Comments By Shiva

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  • Shiva
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Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Trucker gets fired for speaking to USA TODAY

Https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/07/10/morgan-southern-fires-trucker-who-spoke-20-hour-workdays/103498144/

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Is it really that bad?

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For me it's all about outlook bud, your dad may have had reasons that made him hate the job such as being away from his wife and you and the rest of the family and as a family oriented man myself I agree with him a little in that regard however there are good days and bad days in trucking and just starting out I've had my share of slightly crappy days mainly because I've been away from home for 2 and a half months and not by choice yesterday was a rough day for me but at the end of the day as things started to turn around I said I love my life, i love this job for me it's a passion right now I love to drive and I feel that in order to really suceede here you need both to be a good hard worker and have a love of driving, to me no, it's tough being away from my family in a space smaller then a jail cell and surrounded by nothing but people I don't know from a hole in the wall, it's tough but I do not regret any of it hope that helped and I also hope I got my point across there, best of luck bud

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Thanks John, besides a few out of state trips he was always local and home almost every night. I think the costs, breakdowns and regulations is what gets to him.

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"Bad" is a completely subjective word.

If you're a highly extroverted people person, then you might think the long hours alone in the truck are bad.

If you have a family at home, especially one with young children, then you might think the weeks away from home are bad.

If you prefer constant feedback from your superiors on your job performance, or frequent instructions and reminders as to what your duties or tasks are from one moment to the next, then you might think the hands-on personal responsibility nature of the job is bad.

If you hate being micromanaged, then you might think all the DOT regulations are bad (which pretty much all of us do).

There are plenty of other aspects of this life that you may or may not consider "bad," and any combination of them could mean that this isn't the career path for you. But like all of us, you have to take them all into consideration, weigh them carefully, and ultimately decide for yourself. Nobody else can make that decision for you.

Good luck!

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Super introvert here so if I don't have to "sell" jobs to people and talk to people all the time i'm great with that!

I have a fiancee, no kids..during the season we don't get to spend much time together during the week anyway. That is one thing about OTR i'm concerned about, I don't want to spend weeks and weeks away...I'm ok with several nights to a full week.

From what I know, the personal responsibilities of trucking is more preferred than what i'm doing now. (just based on my personality)

Yeah, I don't think there's much getting around the DOT stuff.

That's where im stuck. Just weighing the options and figuring out which route to take. I do know I would want to drive for myself.

You might want yo look at vompsnies that offer more regional work. Out 7-10 days home for 2-3

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Hazmat and a TWIC card

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I've been driving now for the same company for a year now and now I'm thinking about trying to get a TWIC card and my hazmats I just want to get people's opinions on the pros and cons of having a hazmat and TWIC card . Thanks

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Do you need a TWIC card? Unless your going in and out of the ports, I see no need for it. HAZMAT and Tanker definitely.

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Extra job opportunities if you ever decide to go local. My local tanker gig requires a TWIC card, but I still have never needed to use it. But they require you to have it just in case.

Besides, it was so easy and simple to get why not?

I work in Chicago Local Intermodal, so no need for a TWIC CARD. But if you would be going to the ports, then yes. You should get 1. It's just expensive, unless your company will pick up the cost.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Refresher course, KLLM or Schneider National

I'm currently looking into either doing my refresher course through KLLM or Schneider. Right now I'm leaning towards KLLM because of the reviews that they have on their training program. I spoke with the recruiters from both companies and had most of my questions answered. I understand that the recruiters are sales people and need to do their job. So, with that said, do any of you have any experience with either company that may help me in my decision? I drove for Schneider 9 years ago and thought they were a good company to start with. Again, from what I have been reading, it seems as though KLLM may be a better choice this time around. Any feed back would be appreciated!!

KLLM is about 70% lease drivers. I know Schneider is a very good company to work for.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Looking for a change

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm a little confused by your mention of "no touch freight" and having a tänker endorsement. Most tanker jobs require some physical work, including handling hoses to connect for loading and unloading, and for some, climbing up to the top of the tank to vent it. What do you mean by "no touch?" Anything less than flatbed, or literally 99% drop and hook box work? (I will say that a buddy of mine just started a sweet job hauling drop and hook hazmat tankers for a subcontractor of Quality Carriers, but those jobs are few and far between.)

Some customers have liquid loaded in totes, barrels or just plain bottled water and won't let you pull there freight without a tanker endorsement.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Hazmat and a TWIC card

I've been driving now for the same company for a year now and now I'm thinking about trying to get a TWIC card and my hazmats I just want to get people's opinions on the pros and cons of having a hazmat and TWIC card . Thanks

Do you need a TWIC card? Unless your going in and out of the ports, I see no need for it. HAZMAT and Tanker definitely.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Silly Question - Where would I pick up my truck - at a terminal?

