Profile For Dave Reid

Dave Reid's Info

  • Location:
    Belleville, MI

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:
    Dave Reid On The Web

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 7 months ago

Dave Reid's Bio

drreid1958@gmail.com

I spent my first lifetime in the insurance business, then went into trucking.

I was born in Baltimore and spent my first twenty years in Harford County, Maryland. Then, I moved to Jackson, Michigan...from there to Ann Arbor. I lived in Michigan most of my life, until I was about 57. Then, I livedon the road (in my truck) for a few years. When my parents needed me during their final days I returned to Maryland for a time. Now, I'm back in Michigan to be near my kids/grandkids, and I'm back in the insurance business.

I'm a big fan of the Detroit Tigers, and also the Detroit Red Wings.

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Posted:  3 weeks ago

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CFI or Heyl or Paper Transport as my first job...

"reefer" is actually something of a misnomer. The units supply heating as well as cooling, so if the product needs 40 and it's -10 out, the thing will supply heat.

Most of the loads I hauled that required heat spec'd either 55 degrees or "protect from freezing". Even dry vans can (and do) haul the "protect from freezing" loads in cold weather if they either stay in motion or park at a yard with heated space for trailers.

But when I was with Pride, I hauled a lot of candy that spec'd 55 deg.

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That will vary by person.

I was told that when I was a baby and my mother wanted to shut me up and get me to go to sleep, she put me on the washing machine.

The reefer noise didn't really bother me but I did like it better if I were hauling ice cream or produce and could therefore leave the thing run continuously. With other products, they want it to cycle and I didn't like that so much but it wasn't terrible. For one thing, I used my CPAP thing as a snorkel and buried my head into my sleeping bag and that was enough to cut the racket. Newer reefer units are much quieter than they used to be.

I'd say the reefers on other trucks bothered me more than the one behind me did, and that is going to happen to you at truck stops whether you're pulling one or not. So I would try to park between dry vans or flatbeds and if I had to be next to a reefer I tried to line up such that my bunk wouldn't be too close to their reefer.

This reminds me of something I disliked more than reefers though, and that is trucks without APUs that provide sleeper power by cycling the tractor engine. I did really dislike that which was part of the reason I went IC and got an APU. So that is going to vary by company...you could ask your recruiter about it if that is an issue for you, and current drivers for the companies you're considering.

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Dave, I know you have many years of experience with reefers. If I decide to go with Heyl my biggest concern is noise they make. How bad is it in the night when you try to get some sleep?

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Silly reefer question. What happens if the dispatch states to keep product at 40 degrees, and you are traveling through areas of -10 degrees, is there a chance that the product could freeze? If so, what do you do? I believe Prime uses APU's. I hate parking next to apu's more than reefers. It's like parking next to a lawn mower all night, lol.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

CFI or Heyl or Paper Transport as my first job...

That will vary by person.

I was told that when I was a baby and my mother wanted to shut me up and get me to go to sleep, she put me on the washing machine.

The reefer noise didn't really bother me but I did like it better if I were hauling ice cream or produce and could therefore leave the thing run continuously. With other products, they want it to cycle and I didn't like that so much but it wasn't terrible. For one thing, I used my CPAP thing as a snorkel and buried my head into my sleeping bag and that was enough to cut the racket. Newer reefer units are much quieter than they used to be.

I'd say the reefers on other trucks bothered me more than the one behind me did, and that is going to happen to you at truck stops whether you're pulling one or not. So I would try to park between dry vans or flatbeds and if I had to be next to a reefer I tried to line up such that my bunk wouldn't be too close to their reefer.

This reminds me of something I disliked more than reefers though, and that is trucks without APUs that provide sleeper power by cycling the tractor engine. I did really dislike that which was part of the reason I went IC and got an APU. So that is going to vary by company...you could ask your recruiter about it if that is an issue for you, and current drivers for the companies you're considering.

