Comments By Mud Dog

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  • Mud Dog
  • Joined:
  • 8 years, 10 months ago
  • Comments:
  • 16

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Posted:  8 years, 9 months ago

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C.B. Radio

Over the years, the CB Radio has become obsolete on the roads. There is a major lack of communication between drivers. A tractor trailer is a machine, operated by a man/woman with many blind spots. Today's drivers do not see the importance of this communication. I hear the same excuses all of the time, "I can't speed", "I don't want to listen to the noise", etc. However; there are too many positive reasons to have communication to validate these excuses. A professional driver should be aware of his/her surroundings at ALL times. A CB allows us to know about upcoming conditions before it's too late. There could be a police officer around a blind curve, a gator in a lane, a strap hanging from your flatbed, a shifting load, a flat tire, snow, ice, stopped traffic ahead. The list goes on and on. 80,000 plus pounds of metal can be difficult to maneuver in a last minute situation. Just a thought.

Posted:  8 years, 10 months ago

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Engine brakes on 2016 peterbilt 579

It's got to do with parameter settings. Jakes are considered dangerous in slippery conditions. If the Jake comes on and slows the tractor only, there is a chance of jackknifing as the trailer continues to push. If the Jake only operates when brakes are applied evenly around the entire vehicle, there is less of a chance to jack knife. These parameters can be changed with the proper software.

Posted:  8 years, 10 months ago

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Leasing A Truck: My Journey

Interesting journal. Just curious, what make/model truck? How many miles on it? Engine type? Word of advice? Inspect, inspect, inspect. Every time you stop that truck, look around thoroughly. Catching problems beforehand can easily make the difference between a $500 repair and a $5000 repair. Frayed hoses, oil leaks, air leaks, bent lines, or rubbing wires. Something simple can shut you down on the side of the road instantaneously. Carry tools. Simple tools to air tools. Make sure you are able to avoid the $100 an hour labor charges for minor repairs that you can do yourself in a parking lot. Spare parts. Once you start to gain capital, think about investing in spare parts. Two feet of hose in various sizes, as well as; hose clamps and repair kits. Compression fittings of various sizes for air lines. Extra nuts and bolts of various sizes. Believe me, they will save you at some point. One last note, I noticed you are not including road expenses in your finances. (Or are you?) Keep track of meals, hotels, laundry, etc. Figure ways to cut these costs and you'll see a huge savings. (Fridge, microwave, coffee maker, etc.) Good luck. Any questions, feel free to ask. It's refreshing to see someone with initiative and ambition.

Posted:  8 years, 10 months ago

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Becoming a owner op?

First off, there is nothing wrong with a person wishing to achieve more in life than being a steering wheel holding drone. There are many benefits and privileges to being an owner operator. However, there is more to owning a truck than just driving. Spending countless hours working on your own vehicle to avoid $100 an hour labor charges, maintenance, permits, fuel estimating, book keeping, etc. As for the first step, DON'T LEASE! Find a dealer that will finance you a truck. The payments you make actually pay off the truck, and with a decent company to lease on to, as well as; good ole fashioned hard work, the title will be in your hand within a hear or two. Do not be discouraged by others. You wish to think for yourself, by all means do it.

Posted:  8 years, 10 months ago

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A little advice

Sometimes these schools do offer Scholarships, and Financial Aid. You may want to check on that. If the school you are looking at does not accept these programs, perhaps another, close by, does. It would be worth it. Another way I've heard of, is to go to the local unemployment office and ask if they have a program. I've seen many people put into truck driving simply to get them off of unemployment.

Posted:  8 years, 10 months ago

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Shifting the truck....AAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!!!!!!

1st off, get the tranny out of the truck! No riders! Lol. Seriously; downshifting is essential to diving a truck. Don't just drive the truck young Jedi, feel the truck, be one with the truck. RPM's, MPH, sounds, they all for a symphony to shifting. Once you learn the synchronicity of all these factors, then you will be able to downshift smoothly. (Drop rpm's to 1200, tap on throttle, bump shifter out of gear, Rev to 1500 rpm's, then slide it in.

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