Profile For William P.

William P.'s Info

  • Location:
    Farmington, NY

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    5 years, 8 months ago

William P.'s Bio

Started my driving career while in the US Air Force in the 80's driving Cab over trucks mostly 1969 MACKS. Upon leaving the service I took a job as a Building Superintendent. I forgot about trucking, then I was laid off and came back to Trucking. I spent 3 years over the road and fell into a local milk hauling job. Because of my experience in driving and being safety motivated, guess I should include the 22 years in the local Volunteer Fire Department, I was able to become a Trainer / Safety Supervisor.

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Posted:  11 months, 3 weeks ago

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How to get off my DM's bad side

My first few month's solo were like that. My trainer was only worried about the money She'd make so let's say I learned by doing. There are good and bad trainers out there, I learned what I could and moved on. I worked with my Dispatcher and at first I think they all try to push you. They want to see how you'll perform under pressure. After a while I learned how to complete most everything and my Dispatcher backed. A big thing I learned was use written conversation that way you cover your "bacon" and you'll have an electronic paper trail. Telephone conversions will turn into I said They said arguments. Good luck once you learn it it will be like you knew it all along.

Posted:  1 year, 1 month ago

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Can CBD pop positive?

Found this video on You tube, I firmly believe in not using CBD please watch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjnfjukpnQw

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

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Proper Tire Inflation for Tractors and Trailers

There is a natural loss of air (very slowly)that occurs in all Tires so it doesn't hurt to have a system on the truck. Besides most truck drivers don't check tire pressure with a gauge even though it's quite inexpensive. I'm attaching what I found on the Internet. "Your tires continually lose pressure due to permeation, a natural process where the air escapes from the tire's solid rubber sidewall (roughly 1-2 psi of air a month). Weather can affect inflation pressures; your tire pressure reduces by about 1 psi for every 10-degree drop in the outside temperature." This is from a Tire sales company and I don't want to support any company over another thats why I didn't include the company Name.

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Official solo Primate soon with questions!

Congratulations. I ran NE for Prime in a LW for 1 1/2 years then went CONDO and I was Refer. Back when I ran we were able to have the Passenger seat removed, that gave me more room. I still keep in touch with my ex students and they tell me you can't have the seat removed. But it never hurts to ask. Remember the inverter will only accommodate so much power. I kept a small Microwave on the truck and a coleman DC cooler, no frozen but holds a lot. Like was said be the go to guy for you dispatch in the long run it will get you the better runs and you'll make more money. You should be able to get the bonuses. Your Qualcomm is good, GPS but don't forget a good MAP. Finally Good luck and don't fear the NE, there are some tight spots but you can get through it, stay safe.

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Well it was fun while it lasted.

Sorry to hear about the attack, everyone is right take care of yourself first, I'd say remember family and Jobs will come and go. Your company sounds great trying to keep you working, they definitely value you as an employee. I'm in NY and you brought up Agriculture as an option. Remember there are quite a few products in that category, I work in Milk. It's a year round gig in Agriculture. I'm not pushing you to overwork you know your health situation but just giving and option. And Ryder truck here has a contract with a milk coop all the drivers work for Ryder. Good Luck and stay healthy you only get 1 life and I'm sure there's people that love you and want you around.

Posted:  1 year, 6 months ago

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Best headset for trucker

Robert B is in my opinion correct if you're trying to get you CDL you should concentrate on the driving. If you have your license and are talking about learning the company policies and procedure, I highly advise getting a blue tooth of some kind. As a trainer I didn't allow my trainees to talk while driving, mostly because I'm talking alot about what they're doing right and wrong trying to correct problems. After they have their CDL they can use a bluetooth. I have 2 because I broke one and while waiting to get it replaced under warranty I bought a second they're both good. I have a Blue Tiger, and a Blue Parrot. Do the research, also remember only one ear piece should be covered. Good luck in training.

Posted:  1 year, 7 months ago

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Thinking of jumping ship from current carrier.

Don't jump ship so quickly, If you made it 6 months you're halfway there. Use the time to learn the business. From what you've said it sounds like you took a lease option as opposed to company driver. I was a company driver and took trainees, while I had them I tried to teach them the company side of the business, I also advised them to take a year learn the business then decide if they want to do the lease. I personally always like that when things broke on the truck it wasn't my responsibility to fix and they seemed to fix it quickly. As was stated the larger companies sign contracts with the shippers and receivers that vary from company to company, I remember 1 company was 1 minute after checking was that ing and 1 was 4 hours and several didn't pay detention. One other thing is that the driver didn't receive detention until the shipper or receiver paid it to the company therefore it could be a while. Ask questions and try to get answers, and you and your DM can't get along ask for a change. I had a lot of disagreement with mine but after I put forth the effort to show her I was going to be a good performer we got along great, we even became friends. I suggest finishing out your time, and read the contract you signed you may find to owe a lot of money for leaving early. One last thing I went to work with a man who had jumped companies so much few companies would consider him for Employment. He was happy to finally find a company that gave him a chance, he said he was regretting the moving around. You've picked a good career and there room for lots of enjoyment, but it is hard work. GOOD LUCK