Dave, I know you have many years of experience with reefers. If I decide to go with Heyl my biggest concern is noise they make. How bad is it in the night when you try to get some sleep?

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Decided on Pride (hopefully) and private CDL school

Hey Vicki, I think you'll be happy with your decision, although you've still got plenty of time to gather info before you have your license. I've put a few other comments in below under some of yours. Dave

if I hate it, I can quit and come home and drive tour buses to the Grand Canyon

Yes but known that the bus company might not value your semi-driving that highly for the experience. Some will, some won't. At a minimum, you'd have to get the "P" endorsement added (not a big deal...but you can't get it driving the semi). For sure you would at least have your CDL and some large vehicle experience. I have driven about every size and type of bus and about every size and type of group of people and it is a world apart from semi driving. Another option for you should you need it is that there are local trucking gigs in NV, or possibly between LV and one or two other cities not too far away. Pride might even have some available now and then. For sure they do in Reno, or at least they did.

2. They have no issue with pets or riders if you want them.

They have a size/weight limit on pets so you might want to check that. OTOH enforcement of it seems to be lighthanded. They have a minimum age for riders and it is higher in the winter so you may want to check that if you have a young kid you're thinking of taking at times.

3. They have a drop yard pretty close to my house. They also run the I15 corridor a lot. She said that besides home time, I might be able to work it out to spend my 10 hour breaks at home from time to time. I like options. Her actual quote was "You just drop the trailer at the yard and bobtail on home for your 10 hours when you can".

Do a great job for your FM and they'll likely help with that. The trainer I had at Pride lived in LV and he did 10+ there 3 or 4 times while I was with him. He dumped me at a casino (with the truck) and his wife picked him up. Regarding the bobtailing home thing, know that Pride is atypical in that....lot of companies will not let you bobtail far and most of them don't all use of DOT's personal conveyance mode to do so. Pride does and they are very flexible about it. This can be huge in my view. Once they even let me drive about 200 miles (round trip) out of route dragging my load with me in order to make a family event. Granted I had requested home time for the event and they had loused that up but I assure you most companies would just say tough luck on that.

4. An inverter for my CPAP is no problem, though I would have to pay to have it installed.

Actually, Pride doesn't charge for installing an inverter or any other accessories you want, but you have to pay for it. They don't provide inverters and don't allow miscellaneous personal ones - they have a specific one that you have to buy (they'll accept an installment arrangement) and then it is yours. Any pile of accessories you want to buy you can give to the shop and they'll install them. When you get a new truck, they'll yank your accessories out of the old truck and put them in the new one. They also have a cool platform thing to help you walk your stuff from truck to truck.

I just ordered my certified birth certificate (don't know where mine is, it's been 10 or so years since I've seen it). I'll take that and renew my passport

It is nice to have a passport but you don't need one for Pride. They don't cross borders. They also don't haul any hazmat. You might want to ask them if they would like you to have the TWIC - I don't remember - if so you could get that while you're doing your other errands. I don't recall if I ever used my TWIC when I was with Pride. What I do recall is that when I did need it at a few customers it was mighty nice having it and got me out of the dang place a lot faster than the guys that had to be escorted everywhere.

Final thing: Like many companies, Pride does not have a lot of female trainers. Maybe you will get lucky and get one but they'll probably ask you if you care and if you're willing to be flexible it will be easier/quicker to get a trainer assignment. The trainer I had [Eric Campbell] would definitely be fine if he is still there training - I'd have no trouble seeing a loved one ride off with him. Otherwise...if they propose a male trainer to you, you could ask a couple of the female employees at HQ for their opinion and I'd encourage you to do so. There is probably at least one female FM and last I knew there were a couple of women in the safety department. One of them is Rachel - if she's still there she would be a great one to ask. Rachel has been with Pride for many years. I think she started as a mechanic, then became a driver, then became a safety/trainer, and still drives part-time one or two weekends a month. She would know all of the trainers.

