. If not...I have a 2nd route planned; and a 3rd.

I've learned (since joining TT through others experiances) pre-hire letters are typically valid for 30 days. This allows me much more research time, oppurtunities to polish my resume & secure letters from the carriers I want as opposed to grasping at straws during crunch time.

Slow & steady wins the race. Best wishes.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

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