Comments By classA

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  • classA
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Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Schneider decision

I have a big decision to make in the next few days !!!!! Do i take a local Schneider intermodalposition or a brand new home depot run with Schneider. Been going back and forth all day, any type of advice on either of these accounts would be great

Chris

I've been with Schneider for 3 months. They "need" drivers. I've changed divisions twice and am about to do so a third time. You just need that DBL and Account Manager approval. This seems to truly be a driver's market, so you may have some flexibility.

By the way, I've carried the Home Depot trailers. I was frustrated upon arriving at a warehouse in Sparks, NV to have the shipper tell me that I needed to drop the empty trailer I was carrying in the open parking lot, then couple to the loaded trailer in the bay door, move it out to the lot, and then couple to my empty again only to put in the hole where I moved the loaded trailer from. Of course I then had to recouple to the loaded trailer, go in and get the shipper to come out to "seal" it. Afterwards, I drove down the block (literally) to another shipper who broke that seal, loaded more items onto the trailer, and then sealed it again. Eventually I dropped that as a Relay at a lot. Later, I spoke with another Schneider driver and was telling him about the incident. He immediately said, "That must have been a Home Depot trailer. That account always has you do that."

For what it's worth, most of the Trainers at the Schneider facility in Fontana, CA were former Intermodal guys. And the Intermodal are generally driving "day cabs".

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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The Tough Reality Of OTR Team Driving

Even after reading and preparing here for life on the road it's a h*ll of a reality check when you get out there and see how demanding it is, ya know? It's not difficult at all for you to imagine how many people do not prepare themselves properly and are completely overwhelmed by the demands of this career. A lot of people that could have had a great career in this industry never even made it through training when the realities smacked them upside the head. I'm glad you're hanging in there!

Keep at it and keep learning every day. Try like crazy to enjoy yourself as much as possible. I agree with your assessment of running team though. I think it's terrible but others love it. Find your niche out there. For everyone that wants to drive a truck there are great jobs perfectly suited to your needs. In the beginning you have to be patient and take what you can get, but soon enough you'll have the experience to land the job you're looking for.

Indeed. I appreciate your insight, Brett. "Try like crazy to enjoy yourself as much as possible ............" That, sir, is the key that I need to get a grasp on. And I will probably never run Team again. That just isn't for me either. (Thank you, sir, for the "Title" insertion.)

Although as C.S. stated, if you are in it with your life partner and make some financial gains with it, then it can be good. That sleeping thing is still tough as my body simply doesn't agree with any synthetic substances (except McDonald's fries occasionally).

As always, this is a very encouraging community with the truth of trucking.

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Shifting the truck....AAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!!!!!!

Well, we started a day early on our driving. The good first....I can straight back and parallel park decently. Shifting? Thought the tranny was gonna fall out. Instructor taught us how to float the gears. I can go up through the gears ok, downshifting??? OH MY GAWD I am a stumbling bumbling rank beginner. Need help and or tips from the veterans here.....PLEASE.

I, too, had issues with downshifting. What really helped me is I went to www.eaton.com and found a PDF user manual for the Eaton-Fuller 10-Speed Transmission and read it. Then, when I would drive, I could visualize what was actually happening when I'd shift.

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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The Tough Reality Of OTR Team Driving

OTR Realizations -

I just returned from 3 weeks of travel as a team driver. Having experienced both the team and solo driver OTR roles, I can affirm that each deserves great respect for their work. However, the team driver must be especially commended for their ability to adapt to a constantly moving truck. Over the past few weeks I have only been able to sleep maybe 2 to 3 hours straight at the most during any given day. And that was because I literally passed out from exhaustion. My co-driver described it so well, "It's like almost going to sleep and then having someone punch you in the shoulder each time you are about to doze off."

My co-driver and I realized how to manage the 70-hour clock so that it will continually be replenished every 8 days. But subsequently we also realized that regardless of how we worked the 70-hour clock, we still could not make any more money. One hour is approximately 50 miles. 11 hours of driving is approximately 550 miles. Drive less, get less miles. Drive more, get more miles. Drive less, get more rest. Drive more, get less rest. Either way, you can only go so many miles in one hour. It was disheartening to know that there is certainly a defined limit to how much money we could earn even as a team. Basic math.