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Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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CFI or Heyl or Paper Transport as my first job...

Ah - with that tidbit I can help a little more and probably others could chime in as well. Typically the 48 state companies do not run a particular driver in 48 states, especially not if you'll be solo. Most freight is regional and most of the majors will want to put you in a region that works for your hometime desires.

There are exceptions so this is something you can ask your recruiter about.

Most outfits that will run a solo driver cross-country will a) require experience, and b) will likely have largely specific routes.

The opportunities to bounce all around the lower 48 are few and far between. I don't know of any that are open to newbies but maybe someone else does.

Another thing: you're more likely to find some cross country stuff with a reefer outfit than you are with a dry van outfit.

Your most important thing now is to get yourself a year or three of safe driving under your belt. Then you'll be in a better position to find more opportunities.

I had similar desires as you do and found a way to do it by starting with a reefer company that did run me cross country through about 30 states I think and then transitioning to being an IC in a self-dispatch environment. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to truck through 48 states and DC doing that combination, but still, most of the freight was regional and in the self-dispatch environment I chose it was difficult to get from far west to far east and generally unprofitable to try, so I didn't. I had gotten plenty of opportunities to drive the west when I pulled the reefers - that was a CA to NJ type of thing with lots of other variety. In my dry van gig, I ran the eastern 37. It was all fun except the west in the winter....ugh.

Thanks so much Dave for your input on Georgia Pacific dedicated. Looks like I am not ready for that. My preference is dry van OTR 48 states, I would like to see this beautiful country and not only southeast and that's why I put CFI on the top of my list. CFI is also the one that has overall best reviews from current and ex employees.

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If I've gotta pick from the three you offer I would go with CFI. They'll give you great support to start your career.

Nothing wrong with the rest but I would suggest that doing a dedicated thing for Georgia Pacific could be a tough way to start. I hauled a bunch of loads for them and I'm glad I had some time under my belt before I did so.

Now for a little unsolicited advice: it's a big world out there. You can likely thrive at most any company that hires new drivers. There are many training diaries and many company profiles etc. on this site. The company that works best for you is likely the one that can offer you the type of cargo you want to pull, the sort of home time arrangement you need, and can meet any other requirements specific to your needs.

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My first post here. I love reading on this forum, looking for advice now. Got my Class A CDL, X, T and P endorsements, tomorrow is my last day at school, need to make big decision who to start career with. I have narrowed my selection to these three: CFI, Heyl (Zephyrhills, FL) and Paper Transport (PTI-Dedicated, Southeast, main customer Georgia Pacific). My main goal for the first year is to operate safe equipment, get trained properly and get fair treatment. I will think about money my second year. Your input will greatly be appreciated. Thanks so much.

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Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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CFI or Heyl or Paper Transport as my first job...

If I've gotta pick from the three you offer I would go with CFI. They'll give you great support to start your career.

Nothing wrong with the rest but I would suggest that doing a dedicated thing for Georgia Pacific could be a tough way to start. I hauled a bunch of loads for them and I'm glad I had some time under my belt before I did so.

Now for a little unsolicited advice: it's a big world out there. You can likely thrive at most any company that hires new drivers. There are many training diaries and many company profiles etc. on this site. The company that works best for you is likely the one that can offer you the type of cargo you want to pull, the sort of home time arrangement you need, and can meet any other requirements specific to your needs.

My first post here. I love reading on this forum, looking for advice now. Got my Class A CDL, X, T and P endorsements, tomorrow is my last day at school, need to make big decision who to start career with. I have narrowed my selection to these three: CFI, Heyl (Zephyrhills, FL) and Paper Transport (PTI-Dedicated, Southeast, main customer Georgia Pacific). My main goal for the first year is to operate safe equipment, get trained properly and get fair treatment. I will think about money my second year. Your input will greatly be appreciated. Thanks so much.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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What to Wear - Meet my mentor in about a week(ish?)

