Profile For Dave Reid

Dave Reid's Info

  • Location:
    Baltimore, MD

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 years, 3 months ago

Dave Reid's Bio

My first career was in the insurance business...did a 20 year hitch. After getting burned out with that, I drove a taxi for 3 years, then was hired to be a manager with the company...ultimatedly I became president, coo, and a partner in the company that owned about 100 vehicles - taxicabs, limousines, paratransit vans, small buses, etc. I also obtained my class B CDL around 2004, and drove various buses and so forth part time.

The business got into financial troubles...loss of the major paratransit contract and the uber/lyft cancer. So, I upgraded the CDL to a Class A and became a trucker. I wanted to get away from it all, so to speak.

I was with Roehl for a minute but had a family issue to help with so I locally drove limo coaches, buses, and motorcoaches for a year or so, then got back to OTR with Pride Transport pulling reefers. I became a trainer for Pride and worked with a few students. Now, I'm an O/O leased to Schneider and I'm loving it.

I don't really live anywhere, so I can go wherever the wind blows.

I enjoy taking a day off now and then, staying at the home of a relative or friend. Now and then, I get a motel room.

I list my city as Baltimore since something needs to go in that box, but I don't really have a city right now and don't expect to for quite some time. I am saving my $ for retirement.

I was born in Baltimore and spent my first twenty years in Harford County, Maryland. Then, I moved to Jackson, Michigan...from there to Ann Arbor. I lived in Michigan most of my life, until I was about 57. Now, I live on the road, and take my time off in various locations where my friends and relatives live.

I'm a big fan of the Detroit Tigers, and also the Detroit Red Wings.

Dave Reid's Photo Gallery

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Posted:  1 week, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Wash out

I almost started to do that in NJ, as I missed my turn and this posted sign said the Bridge was 13'2, I started to slow down but I seen a few other trucks to under it. So I decided to give it a go, I still had my head low looking up to make sure I would clear it rofl-1.gif

Yeah, I always duck. rofl-1.gif

Posted:  1 week, 4 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

I'm always just scratching my head when drivers talk about using load locks on lightweight dry van trailers but pulling the walls in with straps first. What's the point of using both when one (straps) will do just fine.

IDK but we NEVER use load locks and are specifically told not to. Straps only and our company will give us as many as we need or want. We don't have to buy anything like that.

Susan, since I switched to dry van about five months ago, I've yet to use bars on a load. But I asked the company how to do so if necessary and they told me, so I was able to answer the question. The reason one would use them AND straps would be the rare case where a product had to be secured and/or a shipper required it, but the straps couldn't be used alone because of the way the pallets were positioned.

Posted:  1 week, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

I think we might be talking about different pieces of equipment Dave

It sounds like you're using the ones that actually fit in the slots that the the load straps also go in?

All I have are the ones with the rubber feet on either end, and I don't think you could wedge the walls apart enough by hand with those to risk anything

Nope, we're taking the same thing. Those bars you're using with the rubber feet on the end have a bit of a ratcheting mechanism to put pressure against the walls so that they can provide actual securement. You can certainly crank them hard enough against the walls to bust 'em if you want to.

Posted:  1 week, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Seeking Advice About Backing

I agree with every word of Brett's below.

The thing I found most frustrating about trying to learn during those critical first few months are all the turkeys out here that scoff at the new drivers, ridicule them, pressure them, and have no patience with them. I'd guess that issue is a large contributor to accidents and early exits from the business.

When I was a trainer, I even had a couple of jerks make fun of a student one time when I had set up some cones at the back of large, nearly empty lot in the middle of nowhere Wyoming.

New drivers: try to ignore those jerks and whatever you do don't let them pressure you into rushing or failing to GOAL.

Everyone: let's all be nice out here.

Yeah, I agree with G-Town. Just practice a little on the pad for a few days if they'll let you, then get out there solo and figure the rest out.

No one in the history of trucking has ever been good at backing when they went solo. Backing is something you learn with a ton of repetition. There is no "secret" to it or much of anything that can be taught. You watch how a certain maneuver is done, you talk it over for a few minutes, then you spend the next 6 months trying to do it yourself until you become pretty good at it.

It's kind of like throwing a baseball. You just throw it 1,000 times and by then you'll be pretty good at it. There isn't much anyone can do for you.