Let's be honest. Trucking is just like any other career. The advertisements glamorize the money, the home time, or whatever else marketing deems inspirational (the psychology of advertising is to manipulate the thinking of the public and stir an emotional response). But when all is said and done, there are still only so many hours that can be worked on any given day. And there are only so many miles that can be traveled in any hour. I recently had a tight backing situation in lower Los Angeles, CA. It took about 30 minutes to get backed in to the appropriate dock door. After I finished I walked to the dock and asked the dockworker, "I get paid by the mile, so how much do you think I just made backing this trailer in?" He affirmed understanding as we both chuckled. Not to mention the time it takes to get through some of the mountain passes. Remember, the pay is "per mile", not hour in most cases. If it takes 1 hour to go across a 15 mile pass, you are paid for 15 miles (@..30 per mile or whatever the rate is for your gig). I cannot imagine how one earns a livable wage during the winter months when snow and ice cover the road. The chaining and unchaining as required in the Rocky Mountains certainly requires many Hours of Service.

I've actually been disappointed with the money I've earned so far (although I had a realistic expectation). If you take the hours I've worked (driving, coupling/uncoupling, inspecting, trip planning, etc.) and divide them into the paychecks I've received, it turns out that I've been making about $1.00 an hour. That isn't even minimum wage! And the work literally drains the life from your soul. Days away from the solitude of home, family, loved ones, regular showers, relaxation, meals, etc. is very taxing on your being. It can easily be seen in almost every driver at a truck stop. The lack of facial expression coupled with the slow gait is almost zombie-like!

In the team scenario, you drive 5 hours, stop for the 30-minute DOT break, fuel, etc. and then drive another 5 hours (example of time only). Then it is time for your Post-Trip and your co-driver's Pre-Trip. They start driving and you have 2 hours (by DOT regulations) that you can actually sit up front and not be in the Sleeper Berth. After that, you must (by DOT regulations) get in the back and bounce around for at least 10 hours. Afterwards you have to start the process all over again ......... every day ............ never ending ........... over and over and over. And here's the kicker with team driving, the employer expects this every day. I understand why. They make more money with the truck moving. At least as a solo driver, the truck does shut down for 10 hours!

Don't get me wrong. I'm not bashing the career. As most of you know, I'm still a rookie and I am just learning how to work the system. But I wasn't born yesterday and already I see the truth of the trade. Truck driving is obviously one of the most honorable professions out there. It is very demanding work every moment. It requires mental discipline, patience, physical endurance, and many other qualities that must be experienced in order to be truly learned.

Thankfully I have had the benefit of reading Trucking Truth prior to ever becoming a driver. I didn't expect to make a lot of money in the beginning. In any job, one must start at the bottom generally and then work the way up the ladder (pay scale and otherwise). Likewise I do see where it can become a lucrative career over time. I have friends who actually make good money and they are home every night or every weekend. They worked for it though.

This web site has helped me prepare for the reality of the work. And accordingly it has helped me prepare for what can be expected. I'm going to succeed, although I probably won't be a driver for the rest of my life. But I am already a better person because of it. That is the OTR realization that I have so far.

Thanks to all of the experienced drivers here for their insights!

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Just got my license

Congratulations!

I currently work for Schneider on the West Coast. The Company is good to the drivers and honestly, in the short time I have been with them I have not heard even 1 driver complain about working there.

And medical most likely should not be a problem for you. It is all basic standards. Pick up a crate with weight in it up to your shoulders, squat underneath a simulated truck trailer frame, push and pull a fixed object to simply measure your ability to do so, etc.

Again, congratulations!

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Trucking Takes Commitment

Thank you, Old School.

The truth of your post stirred encouragement in me today.

As a rookie I have learned many things about the Truth of Trucking. Some of it has been rather trying. Especially this last week. And the last few days bouncing around the LA freeways had about discouraged me greatly.

I should be on my way home today, but I am sitting at a Company OC in French Camp, CA just beginning a 34-hr restart so I can even go towards home. The last few days alone I have driven literal thousands of miles to, from, and in the LA area.

Spent hours calculating ETA and NAT for loads that never happened pimarily due to no empty trailers.

All the while I have been reminding dispatch where I am, what my HOS are available and how important it is for me to get home. And what do they do? Send me repeatedly to LA for 3 days only to learn that what they wanted to do in theory was not possible. I could see it, why couldn't they?