Posted:  1 year, 7 months ago

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Backing does not just “click”

We drive a lot of miles forward but very little backward. It does come with time, one problem and I'm not sure you have this is overall length. When I drove over the road all our trailers were 53 footers and It was my tractor so my tractor and trailer movement was virtually the same every time. So it was easier to adapt to the amount of movement and changes I had to make. Over correcting is a major failure when backing, try to defeat that bad habit. GOAL can't be said enough if you Get Out And Look and get it in the hole without incident it's a successful back. Everyone is correct keep at it you will understand how the trailer reacts. If you run different length trailers and tractors as I now do it will be a little more difficult. One last thing I don't care how good you are you're going to have good days and bad ones, you might have something on your mind, be tired, a lot of sun blinding you, etc... Try to blackout those and all distractions when backing that should help. GOOD LUCK and stick with it.

Posted:  1 year, 8 months ago

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Prime PSD for CDL holders

When I was with PRIME My first trainee had his CDL but hadn't used it so he went through a modified PSD class, this is 6 years ago, he requested it. After our training time he did test out but just with a school instructor to insure he was up to snuff. He was still required to do 40,000 miles of TNT time (I believe its 50,000 now). The time goes faster than you'd think. Good Luck

Posted:  1 year, 8 months ago

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Have had CDL for a year but no experience. Who will hire me and train me?

I agree you should wait. I haven't seen anyone mention the new FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse, potential employers will be able to access to check on your previous test results. If you test positive then it will follow you on this register. The wait will also give you a chance to make sure you're over the urge to fall back on an old problem. There quite a few companies that will train you so it shouldn't be a problem finding somewhere to find a job. Good Luck and stay safe in these rough times.

Posted:  1 year, 9 months ago

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New Grad: decision - prime or covenant ?

I did work for one of those you listed, I don't like to endorse one over the other because I think they all have merit. Let me put it this way, do the research and review each company. Find the one that fits what you want the best out of a career and then make your decision. I'm a believer in don't be lured by the sign on bonus because if there is a large bonus they possibly can't keep drivers. I looked for a company that would keep me rolling and had lots of freight options, I also took a look at their CSA score and safety record. I spent a lot of time researching and found it to be worth while because I for a company that I was very happy driving for.

One note I was also a Refer trainer for that company and thought they had a good program. I like to talk to people (Important idea) I found out that all trainers are not created equal, guess I knew it all along, and there are good and bad one. I count myself as either lucky or a good trainer because most of the trainees I had were successful in their jobs. But I also hooked up with trainees that had bad trainers and those trainers weren't concerned with trainees success.

Good Luck, make sure to do the hard work and complete your research you'll be much happier if you do and it'll keep you firmly planted in that company which will lead to greater feelings of Success.

Posted:  1 year, 9 months ago

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Gonna be a OTR driver.....Soon.....I hope

Hi Mike,

Old School has answered many of your questions and I'm probably repeating some of what he said. When I started I wasn't told that for the company I worked for it was 7 days out 1 day off with a maximum of 5 days off at one time. It's important to get that information so you know what to expect. Once on you're own your dispatcher will probably try to push you to do your best. Remember it's important that you work with that Dispatcher, but run safe and legal. Do the best you can to be on time, try to make it all the time and if you're going to be late communicate that information. Establishing yourself will help you get more miles which equates to more money.

My experience is to work with your dispatcher because they are the ones giving you your miles. I was almost always on time, except when the shipper loaded me late or dispatcher sent me late. These are not you fault and if you can't make the schedule make sure they know right away. If you do this you'll establish yourself as a reliable driver and get more miles. I was lucky I had a good dispatcher and she realized my potential and I progressed quickly. I would stay out more than most being SINGLE and so I stayed out 2 or more months at a time still only getting 5 days off but if i need a couple more days they worked with me. Again all this was after I established myself. I really enjoyed my time over the road and was making good money, but had to take a local job to be closer to my Parents because of health reasons.

One other thing I'm not sure what you're plan is but talk to drivers and decide which division you might like, Flatbed and tTankerdo have some slow times, I was Refer even certain time are slow there too. Make sure if you haven't made up your mind to talk to those drivers. Most drivers are happy to talk to you and even when i'd stop during break I'd sit and talk to other company drivers, most are easy to chat with. There will be some that won't like the company you work for but I always approached it as you're just another person I want to talk to. I rarely had problems talking to any driver. Finally drivers like to tell stories and so take what they say and sort through whats a story and whats truth. That in itself is sometimes difficult.

I wish you good luck it's a great job.

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