We've watched tons and tons of drivers either quit driving altogether or nearly put themselves in an asylum because they were terrible at backing in the beginning. Unfortunately that's just how it is for everyone. It would be incredibly expensive to just have people sit in a yard practicing all day, every day for months until they were good at it. So you go out there on the road and practice every chance you get. When you get in a tough spot, it's probably just going to take you a while and it'll be pretty embarrassing. Oh well! That's just how it goes.

Just get back there and get a little practice on the pad. Then tell em you'll go solo and figure the rest out.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Load bars put in tightly enough to really hold can blow out the walls of light dry vans. Put the strap in first and you brace the walls so that they can take the stress of the bar.

I'm new with dry vans so I asked an expert at Schneider and this is how I was instructed.

Fortunately I've only had to do this once in almost five months.

In my former reefer days, we had to put two load bars in almost all the time...three for egg loads. I'd never seen these dang ratchet straps until I went to Schneider.

Sorry, I'm not following. I know you can't really use a load bar on its own because the dry van walls are too flexible on their own, but not getting why you put the strap up first, then the bar

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

View Topic:

O. The places trucking can take you.

When I was a reefer puller I went to the cold storage caves a couple of times. Mighty tight, but workable. Once I asked the yard guy for help.

One special occasion I never hope to repeat: I had some refused product (candy) and was sent to an industrial park that was for some weird reason entirely underground. My spot was at the far end of the joint...very difficult to get to without banging something...and when I arrived I was dismayed to find the place on the right hand side of the little path. They told me to back into their dock which was flanked by a rock wall. I told them I couldn't back in there. They said I had to. I said just open the door and I'll carry the stuff over and hoist it up there. But then I realized I was at a dead end and had no way out but to blindside along the rock and back in there. It didn't really look like the truck could even fit around the required arc. Other guys waiting behind me all had little trucks. Anyway, I finally got in there after a zillion GOALs. I sure hope to see that place again never.

The image didn't come up so I'll re-post it: Brett can probably edit this later.

0398486001540640596.jpg

There are various "cold" storage warehouses across the country set in caves. As a flatbedder I don't get to visit them, but would sure love to.

Posted:  2 weeks, 4 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Other way around

Is that largely to keep from... sort of cranking the walls too tight?

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Schneider "Zero (mishap) Tolerance" - Really?

At this point in my training and research I believe I have the wisdom of Socrates... . . I know that I do not know!

In several months or so, you may be surprised at how much MORE you do not know. At least that is the way it's been for me.

Stick with this forum Sir, you'll learn something new every day, for years. Without this forum, I'd likely have failed at this line of work long ago.

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

For added safety, just put the straps in first

I don't have to do it often, but I'll usually wedge the bars up first, then take a load strap and sort of cinch the walls back together. No one really walked me through any of that so I figured it out myself, it's been working so far.

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Duffle bag came in

thank-you.gif

Dave,

Your last reply had me chuckling.

Chris

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Am I ever gonna getthis backing?

Sorry, apparently I misunderstood the first part of your original post.

The weird part is I’ve never had a problem with straight line.

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Yes, reefer walls are typically much stronger than dry van walls. Reefer walls can take the outward pressure from the load bars.

Is there much difference between dry van and reefer on this topic?

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Yeah, typical dry van walls aren't very strong. Load bars are not used often, but if you need them for a specific situation you have to first pull the walls in some by ratcheting straps, then apply the bars cranking them out using the inward pressure from the straps to offset the outward pressure of the bars. Do it right and you can brace the cargo without damaging the trailer.

Hey Dave, you mentioned not cranking things out so far as to blast out the trailer walls and I was wondering if you can elaborate on that?

Posted:  2 weeks, 5 days ago

View Topic:

Local job for newbie

Most drivers will recommend that you not consider local work without at least a year experience. Local usually involves a lot of deliveries in difficult places and constant difficult traffic. Most carriers won't hire new drivers for such work since they know it isn't likely to work out.

Schneider, among others, can likely offer a regional gig that could get you through home often in your area.

If you insist on local work right off the bat, you might try the food delivery outfits. Some of them are so desperate to fill their lousy jobs that they'll try to train a newbie.

Hi, I was wondering if anybody out there knows of some good local companies in the Northern Illinois area that hires new drivers. I have talked with Schneider, but my wife and I would be happier if I could start off my career while remaining at home. I realize that’s not always an option for the new driver, but I thought I would check. Thanks.