Thankfully, since I could see this coming 2 days ago and as you stated,, already had determined in myself that I was going to honor my end of the agreement - drive to meet their needs. Even though it had cost me HOS, made me miss my scheduled home time, and been very frustrating, I have stuck it out. And I actually now feel better.

Now, to remembet it the next time I am sitting for the biggest part of 2 days at truck stops awaiting an assignment.

Likewise, I will have to remember my commitment to my meetiing the financial needs of my home.

Thank you again.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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Qualcomm Navigation Error

Everybody knows about Qualcomm's potential to err when it comes to some navigation issues. It might tell me that my destination is on the left in a quarter of a mile when I am looking at it on the right in front of where I am then. It is a great tool however when you use it as just that .... a tool to assist you in reaching your destination. Recently I experienced a Qualcomm error that really took me by surprise. Unfortunately it occurred while I was driving amongst much freeway construction in lower Los Angeles, CA.

Here I was having just completed a 34-hour restart to put a full 70 hours of time into my on-duty bucket. I had showered for 3 consecutive days and filled my belly each day with solid food (and some cholesterol). Likewise I had drank much coffee. The sun was beaming warmly onto my bright orange truck as I flowed with traffic along the interstate. Watching my mirrors and constantly taking a glimpse at the Qualcomm Navigation screen I was headed for what appeared to be an early arrival at a delivery. Suddenly I noticed that the little arrow on my Qualcomm map wasn't moving anymore and the miles were not counting down, nor was the time. It had stopped working! What? "Not now!", I thought. This had never happened to me and the only thing I could think of was to touch the screen to attempt to get it back to working. Guess what happened? It started back working and chirped, "You are out of route, proceed back to the route line behind you." What?

I started looking for somewhere that I could stop and get my bearings on my location. But it was 8 am traffic with cars all around and "nowhere" to stop. I saw another truck getting off at an exit and thought, "If that truck can go there, so can I." All the while hoping for a large lot or somewhere to stop, turn around, etc. As for that truck I'd seen exit, I do not know where it went. The next thing I knew, I was on these little four or six lane streets with nothing but two lane side streets coming into them from either side. Scanning for the best option to stop I decided to turn onto a two lane street that had a store on one side and an open lot on the other. My intent was to turn into the open lot, but once I had turned I realized that there was a post about the size of a telephone pole that was literally going to prevent my trailer from turning through that lot! I had already committed though, so I continued slowly attempting to use every inch of room available to steer that trailer through that opening. Then, I hated it, but had to completely stop. I obviously wasn't going to make it without damaging the side of my trailer. What could I do? Immediately I scanned the traffic, turned on the 4-way flashers, tapped the horn, and slowly began to crawl backwards.

The gap between the trailer and that pole opened up and I could see that the back of my trailer was about to enter the street that I'd just turned off. In front of me there was a car parked on the side of the street that I was able to squeeze past as I noticed a lowered pickup with really dark tinted windows sitting in the street waiting on me to move. I simply held up my arm for a brief wave and quickly shifted into 2nd as I began to pull forward. Thankfully the pickup backed up enough for me to get by. The little two-lane street merged into a 45 degree intersection with two other streets which looked big enough for me to turn around. And it was ...... barely. I got back to the street where I'd came from, stopped and hit Reroute on the NaviGo. "Building route .......," it chirped at me.

After that 15 minutes out of route, I was finally back onto the plotted course towards my destination. Remember I had selected "Reroute"? It took me back where I was, but then turned me off the freeway again onto a two lane side street and the next thing I knew it was telling me to turn around in a little walkway between a divided four lane street. Another 15 minutes ............ and I was finally back on the freeway.

I still arrived within my delivery appointment window where I sat on a side street for over 2 hours waiting to be called into the site yard. All in all, it had been a really educational morning.

A few days later I was talking to another Schneider driver who told me to never hit "Reroute", but rather go back to Home and then search the address as if just starting. He said that way it wouldn't take you to a turn-around route. When I get the opportunity, I will attempt this. It makes sense to me that it would be a better option.

Anybody here know?

