Profile For Mud Dog

Mud Dog's Info

  • Location:
    Greeneville, TN

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 4 months ago

Mud Dog's Bio

Owner Operator with 20 years experience. (Been driving since Cabovers, payphones, and maps.) Hate what things have become, yet still couldn't imagine doing anything else.

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Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Thinking bout buying a used truck & leasing on somewhere with another driver driving it

Just had my Cat rebuilt 3 weeks ago. Platinum, new oil cooler, turbos, a day harnesses, 4 year warranty, 25k.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Thinking bout buying a used truck & leasing on somewhere with another driver driving it

Then instead of quoting me, why don't you give the man some of your miracle advice. There is no truck on the road being operated at .50 cents a mile...guaranteed!

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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A new Concern hit me today.

Let's put it this way, I don't run that road in the winter time. I detour myself through WY. An extra hundred miles is a low price to pay in my opinion.

rofl-3.gif

This is experience at its finest. Take the high road (80) or the low road (40,93) if at a possible during the snow season. I've seen it snow in July in Colorado. As far as frequency, it's a craps shoot, but if you run out west, it's inevitable that you will have to chain up at some point.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Thinking bout buying a used truck & leasing on somewhere with another driver driving it

In my opinion, you would not be able to run one business and work a full time job simultaneously. When you buy a used truck, you buy someone else's problems. For the first two years of ownership, all of the kinks and quirks will surface. Unless you work on the truck yourself, mechanic labor rates (upwards of $80 hr) will eat you alive. But to answer your questions, general freight pays anywhere between $1 to $2 a mile plus fuel surcharge. Out of this, you would be responsible to pay insurance, driver, fuel, maintenance, federal tax, 2290 tax ($550), base plates ($1800) and possibly more depending on the carrier you sign with. An engine is pushing a rebuild ($15k to $25k) at 750,000 miles and in dire need at one million miles. Figure on driving 150,000 to 200,000 miles a year. Cost to run a truck is upwards of .80 cents per mile, ALL MILES.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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How much do cb shops charge to get your radio dialed in?

Honestly, I wouldn't be all that worried about it right away. The majority of your radios will give you plenty of range to get traffic alerts and such. The biggest factor right off the bat is having good antennas and get them dialed in properly (owners manual should explain it) my Uniden did it with a push of a button and many newer radios do as well.

If you're that concerned with doing it, research a good reputable shop that actually does an upgrade and doesn't just snatch a filter or resistor off the board and tell you they peaked the radio. It will sound louder and does increase the power some but it spreads it across more channels so in reality it actually loses power. It will probably run $75-$100 to have it tuned up properly.

Dint listen to this fellow, he obviously has no clue about CB radios. Out of the box, a CB generally produces 4 watts of output (1 or 2 mIles of range). Peaked and tuned, you'll put out upwards of 35 watts (7-10 miles of range). 50 to 100 bucks for the package. P.S. don't run your antenna like a Lance as some of the morons do. You want to have it pointed forward just enough so's to have the whip stand straight up as you drive into the wind.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Truckers wearing flip-flops: Why all the hate?

Real truck drivers used to be a roughneck, blue collar, working breed that would get greasy and work on their own equipment. Flip flops are seen as being the new lazy class out here like they're on some damn vacation, or working an office 9 to 5 job! Flip flops go with the driving gloves and tire thumper, (which are completely useless in my opinion). US veterans take it personally, as the image of truck drivers is reduced from a respectable, hard working individual, to a lazy steering wheel holder with his feet up on the dash while driving. It's a disgrace what things have become.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Is Anyone Doing Anything About the Shortage of Truck Parking?

Money is just a small factor. Zoning and EPA regulations are the major issue. Truck exhaust, emissions, oil leakage, noise, trash, and not to mention **** bottles, all prevent new facilities. BTW, there is no shortage of parking. There IS a shortage of experienced drivers. Three weeks I've been out on this stint, and not once have I had a problem parking with a nearby restroom. Proper planning, knowledge of the areas, and quality backing skills are the reason why. Today's drivers are fickle about where they park. They HAVE to have the amenities, (shower, restaurant, cable television) . These are all provided by the "Rewards" programs promoted by the major chains. Avoid the major chains. Find the back door truck stops. There is always parking out here if you plan right. Now, 15, 20 years ago, trying to squeeze a 53' trailer into a truck stop built for 45' trailers....that was a challenge.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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Is Anyone Doing Anything About the Shortage of Truck Parking?

I think they should go ahead and build paid lots somehow. I don't know how you set it up. Maybe the states build em, maybe private companies - whatever. But if you could pay $5 and you knew there was always going to be a spot open then that's worth it sometimes. It's annoying that you have to worry about finding parking when you're trying to schedule your day. Sure would be nice to pull off the road at 10:00 pm, cruise right into an open spot, and you're good to go. No hassle.