I recently attended a seminar held at the local NJ unemployment office featuring two gentlemen from Winsor Tractor Trailer Driving School in Linden. Among other things, they said that their biggest client was Werner Trucking. A question that I forgot to ask an obvious question: If I get a cdl and am hired by Werner, do I need to pick up the truck and starting driving from Werner's nearest terminal in Allentown, Pennsylvania? Allentown is a better than two-hour drive from where I currently live in northern NJ. I'll move closer to Allentown if I must start driving from there. I wondered if they have some sort of facility/facilities in NJ. I've seen few Werner trucks on my neck of the highway. Thanks. Elizabeth

Research more companies. Werner isn't the only fish in the sea

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Is everyone aware the ATA has lobbied for "anti-trucker" wages? Urgent!

This FAA bill is scheduled to be voted on THIS MONTH. Truckers are urged to call the Govt. switchboard at 202-224-3121 and ask their reps to REMOVE Anti-Trucker wage amendments.

Yes, speaker Ryan has dreamt of this since he was going to kegger parties in college

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Felon who wants to be a truck driver. Is it possible? Any advise,please.Not a sex offender.

I am in the middle of my life and I have made a few mistakes. I am not a career criminal. I just went down the wrong path for a short minute. I have always wanted to drive a truck and I will do what ever it takes to make it happen. I would like some advise form anyone on how to go about this new career. Is there anyone out there that has had to overcome the hurdles that go along with being a convicted felon? I have never had a CDL on any training. My driver license is in good shape with 1 DUI that is almost 10 years old. Do things still drop off your MVR after so many years? Please forgive me if this is the wrong forum for this type of question! I am just starting to reach out and research what I need to do. Thank you in advance for your help!!!

It all depends on how long ago your felony conviction was, and what kind of felony. However, you won't know til you start talking to trucking companies

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Accident While In training.

Sambo, I have no issue at all with what you're saying but unfortunately a lot of trainers are lease drivers. In fact, that's part of the business model for these large carriers. This is how they help their lease drivers succeed. The company will supply the lease driver with a student to train at a reduced wage. The lease driver makes more money, the company gets more trainers, and the student gets trained. This is a pretty common practice now.

I don't know how that salary model would be worked out with a lease driver. A salary is always a "disincentive" to do more work, as opposed to mileage pay being an incentive to do more work. If you put them on salary they're going to want to drive a certain number of miles and then quit. There's no sense in driving any further if you can't make more money.

This has been one of those neverending issues in trucking that no one has ever really seemed to figure out. With all of the things the DOT regulates it amazes me that they won't set some sort of minimum training standards for truck drivers. Truck drivers should get a significant portion of their road training while they're still in school, not out in the real world hauling freight.

And it's odd because the trucking industry has always been clamoring for new drivers, and yet the length of private schooling is so short that the government won't back student loans the way they will for other trade schools. I went to school for a year for Harley Davidson mechanics and was given a full loan from the government for $12,000 to cover the entire thing. I had a part time job during schooling to cover my living expenses.

If the DOT would require a minimum amount of training time, private schooling would then qualify for federal backing and students could get loans to go to private schools. They would spend 3 - 6 months there, depending on how long the minimum requirement is. Then the students can relax and get their road training at school instead of in the real world trying to hustle and make money.

This has been an issue for decades. It doesn't seem like you'd need a team of rocket scientists to come up with a better system. But somehow here we are still to this day and everyone is walking that fine line between safety and productivity.

At JB HUNT, trainers are company drivers and get paid a bonus per day on top of the miles and stops made. I had 2 great trainers here at JB. 1 in regional and another when I switched to local.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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Question

1,if tendem get close to the fifth wheel when u backing 2,tendem get far from fifth wheel.. these two make different when u backing semi...

Yes, it does make a difference. When backing in tight quarters, I like the tandems slid all the way up towards the 5th wheel.

Posted:  2 years, 1 month ago

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New Article Published: Your Best Advice To A Driver Preparing To Go Solo

Short but simple from my 1st trainer "Don't hit anything "

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Is it good to work for unions ?

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I understand your points Bud. The one point I was trying to make is that I don't see OD or any other LTL lowering their already established wages, or offering lower starting wages to new employees if the unions go away. I just don't see that happening.

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You don't see it happening, and yet it happens all the time. It's been happening in just about every blue collar industry in this country since the 80's. I just gave you an example of a plant in Buffalo that used to pay $29/hr and now they pay $14, and that's one of about 1,000 plants like that. Why do you think they call the Northeast and the upper Midwest "The Rust Belt?" Because it's loaded with old, rusted out dead factories that used to pay great money. Generations of people were raised on those awesome wages and benefits, and now they're all gone.

Do you think anyone saw any of that coming? And in fact it never should have happened.

What do you think Bruce was singing about?

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Now Main Street's whitewashed windows and vacant stores
Seems like there ain't nobody wants to come down here no more
They're closing down the textile mill across the railroad tracks
Foreman says these jobs are going boys and they ain't coming back
To your hometown

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Bud just gave you an example from a completely different industry, the packing business, where wages used to be high but aren't anymore.