You'll get various opinions on things but here is my two cents:

No groceries. Some jerky and protein bars or something like that in case you need them to tide you over; otherwise plan on picking up grub along the way until you've got your own truck. A fairly small percentage of trainers may offer you some space in their fridge or cooler; if so you could use a little of it but there isn't much to begin with and it is theirs.

Don't bring anything you can't fit into your bunk with you because in most cases that is where it will be. A sleeping bag & pillow, a change of pants/shirt or two, a week of underwear/socks, and a flexible jacket are what you'll likely need. Less is more except in Las Vegas.

If there is any chance you're going to have to chain up, then you'll need gear for that so ask your company. You don't really have room for that stuff so only bring it if you must but that's where you'd have to have a bunch of appropriate cold weather crap. Otherwise, you can get by with being a little chilly for a few minutes here and there.

Flashlight and multitool; don't go anywhere without 'em.

Your company may have a list of suggested items to bring to orientation and there are plenty of them on this site.

It'll be Feb and possibly into March while I'm teamed up with a mentor and I've nothing to wear. Oh, that should have been the title...

I know it'll be cold in most places, I used to live up there. Alas, FL stores don't carry much for cold weather even in the fall, so I'm looking at ordering in. Keeping those Amazon trucks rolling!

Seriously, I know I'm invading another man's home so-to-speak and don't want to overpack. can't know how much room I'll have for my own stuff or even what that should be. I have uninsulated work boots, a couple hoodies and some flannels for cold weather. I'm thinking I'd like some kind of bed roll since PAM trains as a team and I'll be sharing the bunk. Should I order in some insulated bibs and a nice forescent coat? Perhaps a foot locker? Ok, never mind the locker, but those battery powered socks are staying on the list. Florida blood here.

I just know I need to get this done quickly or it'll arrive after I leave.

So my questions are: What to get? What are the best bedroll ideas? Should I pack groceries (without ever seeing the inside of the truck)? I reckon that last can be done after talking to the mentor guy.

Ideas would help, and if you've trained please give me your "don't do it" list. I hate being on that list.

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Wanting to talk with drivers at Pride Transport SLC Utah

Yes

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I drove for Pride in 2017 and 2018. I found them to be an excellent company to work with and for. I really cannot think of anything that they could do better with the exception of their road training is a typical team driving setup but they aren't likely to change that due to the expense. I doubt you could find a better management team anywhere. As has been posted in this thread, I wrote up a bit about the orientation/training previously.

I start orientation with Pride on 15 feb 2021. I would like to hear from Pride drivers about it all.

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Mr. Reid thank you for the input. You confirmed what I have mostly found researching the web for 3rd party confirmation. If I may ask you this...would you go back to them today if your circumstances allowed?

Posted:  3 weeks, 1 day ago

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Career-ending accident; don't let this be you.

Vicki, Old School, Rob, Anne, Steve, & Pete (and anyone else who read and thought kind thoughts and/or learned something of use):

Thank you for your kind words and encouragement. I appreciate it.

Please be safe out there.

Dave

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Wanting to talk with drivers at Pride Transport SLC Utah

Vicki, in the case of Pride, I think you'll find that you can trust what the recruiters tell you to be accurate. I don't know whether this is still the case or not but when I was there the director of recruiting was also in charge of orientation - that is a sign of the confidence they have in what they promise - another is that the recruiting unit sits right in the open in an area accessible to drivers and they have no way to hide. They aren't going to want to lie to people. Another thing is that with Pride there really isn't anything to lie about. They just do everything well. I won't recite details again, they're in my prior training wrap-up and details can change from time to time. But Pride is truly a driver's company. The founder was a trucker that decided to grow and he stayed. When I was there he was still working although his son had been named president. Founder Jeff was actually still driving part-time, still came out and talked to drivers, and wanted to be known as the trucker that he was. He pulled into work every day driving a simple pickup truck and arrived early in the am. On my one-year anniversary with the company, he called me to thank me for driving with Pride. I was told that he calls every driver every year on their anniversary. If it weren't for my need to control my schedule more as I described, I'd have stayed there as long as possible.