Another hand in my pocket! I don't think so. We should make money to haul freight, not pay money to haul freight. Sorry, but I disagree with your idea.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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C.B. Radio

I'll give an example of the importance. View the videos of the massive pile-ups this past winter along the roadways on YouTube. Truck after truck after truck come barreling down the interstates and slides into the back end of these pile-ups. I just shake my head and think "if they had a CB on, they would've been aware well in advance to avoid such a situation. Another circumstance I often see is one truck following another. The driver in the rear cannot see any dangers lurking ahead on the shoulder. Suddenly; the lead driver changes lanes to avoid (move over; it's the law) a policeman with a customer on the side of the road. Now the rear driver is stranded and surprised in the right lane. These are real life situations that can be tragic, but at the same time, they are completely avoidable. As for the tuning of a radio, open the squelch and RF gain all the way. Then back off the squelch until there is no static. This blocks out the weak signals and allows only the strong to be heard.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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C.B. Radio

I am merely trying to point out the importance of communication to the new drivers out here. Learn how to use the radio and you will not here all of the garbage.

Posted:  5 years, 3 months ago

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C.B. Radio

Over the years, the CB Radio has become obsolete on the roads. There is a major lack of communication between drivers. A tractor trailer is a machine, operated by a man/woman with many blind spots. Today's drivers do not see the importance of this communication. I hear the same excuses all of the time, "I can't speed", "I don't want to listen to the noise", etc. However; there are too many positive reasons to have communication to validate these excuses. A professional driver should be aware of his/her surroundings at ALL times. A CB allows us to know about upcoming conditions before it's too late. There could be a police officer around a blind curve, a gator in a lane, a strap hanging from your flatbed, a shifting load, a flat tire, snow, ice, stopped traffic ahead. The list goes on and on. 80,000 plus pounds of metal can be difficult to maneuver in a last minute situation. Just a thought.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Engine brakes on 2016 peterbilt 579

It's got to do with parameter settings. Jakes are considered dangerous in slippery conditions. If the Jake comes on and slows the tractor only, there is a chance of jackknifing as the trailer continues to push. If the Jake only operates when brakes are applied evenly around the entire vehicle, there is less of a chance to jack knife. These parameters can be changed with the proper software.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Leasing A Truck: My Journey

Interesting journal. Just curious, what make/model truck? How many miles on it? Engine type? Word of advice? Inspect, inspect, inspect. Every time you stop that truck, look around thoroughly. Catching problems beforehand can easily make the difference between a $500 repair and a $5000 repair. Frayed hoses, oil leaks, air leaks, bent lines, or rubbing wires. Something simple can shut you down on the side of the road instantaneously. Carry tools. Simple tools to air tools. Make sure you are able to avoid the $100 an hour labor charges for minor repairs that you can do yourself in a parking lot. Spare parts. Once you start to gain capital, think about investing in spare parts. Two feet of hose in various sizes, as well as; hose clamps and repair kits. Compression fittings of various sizes for air lines. Extra nuts and bolts of various sizes. Believe me, they will save you at some point. One last note, I noticed you are not including road expenses in your finances. (Or are you?) Keep track of meals, hotels, laundry, etc. Figure ways to cut these costs and you'll see a huge savings. (Fridge, microwave, coffee maker, etc.) Good luck. Any questions, feel free to ask. It's refreshing to see someone with initiative and ambition.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Becoming a owner op?

First off, there is nothing wrong with a person wishing to achieve more in life than being a steering wheel holding drone. There are many benefits and privileges to being an owner operator. However, there is more to owning a truck than just driving. Spending countless hours working on your own vehicle to avoid $100 an hour labor charges, maintenance, permits, fuel estimating, book keeping, etc. As for the first step, DON'T LEASE! Find a dealer that will finance you a truck. The payments you make actually pay off the truck, and with a decent company to lease on to, as well as; good ole fashioned hard work, the title will be in your hand within a hear or two. Do not be discouraged by others. You wish to think for yourself, by all means do it.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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A little advice

Sometimes these schools do offer Scholarships, and Financial Aid. You may want to check on that. If the school you are looking at does not accept these programs, perhaps another, close by, does. It would be worth it. Another way I've heard of, is to go to the local unemployment office and ask if they have a program. I've seen many people put into truck driving simply to get them off of unemployment.

Posted:  5 years, 4 months ago

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Shifting the truck....AAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!!!!!!

1st off, get the tranny out of the truck! No riders! Lol. Seriously; downshifting is essential to diving a truck. Don't just drive the truck young Jedi, feel the truck, be one with the truck. RPM's, MPH, sounds, they all for a symphony to shifting. Once you learn the synchronicity of all these factors, then you will be able to downshift smoothly. (Drop rpm's to 1200, tap on throttle, bump shifter out of gear, Rev to 1500 rpm's, then slide it in.

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