The bottom line is simple. Your job isn't going to go away, but your job pays 50% more than almost any other trucking job in the country for one reason only - the unions. That's the one and only reason and that's not an opinion, that's a fact. And when the unions are gone, so is the one and only reason for your company, or any of the others in your sector, to pay 50% more than anyone else in the industry is paying.

You're home every night, you don't touch any freight, and you just shuttle trailers between terminals. Why would that pay more than any other trucking job out there? It shouldn't. And you know it, and I know it, and the people who run LTL companies know it.

Trust me, millions of families throughout the rust belt didn't want to see it coming either. Detroit, Buffalo, Cleveland, and many other cities are half dead now when they used to be some of the most thriving cities in the country. I lived through it when my dad and most of my extended family lost their jobs in the 80's. So you can call my personal life experiences conjecture if it makes you feel better about the long term prospects of your job. But I know first hand what happens when the unions lose their strength and you will too if it ever comes to that.

And I'm not being hostile in the least. I'm just telling you what I know from my personal life experiences.

What Brett said

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Is it good to work for unions ?

I believe unions are good, help to create a living wage, get decent health benefits, PTO etc. I also believe unions help to make non union companies have competitive wages and benefits. Accept if something happens and you're called into the office to speak about an incident for example, you will not have representation. That is just 1 example

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Struggling Making Delivery Times And Getting Sleep....

I've been getting loads that pick up in the evening and deliver next morning. Some are 11 hours away running at 60 mph. The reasoning for the 23hours being awake was we drove all night, from 2pm till 1am. Then was dealing with shipper issues. After I drove my full 11 with only 5 minutes left on my drive clock. After that I took an hour nap waiting for receivers to open. I had to wait for my dock to open then I got unloaded. This was 3 hours after. I off duty drove to a loves that was 5 miles away because they had no parking. And now here I am. This is one example of the loads I've been getting. These last 3 nights I've had to burn my 14 because I couldn't stay awake so I'd pull over and sleep. I just talked to my dispatcher and he completely understands and he apologized for giving me only hot loads. He's working to give me loads with more time so I don't have to burn up my clock and I can choose to drive day.

Have you tried doing an 8/2 split ?

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Game: what forum member impressed you it made you proud?

Errol is my guy. Has great advice, great insight. And really helped me when was going through training and had gotten homesick

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Will an employed driver be required to have a smartphone on the road?

Right now I have an Obamaphone. It is a smart phone Android that is free to me. It has limited mobile features however.

I would not want to spend my earnings on a mobile telephone subscription and equipment that is expensive.

I would want something like Trucker Path to aid navigation over the road.

Can Trucker Path be built into on/in-dash GPS systems? Is it a smartphone app only?

I have a laptop, but those don't seem very handy behind the wheel.

I would think modern trucks would have an advanced GPS system built into the dash with something like Trucker Path built right in to the system.

Do truckers have to actually mount their smartphones on the rig's dash?

If Trucker Path is a phone-only app, what type of phone instrument and phone carrier would I have to subscribe to to have Trucker Path access on the road?

Will this phone also be able to have Internet access without a wi-fi connection?

Part of learning the trucking trade is to know what electronics and technology I will prudently need, how to use it fast and efficiently, who will provide them and who has to pay for them.

Are phones used by truckers on the job company-supplied?

You can get yourself a truckers GPS. But always, always refer to your truckers atlas first and be sure to read any road signs. You should be able to request directions from your dispatcher as well. Although you don't need a smartphone, I highly recommend it. Make sure you have good coverage. Cricket sounds good as well as straighttalk and for a contract phone Verixon being the best

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Every Day is an Adventure

A lot of customers like to use the trailers for extra storage space. At my company, they start charging the customers a fee after x amount of days if the trls are not mt and ready for us to take out.

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Question for our prime-ates here

When I was doing OTR, my truck was governed at 65. So I figured I could travel on average 600 miles a day if I had to. Also, an experienced driver gave me a good tip on how to run my clock. I would drive 10,10,10,8,8,8,8. That method worked great for me. Only had to do 1 34 hr reset in 6 months and that was because of the planner not listening to me about the time I had left on my clock.

Posted:  2 years, 2 months ago

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Not looking good for me....

I have fir the most part tried to be positive through this whole training experience. However these last few days I'm riding an all time low. My TNT phase is almost over as far as miles are concerned. My trainers attitude has been better. All things considering I should be elated to start this new adventure. However I have yet to figure out or impress my trainer enough with my backing maneuvers. I'm starting to think my training will continue, and financially I don't think I can continue if that's the case. I am spread pretty thin and bringing home just $1600 a month is not something I can do for very much longer.

The backing problems I have all start with the set up. If I get a good set up which is rare, I usually guide it too far to the blindside. To date this has been ok since all my backs have been empty on my blindside.

I honestly just don't know if I will get this. My trainer has done all he can do. But my brain does not get what he is saying. I have yet to hit anything, and I do eventually make it into the hole, but like I said I'm either not straight, not centered, not aimed right, there is always something I have done wrong. I just can't get it right.

Do as many pull ups as necessary

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