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I drove for Pride in 2017 and 2018. I found them to be an excellent company to work with and for. I really cannot think of anything that they could do better with the exception of their road training is a typical team driving setup but they aren't likely to change that due to the expense. I doubt you could find a better management team anywhere. As has been posted in this thread, I wrote up a bit about the orientation/training previously.

I start orientation with Pride on 15 feb 2021. I would like to hear from Pride drivers about it all.

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So glad to hear this. I just got off the phone with one of their recruiters and was highly impressed. I know recruiters say what they need to, but this person seemed pretty upfront and honest, even when she said things that I didn't want to hear. I do think it will be my company of choice when I get started.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Career-ending accident; don't let this be you.

There is a saying that no one is so totally useless that they cannot at least serve as a bad example. In that spirit, I will share my accident details here. Maybe someone else will not be as dumb as I.

My youngest daughter died suddenly at the age of 30. I should have taken time off to process this, but I kept on trucking. My sister called to tell me that our mother was dying, and I needed to come to see her (in Maryland). I should have parked my truck, gotten on an airplane, and gone straight there. Instead, not wanting to lose so much money, I kept on trucking. I was a self-dispatching IC at the time. So, I found a trip taking me from wherever I was to Houston where I saw a trip to Pennsylvania with a ton of flexibility on delivery date and booked those.

When I got to the pickup near Houston, the place was a cluster and then I had to wait about 4 hours for a door…. burning up my planned drive time. Finally, I was loaded. I was not permitted on the dock nor permitted to see the load until after pulling away. When I did see the load, I was dismayed to find that they had run two rows of heavy bales of some fibrous stuff down the middle of the trailer nearly to the doors, leaving large spaces of nothing on both sides. I did not like the looks of that at all. I should have gone back and told them I was not pulling it unless they fixed the obvious problem. If they refused, I should have refused the load, found someplace to park my truck, headed to the airport, and flown to Baltimore. But I was tired, frustrated, unwilling to lose the money, etc. I rationalized my decision with the thought that these people must know what they are doing since they do nothing but this all day every day. I decided I would be sure to take extra care at corners and ramps, and I hit the road.

I made it to Maryland and parked. My sister picked me up and I got to my mother’s hospital room on a Saturday. Thankfully, I was able to spend the last few hours she was conscious with her and we had a good chat. I stayed Sunday also, but my mom did not wake up again. I should have asked the company to send someone for the load and taken time off to process. But I pressed on, not wanting to lose the $. Sunday night my sister dropped my back at the truck and Monday am early I hit the road. I needed fuel and had planned to stop at a TA just a bit up the road. I had pretty much forgotten about the cargo and the way it was placed in the trailer. I could not have checked on it anyway as it was sealed.

I made the first ramp to get from I95 to a state highway the TA is on and was pulling onto the highway when suddenly, I was flipped over with my left arm dragging on the road, smashed glass all over the place and generally not having a good time. Some rescue people showed up and extracted me through the windshield and took me to the hospital. While I was in surgery a policeman came by and dropped me off a ticket for losing control of the truck. That same afternoon, without any investigation, the company (SNI) informed me that my contract was terminated. The insurance company totaled the 18-month-old truck. A lot of my stuff was lost but my wonderful brother-in-law recovered a lot of the items from the wreckage.

When I could, I viewed the dashcam video. I was going 24mph and almost totally straight when the truck flipped. My hypothesis is that on each ramp from Houston to Baltimore the cargo inched a tad to the left (most ramps being clockwise curves), and then the very last ramp was the last straw with the bales of stuff probably all the way up against the left sidewall, and all that weight just pulled the whole rig over (I had tipped the scales at 79,860).