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

ClassA I hope you're still out there. I had the same concerns you had in your original post. I had a face to face and phone conversation with some folks. Then I got some good info from a rookie driver

Thank you, Steve L.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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Bathroom and hygiene

Im considering a team otrjob and was wondering how often are you able to realistically shower. also, for teams if you wake up in middle of night can you expect to easily pull over to use a restroom. Im worried there wont be one near by or my partner may expect me to hold it until his next planned stop

I find the following very helpful -

Extremely short hair, baby wipes, and a large, empty Coffee Mate creamer bottle. Pilot and Flying J showers are a nice treat realistically once or twice a week. But I have found that the baby wipes (unscented) are very helpful to maintain clean.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

Hang in there Class A, I've got a feeling from your post that you are going to make it!

Thank you, Old School. So, it is all normal! And with the help of everyone here, I believe I can make it!

I am establishing the being early part as part of my "signature". And I definitely want to be a "go to" guy. And my thoughts on taking the initiative, being proactive on making decisions is confirmed by you. I just need to get the experience. Thank you.

Does the Sleeper Berth time not count against your On Duty/Drive Time even if you've already started the 14 hour clock?

If Sleeper Berth will stop that clock ......... I can work that!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

Brett, in regards to the 34-Hour Restart in CA - I had lots of On Duty Hours burned waiting to be unloaded (actually waiting to be called in from the street to be unloaded at a facility), Qualcomm froze up which subsequently resulted in my getting lost (well, taking wrong turns) that wasted Drive Time in getting back on route. Additionally I had driven hours at 35 to 45 mph through the mountains in Oregon and Northern CA with a weight of 78,000 lbs. Once I reached Fontana I had a little of 10 hours of Drive Time left on my 70 hour clock. And since there is an OC there with free showers and other amenities I decided to make the most of it and do a Reset while there! (Rather than have to do it somewhere that I would not have those benefits.)

And as far as the rest of your responses - Excellent advice which I will heed. The "early" part is already part of my routine. I always try to arrive at pickup and delivery locations early. In fact, I'll drive the most of my 11 hours the day prior to an appointment to arrive as close as possible to my delivery point for the next morning. That way, I can wake up and be there in a short drive. And I see you point about the ETA and PTA. From a logistics perspective I can appreciate that insight. In short, I need experience with this aspect of planning. Your insight is most appreciated!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

ClassA there's a few things here to mention....

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Great people to work with, but rather irritating when you "need" to speak to someone personally ......

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Dispatchers much prefer you to use the Qualcomm, not the phone. A dispatcherwill typically handle 50-75 drivers at a time. They can't handle that many drivers if they're constantly interrupted by phone calls. When you send messages in over Qualcomm they're received just like with email so the dispatcher can pick and choose which situations have the highest priority and deal with those first. So try to avoid using the phone for dispatch. Other areas of the company like safety or human resources it's fine to use the phone, but not with dispatch. Keep dispatch over Qualcomm.

Thank you for the explanation, Brett. I can appreciate that understanding of the situation and it clarifies how I can best utilize the process.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

GuyJax, I've been hanging out in this forum for about seven months. You have pretty much condensed my picture of a rookie's first year into this one post.

My first few weeks solo were horrible as I learned the relationship between Hours of Service rules and making money. ClassA is on the right track!

Thanks, GuyJax, for your insight.

Thanks for the encouragement, Errol V. And thank you, GuyJax!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

Since I run teams I can answer that Simply yes. Teams are treated like kings at almost every company. Newest trucks. Priority dispatch. Basically they get the loads before solo drivers. Teams are jumped ahead of solo drivers when it comes to getting a truck fixes.

In our truck we do roughly 6500 to 6800 miles per week. 3250 to 3400 a week if you spilt it. We even it 7000 miles a few times.

The reason teams are treated better cause they are able to run non stop without having to shut down for 10 hours.

My understanding exactly.

Thank you for the affirmation.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

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Give it time. Things will start to improve. This topic is the exact reason why we always say the first year is the toughest in trucking. It takes time to build up a reputation of being a good driver.

Also to another point you made.... If the only reason you got into trucking if for the money then you will be disappointed the first year. Your first year, if everything goes extremely well, you will make between 28k and 32k. That's pretty standard. The 2nd year will see you close to 38k to 40k.

Remember you are completing against millions of drivers out here for money and they have more experience than you. You can't expect to make what a 10 vet makes in one year even if your making the same mileage pay. Just won't happen while your new to the industry.

This may not have been what you wanted to hear but you needed to hear it all the same. Be patient and things will come together. The world's worse thing to do at this time is to start questioning your company this early. You can have a sit down talk with your dispatcherand let him know how you feel. You can tell him you want/need more miles.