Posted:  2 weeks, 6 days ago

View Topic:

Duffle bag came in

It was a joke, fcol. Once again I learn that I'm not as funny as I think I am.

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Get rid of the q-tips, they take up too much room

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Towels, hand towels, soap, shampoo, wipes, deodorant, mouthwash, toothpaste, toothbrush, floss, cough drops, sanitizer, Bengay, Band-Aids, aspirin, Tylenol, Q-tips, ear plugs, eyemask, melatonin, hat, gloves, neck gaiter, relevant documents, reading material, Tums, Kleenex, Atlas, Truck Stop guide, quarter bag for laundry, markers, pens, highlighter, pencil, sunglasses, flashlight, I still need boots

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? I love my q-tips. I’d get rid of the towels, truck stop guide (trucker path), reading material (kindle app), neck gaiter, and half the writing instruments before giving up the q-tips. 😁

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Securing Dry Van Load - Question

Those Frito loads can't be secured...just forget it. if the boxes fall, they'll pick 'em up

if you have a load you're really concerned about that is stacked such that the load covers up the strap attachment points, you could put two or three straps in the first set of attachment points that can be accessed, then put load bars behind the cargo...just be careful not to crank 'em out so far that you blast the trailer apart, and whatever you do, have those straps secured first....otherwise you'll have to explain why you blew the walls off the trailer.

Certain cargo needs to be secured with blocks nailed to the floor...if that is the case, the shipper should normally do that.

I was hauling a load from Frito-Lay's, the boxes was not on pallets, just stacked from floor-to-ceiling, it was almost all the way to the back, it was one row of boxes from being to the door.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

TSA Precheck (w/ Global Entry) vs TSA background check for HAZMAT

Yes.

If you already have TSA Precheck (w/ Global entry as I do), do you still have to go through the background check again (having worked for the federal and state government, I'm going with a 'yes') as part of the process to obtain your HM endorsement?

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Duffle bag came in

Get rid of the q-tips, they take up too much room

Towels, hand towels, soap, shampoo, wipes, deodorant, mouthwash, toothpaste, toothbrush, floss, cough drops, sanitizer, Bengay, Band-Aids, aspirin, Tylenol, Q-tips, ear plugs, eyemask, melatonin, hat, gloves, neck gaiter, relevant documents, reading material, Tums, Kleenex, Atlas, Truck Stop guide, quarter bag for laundry, markers, pens, highlighter, pencil, sunglasses, flashlight, I still need boots

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Am I ever gonna getthis backing?

Donna, your backing into a spot skills will come with time/practice. It can take six to twelve months for it to click...but you can speed the process up by taking advantage of any spare time you can find mid day when at a large truck stop....just find an area where no one is around and practice practice practice. You could buy some cheap small cones to set up both to mark the spot you're aiming at and to alert others that you're practicing there.

But...you need to learn to straight line back right now! Easy way is to think of this as you back: look for, and turn toward, the trailer tires. When you turn, just turn a little and quickly return the steering wheel to the straight position. Not sure if the wheel is straight? Look at the steer tires. Then check your mirrors again....and look for, and turn toward, the trailer tires. You'll be straight line backing in minutes.

Getting very near my 30,000 miles of tnt training and still can not back. Obviously I don’t know what straight is . My trainer keeps telling me to get my truck straight with my trailer. I’m getting totally frustrated.

Posted:  3 weeks ago

View Topic:

Anyone around Drive for Pride Transport

I drove for Pride for over a year and trained for them the last few months I was there. Fabulous company....no negatives apart from those associated with reefer work which is all that they do. (They used to have a small flatbed program also, but no longer do).

They have 500+ trucks operating out of a single terminal in SLC plus a dozen or so drop yards.

Pride will give you all the miles you can run, consistently. Excellent benefits program. Fairness in all dealings. No lies, no BS. Excellent, well-maintained new equipment. Air ride trailers, replaced at 5 years. Mostly Freightliners, some Peterbilts and Western Stars, replaced at 4 years. No APUs last I knew but were considering them. They don't regulate idling (apart from a park smart system) but have a mpg incentive program that requires minimal idling to qualify. They pay daily upon completion of each trip assuming that you Transflo it. Long average length of haul....lots of coast to coast runs.

I highly recommend Pride Transport, if their freight, service areas, and home time programs work for you.

If you have any specific questions that I didn't answer, post 'em.

Looking for some answered on pride

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