I did research on the various causes of rollovers. Of course, the #1 cause is driver error; I do not blame the cop for issuing a ticket…he rolls up on flipped-over truck naturally he is going to assume that driver error was the cause. Causes could be excess speed on curve/turn, swerve, improper weight balance front-rear, bad tires, improper inflation, or improperly secured cargo. All ten of my tractor tires were nearly brand-new Michelins. I had the lug nuts retorqued and had a receipt for that. I had inflation checked at a shop a few days prior and had a receipt for that. I had balanced the load properly and had a scale ticket showing that. I was only going 24mph and not even still in a curve when I flipped and 2 dashcam videos showing that. There was a witness who could attest that I had not swerved or anything as well. I presented all this to the court and they immediately dismissed the traffic citation.

I filled an appeal with Schneider but was told that even if all the above are true, I had a chance to inspect the load and took it so if a cargo shift was the problem that was my fault anyway. And maybe they are right about that.

I do not know whether I could get the company’s ruling of preventable overturned at the federal level if I mounted a big challenge there or not, but I did not try. I had the death of my daughter, my mother, and then my father all in rapid order and various other issues and just gave up on driving. I did not really feel much like driving after the rollover anyway, although as more time goes by, I really miss being out there; I did love trucking. What is the lesson in all of this? I guess there are a few; I will let you take from it what you will.

I do miss trucking.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Wanting to talk with drivers at Pride Transport SLC Utah

I drove for Pride in 2017 and 2018. I found them to be an excellent company to work with and for. I really cannot think of anything that they could do better with the exception of their road training is a typical team driving setup but they aren't likely to change that due to the expense. I doubt you could find a better management team anywhere. As has been posted in this thread, I wrote up a bit about the orientation/training previously.

I start orientation with Pride on 15 feb 2021. I would like to hear from Pride drivers about it all.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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I hate snow

The correct spelling is sNOw, btw.

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Stuck in the Pittston holiday inn hotel, my instructor was planning on me testing out this coming weekend but looks like Mother Nature had other plans, hopefully the pad will be clear. Need a lot of backing practice, I did take my first load with him on Thursday. I have a whopping 385 miles driving now lol. But loving every minute at prime. I can’t believe the will pay me to do this.

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Where are they now?

Sorry to have disappeared on you, great people. Momcat tracked me down and let me know that someone was asking about me.

I had a career-ending accident about a year ago and a lot of other bad things occurred in my personal life around the same time and after, so I went awol.

I had a CDL for about 25 years. Most of that time it was a bus CDL and most of that time I drove just part-time as I got into management and ownership of a local company hauling biological cargo. One of the things I liked most about the job was providing training and mentorship of various kinds depending upon the need. Even after I became president of the firm I continued to do the large vehicle training personally, or at the very least the check-rides.

My firm broke apart after Uber/Lyft killed the taxi business, the 2009 recession permanently reduced exec-trans business, and the local city bus company decided to internalize the paratransit operation that we had performed via contract with them for 30 years. I also was kicked out of the house/divorced around that same time so I decided to chuck normal life for a time and see the world via tractor-trailer.

I was fortunate to be hired by Pride Transport Inc (of SLC) pulling reefers. I enjoyed the work immensely and found Pride to be a fantastic company. The only thing I didn't like, really, was the rather horrendous schedule of a reefer puller. I also needed more income than possible to earn as a driver and between that and my love of training/mentoring, I determined to become a trainer as quickly as possible. So, I first became what y'all here call a Top Tier Driver. I assure you that if you ask my fleet manager or others there at Pride they would back my self-praise up on that score.

I was approved to become a trainer very quickly. Yes, I realize that in Utopia a driver would be OTR for 5-10 years before such consideration, but in the real world it takes a year or three or in my case, I made it in about 9 months.