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Thank you, guyjax, for truth!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

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General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

Give it time. Things will start to improve. This topic is the exact reason why we always say the first year is the toughest in trucking. It takes time to build up a reputation of being a good driver.

Also to another point you made.... If the only reason you got into trucking if for the money then you will be disappointed the first year. Your first year, if everything goes extremely well, you will make between 28k and 32k. That's pretty standard. The 2nd year will see you close to 38k to 40k.

Remember you are completing against millions of drivers out here for money and they have more experience than you. You can't expect to make what a 10 vet makes in one year even if your making the same mileage pay. Just won't happen while your new to the industry.

This may not have been what you wanted to hear but you needed to hear it all the same. Be patient and things will come together. The world's worse thing to do at this time is to start questioning your company this early. You can have a sit down talk with your dispatcher and let him know how you feel. You can tell him you want/need more miles.

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

As a whole, Freight is down year over year but not a ton. Freight is also down from April to May. 2014 was a ton of growth in the industry. I have been getting a daily email from JOC.com that has a pulse on that kind of stuff. It cost a ton of dough to get full access, so I just read the headlines and synopsis.

Hopefully the more experienced drivers will be able to help you out on the other questions.

Thanks.

I've seen several articles recently along the same lines. Something to it!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

General Freight Inquiry: Slow?

It is almost like a relaxant to my mental perspective to sit here and read the posts of real people in the trucking industry. I've just returned home today for the second "home time" since beginning with Schneider. Great people to work with, but rather irritating when you "need" to speak to someone personally ....... yet all you get is the automated message, "when you look at your fifth wheel, do you think green?" or "all associates are busy assisting others, please hold and we'll answer as quickly as possible".

wtf-2.gif

Although I have only been OTR about a month I have learned how the system works I suppose. You schedule your ETA later than you will know you'll be there (simply so if worse comes to worse you can be either on-time or preferably early). And when it comes to those pesky questions that you need to confirm with someone about before proceeding ........... just take the initiative and make the decision. After all it is "my" responsibility and "I" am the driver calling the shots during the game (so to speak). And when it comes to those 14 On-Duty Hours, use them each with care! Not to mention those precious 11 Hours of Drive Time. People on the road (other than truck drivers) generally have no idea about how their driving affects these commodities, do they?

Over the past two weeks I have logged about 3,200 miles (about 1,600 a week). Where is the 2,300 to 2,500 per week that the recruiter assured me? The word I have been getting from the DBL Room is "freight is slow". If freight is slow, why are there so many trucks on the road? Or is it because there are so many trucks on the road? Or is because I am still a newbie have to prove myself?

During a 34 hour restart in California last week, I met with some people that I attended orientation with in Fontana. They are driving team (together as long-time friends) and making good miles! Do teams get more freight moving opportunities?

Here's the deal. According to the ledger book, my earnings as a driver currently is less than I could make working at a call center. Bottom line, it is all about the money. I really do need it. Not looking to get rich, but I am looking for some type of consistent, sustainable wages.

Any ideas?

Or is it just the way it is?

Before I go back out next week OTR, I hope to spend some time just chilling here and letting myself relax. And wait until I tell you about my time in lower LA after Qualcomm literally froze! But for now, I must go. Supper at home! Already had that long, hot shower!

Sincere inquiries here, so honest answers are appreciated. Thank you.

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Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

6 Days of Experience Successful with the help of Trucking Truth Community

I do run from Sacramento to Portland once a month or so it seems. One word of caution if you run that route often..... Watch out when your near Weeds CA. From Weeds to the Oregon Stateline can be some awesome winds coming through the mountain valleys.

Anyone that runs that area can tell you. It can be bad at times.

Thanks for the advice, guyjax. I do remember some signs along that way on the South side of Klamath Falls about dangerous winds for the next 14 miles, etc. That is a beautiful area running alongside of Upper Klamath Lake though!

I'll keep those cross winds in consideration the next time I am through that way. I'll admit that I didn't really give it much thought (even after seeing the signs) as I drove through there last time. I could be routed through there today even!

No DVIR Required the past couple of days and it's a new journey!

