Schneider, Ctl, Superior

Topic 15752 | Page 1

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BlackRicFlair's Comment
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Good evening everyone, been lurking all through school now here foes my first post and my first situation. Just did my ph interview with schneider bulk for southeast regional , they sated around 1500 mi at .39 cpm go to .42 after 6mths with accessory pay around 177 and make around 585 totaling close to 800 a week how true is this and what should i really expect? I have my tanker endorsement, and going to valdosta tomorrow to apply for twic and hazmat fingerprinting. CTL HAS contacted me and said i need my twic and hazmat in hand first or get my receipts and call back, they do have a position open out of atlanta terminal and its .45 cpm i think, and yes i believe ctl is better pay wise and schneider is really at the bottom of the three for me. Moving on, been in contact with superior over the past few weeks and they have been working me and seem to be a very good company, problem is they do have a position available, but they need my final transcript wich the school wont be released until next week and my certificate of completion....big problem my technical school keeps telling me it wont be ready until acouple of weeks, i went yesterday trying to explain to them that i have a job offer and that i really need these items to further my new career, so kinda stuck in a hardbplace and i reeeaaalllly want to get on with superior. SCHNEIDER is ready to put me on a plane, but my last resort. so my main question is what would you guys do in my situation. Momma always said a bird in hand is better than 2 in the bush, but i wanna make sure its the best bird and a good one, so i can eat for a long time if u know what i mean...................The black Rick Flair....wooooooooooo

Oh and whats really the lown down on scneidrr bulk if i have to go that route and there training in PA

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I know my school through a community college wouldn't release our training certificate until we gave them proof we had our CDL in hand. I too needed my certificate quickly so the day I got my actual cdl i scanned and emailed them a copy of my new license and they scanned and emailed my training certificate back to me to forward to my employer. I received the hard copy certificate about 2 weeks later in the mail. Maybe your school will do this for you also to save waiting time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Schneider. .. my best friend lives in atlanta and is home every weekend. She is discouraged from running night which is great for her. I'd hate that. She has only good things to say.

Superior usually pays better but wants a lot more OTR experience. My sorta ex euns regional with them. ..is home every other weekend. Regional to them means mostly the northeast and midwest.... but he has been to Dallas California and oregon... but based in NJ. He does not have a regular dispatcher. Say he gets sent from NJ to Chicago. The Chicago office then routes him back to NJ... even if it is not his home time. NJ then dispatches him to grab a load in NJ and head out somewhere else. But at each 90 he is then dispatched back to his home state. Sometimes he gets frustrated cause he could be 70 miles from home but no hours to get there or notice between loads to stop home.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
BlackRicFlair's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the reply Ladies, Ms. Rainy, do u know if your friwnd is averaging around 1500 miles and is there pay around want i was quoted, close to 800 weekly, up or down and is it consistent. ......so u say discouraged from night driving ...i would love that, i just worried about 1500 miles and trying to.make a living, the superior gig they will hire out of school, everything is going well just need my school info i have cdl in hand with tank, and going for twic and haz tomorrow. What year truck did they give them and whats the farthest north do they drive, i was told virginia by the interviewer. Oh another question Ms. RAINY what training location did she attend , houston or Pa, and whats was to quality fo the hotel they put you in for 30 days, not being picking just dont want to be with a roomate and have to deal with being on the wrong side of town.....wink wink, or not being able to be comfortable at jight when its time to get much needed rest

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm Schneider dry Van. Everything my recruiter promised was true. Been driving for Schneider over 18months.

I'm not sure why you'd train in PA for tanker. I thought that training was in Atlanta. However, one of the reasons I chose Schneider is they don't mess around keeping you training longer than necessary. Translation: I started earning my own money quicker than most companies.

I have only positive things to say about Schneider as a company to work for. I've considered bulk and talked to at least five drivers who all are very satisfied with that division of Schneider. And they all have been doing it over5 years.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BlackRicFlair's Comment
member avatar

I'm Schneider dry Van. Everything my recruiter promised was true. Been driving for Schneider over 18months.

I'm not sure why you'd train in PA for tanker. I thought that training was in Atlanta. However, one of the reasons I chose Schneider is they don't mess around keeping you training longer than necessary. Translation: I started earning my own money quicker than most companies.

I have only positive things to say about Schneider as a company to work for. I've considered bulk and talked to at least five drivers who all are very satisfied with that division of Schneider. And they all have been doing it over5 years.

Thanks steve, at first the recruiter did tell me Atlanta for 18 days, but the interviewer said it would be Pa for tanker and atl for intermodal and dedicated, just never heard ofnsomeone making a living off 1500 miles but if itsnpossible to make 800 gross at only 1500 miles then its okay fr the time being and be off everyweekend and the option to run weekends if i wish, i know being a rookie i have to pay my dues, i wish i already had a 1yr expierience because they have dedicated runs from miller brewing here where im from.....thanks for the info......woooooooooo

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BlackRicFlair's Comment
member avatar

Are there any current schneider bulk drivers on here?

Joshua's Comment
member avatar

Yes

Joshua's Comment
member avatar

I'm currently with Schneider Bulk Division. I've been here for 3 months now. I can tell you that their training is GREAT & very THOROUGH. You will learn ALOT over the course of 2-3 weeks: yes there is a Bulk training center in PA, one in Houston, & I forget where the other one is. But yea $800 gross is VERY possible. I myself have had like 2 or 3 weeks where I grossed $1000. If you put in the work you can make decent money in the Bulk Division.

BlackRicFlair's Comment
member avatar

I'm currently with Schneider Bulk Division. I've been here for 3 months now. I can tell you that their training is GREAT & very THOROUGH. You will learn ALOT over the course of 2-3 weeks: yes there is a Bulk training center in PA, one in Houston, & I forget where the other one is. But yea $800 gross is VERY possible. I myself have had like 2 or 3 weeks where I grossed $1000. If you put in the work you can make decent money in the Bulk Division.

Woooooooo (ric flair voice) Thanks for that insight because i was getting kinda of scared, if u dont mind me asking what is your average miles a week? do you go home every weekend or do you keep running? What year is your truck and did you get to pick your truck or was it already assigned to you. The accessory pay does it really equal to about 30% of your weekly gross? Where do you usually unload and haul for the most part. I know you stated you have been with them for 3 months, do you see yourself staying with them the full year or after? Last ? What made u choose snb out of all the other companies?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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