I did some yard training when I was passing through SLC, helping drivers who'd otherwise passed road training but couldn't back up. I think all companies should offer this help but I know that they don't. I even had a personal experience with it when the first company I road trained with kicked me to the curb because I hadn't learned to back (and had been given zero chances to do so during road training - ridiculous). Anyway, I helped several drivers get into a truck after spending a few hours with them. I also got a couple of drivers into trucks that needed a week or two of additional training. That was very rewarding. I also got two FNGs. I did not have good luck with either of those. One of them thought that she knew everything and wouldn't accept any instruction whatsoever from me. I finally gave up and had her terminated. The other one - well I have no clue how he got through CDL school/state licensing. He was afraid of his shadow. On his first day out, he wouldn't go over 40mph on the expressway. We worked on that rofl-2.gif He eventually made it to Pride's "Phase 2" training, during which he was to drive full shifts while I slept and vice-versa. This proved to be highly problematic. I'm not sure how the many companies that do things this way ever succeed because the trainers just can't get enough sleep. We had a lot of problems with this but we worked through most of them. However, one day after his shift he informed me that he didn't want to drive anymore - he had gotten scared of something during his shift and didn't want to discuss much...he just quit. So, I was about 6 for 6 in the yard training, 2 for 2 in the remedial training, and 0 for 2 in the FNG training. Plus I discovered that I would never get enough sleep, and would be routinely put in fear of my life sitting next to certain folks - twice I thought I was dead for sure but the hand of God apparently lifted us out of trouble.

Another problem had cropped up - I needed more schedule flexibility than Pride could provide as I needed to be able to overnight at three specific locations in 3 different states somewhat regularly and that couldn't be done - certainly not as a trainer but not even as a regular driver.

So I looked for a suitable alternative and found one. I became an IC leased to Schneider, acquiring a truck through Schneider Finance. It worked out very well, really. My income was about the same as it could have been as a trainer for Pride (about 90k after expenses, insurance, and SE tax, etc.). However I got a good night's sleep every night, no one was trying to kill me, and best of all I could schedule my trips such that I could overnight and sometimes more (under load) at all the places I wanted to. It really was terrific.

Then I had a career-ending accident. I will make a separate post about that.

My first lifetime was in the insurance business. After recovering from the accident and other things, I am back to that, and back to living in Michigan.

I wish you all the very best. I might stop by and toss my two cents in on something now and then. I'll put my email address in my profile in case anyone wants to contact me about anything.

I

Dave Reid?

Posted:  3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Anyone else stuck in Wyoming?

I was stuck in Wyoming several times and spent a year there one weekend. After that I decided to stay away, at least in the winter.

Anyone else stuck in Wyoming due to the rolling road closures? Been here since 0130 this morning and it seems it might be awhile. The only updates giving so far was the estimate time for it to reopen has increased, multiple times now.

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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So much info on here! :) Which way to my Class A?

While I realize that the amount of (great) information on this site may seem overwhelming, the truth is that there are no shortcuts....no one can distill all you could know into a couple of paragraphs. I highly recommend that you take the time to read it all.....you'll be amazed at what can be learned here.

Hello to everyone willing to give advice!

I have been driving a class B fuel truck for almost 3 years. Pulling a fuel hose to fuel a truck or a fill pipe on house has gotten old and I am looking to do more. My ultimate goal would be to drive transport tanker but not sure how to get there. Obviously I need my Class A license and experience. Do I go with prime, which has a tanker division? Can I get a tanker trainer or am I going to have to start with a reefer anyway? Do I go with Roehl without a tanker division but is more local for me? I know I can't just get in a truck and drive as my experience is not with a combo, so the time I have to put in for paid CDL training is no bother to me. Even in the 3 years i have been with my current company, I am learning something new everyday. I am not questioning if this is something that I want to do, it's for sure. Just not sure which route to take. I have not had a problem getting accepted anywhere as I have a good MVR, hazmat/tanker endorsements, and some schooling/experience. ANY advice ANYONE can give me on here would be super awesome, plus I wouldn't mind getting to know some of you as I will be on the road as well and it seems there is alot of you that have great helpful trucker advice. Thank You!