Posted:  4 years, 3 months ago

View Topic:

6 Days of Experience Successful with the help of Trucking Truth Community

I've been trying to relax and enjoy a short bit of early home-time while the experiences of my first 6 Solo Days OTR keep stirring in my mind. While I often had to step up to the plate and take action without much time for thought, I now realize that I had read about many of those things weeks earlier here from someone else's experience. Their words as well as my CDL training came to my aid. And those 6 days went by very quickly as did my Hours of Service! Many thanks to all of the experienced professionals here at Trucking Truth who openly write of the truth of life as a truck driver.

Anyone considering a career as a CDL OTR driver, I encourage you to read and re-read the articles here at Trucking Truth. The wisdom of those here can help you prepare yourself for what may be ahead for you (especially if you are OTR).

I am the first to admit that just over a week ago I was literally on-edge as I drove a 53 foot trailer through some very tight two-lane highways in Portland, OR. And that was my very FIRST solo driving experience! I was assigned a tractor at the OC where I had my first meeting with my DBL. I spent the night on the yard in it and then got up early the next morning to bobtail just a few miles from the airport to get my first empty trailer. Did I grind any gears? Yes, I did a time or two. But I have found that each time I drive the same truck I have a "feel" for the gears, clutch, acceleration, etc. So, each drive improves. But the I-5 Corridor as well as Highway 97 from CA to WA offered me so many opportunities to transition from one gear to another! And I even had to add extra drive time for planning since at 74,000 lbs. I ended up running in 9th, 8th, and even 7th a couple of times!

By the way, is there any type of driver's education course for those who are NOT driving a 75 foot tractor-trailer at 80k? You experienced drivers understand this, right? I mean, here I have just spent 20 minutes going up one hill at 35 mph and as I am going down the other side just getting the truck back to up 55 mph (the legal speed limit for three axle rigs is 55 MAX in OR and CA) for a short stint before going up another one, a truck pulling a camper passes me ....... and then slows down! What? It caused me to have to engine brake and then immediately begin to downshift. Does that make anyone else upset? That person needed a driver's education course regarding tractor-trailer operation. Next, I ended up losing so much speed that I had to shift into 6th gear at the apex of that hill. That one move by the truck pulling the camper cost me probably 30 minutes of drive-time. And those drive-time hours are precious! Of course, the relatively easy drive on I-84 through OR along the John Day River was the relaxing leg of that particular journey. There are thousands of huge windmills lined across the hills in that rather obscure area. The most beautiful part, honestly, was when I came to that long-needed light on the hill in Biggs, OR (it was a Pilot Truck Stop and I had been driving for hours).

Now it seems almost too easy at times with the Qualcomm Navigation tool. Mine has the voice of a woman who knows it all (literally) or at least thinks so ...... "you are off course, proceed back to the route" ..... but doesn't consider that I can't just turn the rig around anywhere and the voice keeps on chiming the same thing ............. : ) I wish Qualcommette could have heard me when I was routed down some little two-lane highways below Sacramento, CA where I later learned that I could have been ticketed for using it! Yet, I still felt some sort of satisfaction just knowing that she was NOT always right! Of course, later that afternoon, she began to chirp at me again about my remaining drive time ...... for a couple of hours! It seemed to increase my blood pressure every time I hear it as I was down to my last 15 minutes of drive-time with NOWHERE to stop! Then when I was down to 7 minutes of time there was a Rest Stop! I made it! It was in the middle of nowhere with very little light and a train track nearby with a crossing (the train blared the horn each time it would pass by). But I actually slept really good that night after a quick post-trip, brush of my teeth using bottled water, and some short time with my wife on the phone. At the end of my required 10-hour break, I was back on the road as the sun was coming up the next morning. And once again I found myself driving for hours on end until I arrived early near my delivery location, got a great parking place in a nearby truck stop, had some tuna with crackers, and was asleep before dark.

During my short-time out I found myself lonely, emotional, angry, happy, peaceful, content with existence, upset with existence, frustrated, tired, sleepy, hungry, needing to relieve my kidneys most desperately, and even forgetting about my body at some points.

Life OTR certainly takes much energy out of you, but it almost seems to give it back at the same time.

Tomorrow I am supposed to be heading out for a couple of weeks this time. Already I am tired, but also excited!

Again, if anyone reading this is considering this as a career, read about it in the lives of others here before you begin. I think the biggest part of control needed is the mental aspect. Because you have hours and hours of time to think!

Time now for me to get supper prepared for my wife and a cherished night at home!

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Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

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Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

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