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Why cant I consistently do the backing maneuvers.

What's happening is that you are new - your results are typical, as you've seen with fellow students.

It gets much easier with time and experience - lots of it!

It's just crazy! I'm at Crowder and one day I am nailing the backing and as the day goes along it just gets worse. What the heck! I watch this and hear the same complaints from fellow students. What is happening???

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Tips For New OTR Trucker With A Family

ROEHL has plenty of regional opportunities, depending on where you live.

Hello everyone! I have been addicted to this site since I found and used the High Road Training program, and I have to say, everyone on here is amazing!!

With that said and out of the way, let me tell you my situation, and what I am looking for.

I have seen/heard a lot of you say that TOE with a family is a bad idea, and also read a few topics in the site about that issue, so I am fully aware of what I am getting in to, and the fact that most think it is a horrible idea to do OTR with a family at home. I assure you, my wife is a very strong, independent, and loyal woman who supports this decision 100%!! I made absolutely sure she was ok with it before I even signed up for this life.

So, the ultimate goal I am trying to accomplish with this post is to get feedback from drivers who have done the OTR route with a family at home (wife and kids) and gather any tips and info to help make the transition as easy on everyone as possible!!

I leave exactly one week from today to start the GYCDL program through Roehl. I plan on staying with them until I get my 120,000 miles in, starting off as a flatbed driver, for at least the first 6 months, then can switch fleets if I want, as stated in my contract. I plan on using either FaceTime or Skype to be able to talk to my family as much as I am able to, without interfering with my training and my job, especially for that crucial first year. After I have my miles in with Roehl, I plan on going regional or even local. So I am expecting to be OTR for about 15 to 18 months, until I hit that 120,000 Mile mark.

So, please, any tips to help my family and me stay in touch and keep close through all of this is GREATLY appreciated, and thank you all for you feedback, thought, and opinions in advance!! Also, any more questions about my situation are welcome, especially if they will help with any advice!!

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Warnings vs. Tickets - NEVER ACCEPT A WARNING!?!

A warning won't go on your PSP - UNLESS the officer also does an inspection and puts the reason for the stop on the inspection report. The reason some (frequently company safety dept folks) give the advice to ask for the ticket instead is that you could try to fight the ticket, and if successful, you could petition to have the violation removed from the PSP and the company's corresponding record. If the officer gives a warning for the violation, there's nothing to dispute and both you and your carrier are stuck with the points for three years.

Got this from instructor in yard today...

He said he was stopped for speeding in IN. The LEO said he was giving him a warning. Hank was confident he was going 55 or less where the speed limit dropped. LEO said "You don't understand... I'm giving you a warning!" Hank insisted he wasn't speeding and added "I can fight a ticket. I can't fight a warning!"

It took him 3 trips to court. When he asked for the in-car video he knew they shoot, Keo said he didn't have anything. When he said "Well, I have some! " - (Veriha has forward and driver-facing DriveCams in all Power Units), the Judge viewed it and dismissed the case!

My take-away - NEVER accept a warning (as it goes on our DAC and can't be removed).

Anyone?

rofl-3.gif

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Northeast

I spent a year one March day in Wyoming.

Wait til u see -40 in WY or MT

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Prepaid legal services/insurance plan

I would keep the money. Drive safely and legally - chances are you'll never need the legal help. If you do end up receiving a citation, then find a local attorney (near the jurisdiction where the ticket was issued) that does traffic violations AND has experience with the transportation industry....pay them.

Anybody have one? From my understanding they take a few bucks a week and if/when you need an attorney they take care of finding some in the area the litigation will take place. If you have one what are the pros and cons?

I would think from a long term financial standpoint it's better to put that money into a savings account and use it for that purpose if/when you need it but just looking for opinions. I was quite surprised to see what attorneys are charging.

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