Comments By Sambo

https://cdn.truckingtruth.com/misc-images/sambo.jpg avatar
  • Sambo
  • Joined:
  • 5 years, 5 months ago
  • Comments:
  • 718

Page 2 of 36

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Here is a scenario, advice please!

So, you were right not to take any pills from him. Know that if it was prescription, and you take a medicine not prescribed to you, it will be a failed drug test if you get caught. Also, even if they were not prescription, I would never take any kind of "power pills". Likely they were pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, commonly known as "mini thins". I can't be sure, might have been just caffeine pills, but, if they were mini thins, i would be curious how he got them, since pseudoeffedrine hydrochloride has been banned from being sold over the counter. Not to mention, if you take them enough, they can have adverse health implications.

If you picked up at 1pm, I assume you started your day at around noon? This would mean your 14 hour clock would have expired at 2am the next morning, so, provided you didn't use up your 11 hours of driving, that would have been the latest you could drive.

Remember, safety above all else. If you are too tired to drive, shut down.

As far as your trainer, make a call to your dm, explain the situation. I'm not advocating getting someone in trouble, but, your trainer should not be trying to get you to break the law, and he certainly should not be offering you pills. However, this needs to be fixed, because, how many times has he done this in the past, how many times will he continue to do it if allowed to go unchecked.

Do you run electronic logs? If so, you wouldn't have been able to run past your 14, unless he is having you drive on his login, which, again, is a no no. Paper logs is another story, but again, it is neither legal, nor safe.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Why does companies like TMC have a mph of 62 when....

I have to wonder how much fuel savings are really there. I know there is some, but how much, and at the risk of what safety.

They say for every mph you shave off, you gain .1mpg fuel economy. Here's the deal though, during the course of my day, I'm speeding up and slowing down constantly, almost entirely due to the fact that other vehicles (4 wheelers and 18 wheelers both) will pass and cut in front of me, sometime with no more than a car length gap.

In the case of trucks, they may be going only 2mph faster. This means I am having to either ride their bumper for the next 5 miles while they pull away, which isn't an option, or, tap the brake and slow down to open the gap. Even 4 wheelers, a lot of the time, are not going fast enough to open the gap in a safe amount of time. On a 65 mph stretch of freeway, it only accounts for a 3mph difference, and 8mph on a 70mph freeway. This means it is still taking 15 to 20 seconds or more to achieve the proper safe gap between vehicles. Again, more time than I am comfortable with to be following that close to a vehicle.

Then, in congested traffic, you end up being stuck in the right lane, because riding the second lane means you are impeding the faster traffic and that draws a lot of frustration from other drivers.

This constant slowing down and speeding up has to be a fuel economy killer, and presents a safety risk.

I know that these interactions will still happen at 70mph, but they would happen far less frequently, because, for the most part, you'd be able to keep up with the flow of traffic.

Then, on top of that, let's say you take a 62mph truck and turn it up to 70mph. Now this truck is doing approximately 80 to 90 more miles in a day, which would equate to possibly 500 to 600 more miles per week, up to 2400 miles per month. This could mean a potential 1 to 2 more loads per month, which would probably be enough to offset the cost of lost fuel economy, and, the driver makes more money as well. That's a win win.

I know its a company vehicle, and they set the rules, but I am curious if the fuel savings are really there. I have to think that they know what they are doing, and have studied the numbers, but, from my perspective, it doesn't make sense when you take into account the above factors.

Are the fuel savings really enough to offset the constant changing of speed and lost revenue of 2 more loads each month?

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Has anyone heard of KLLM Transport Services?

KLLM runs volvo vn780's from what I've seen. Nice!! Question, every KLLM truck I see says "leased to kllm" on the door. Are they a majority OO company?

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Anyone near Pilot #249 in Troy Illinois?

I stopped in there yesterday for fuel, then took a 10 hour break there the day before that. Maybe they'll send me back down that way on my next load.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

What trucker gps is better? My qualcomm keeps getting me into trouble...

Gotta be honest, I'm about fed up with my garmin. It reboots on it's own, and when you try to do custom route shaping, it keeps wanting to revert back to the original route it found initially.

It does a decent job at routing and when you can get your custom route programmed, it's nice. I'm going to eventually go back with the rand McNally when I save enough to purchase one. Rand has a new 740 model which is the same price as the 730 model. Was going to get the tablet, but I've heard it doesn't get good reviews. I like the tablet version though because it has built in dash cam, and has the RM atlas built into the unit as well.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

On ramp etiquette

There really is no perfect systematic solution other than just ride the middle lane. I usually try not to do that though because of Colorado's law--"keep right except to pass." All it takes is an over-zealous cop to decide I absolutely must stay in the right lane, even though I'm trying to avoid a collision with merging traffic. And lots of other states don't allow trucks in the far left lane, so I'm forcing them to either stay behind me or pass on the right. So, personally, I've found it really helps to just slow down in cities in general. I turn off the cruise and go around 55 mph or less--seems to help avoid unpleasant encounters with kamikaze drivers.

But still, if there's a lot of traffic merging all at once, or if a truck is trying to merge, I'll get over if I can.

Like I said, no perfect solution... just do your best to cope with the chaos and not hit anything.

That's probably the most sensible thing, just slow down so all traffic is faster than you and let them all pass. Problem is, still, the merging traffic. Especially when you have 4 or 5 cars trying to enter the roadway at the same time. I usually just watch and slow down according to the cars that are ahead of me. If there are 5 cars coming on and 3 are ahead of me and 2 along side of me or to the rear, I'll slow enough to let the ahead cars in but the cars along side will have to slow down to get behind me. The only other option is to slow down enough to let all of them in, but doing so will cause more traffic backup.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

On ramp etiquette

And of course we all love when you can't get over because traffic has you pinned in the right lane and someone merging rides alongside you waiting for you to move. When they finally have to hit the brakes and fall in behind you, they get mad, mash the throttle to the floor, and whiz by you at 80 mph in the left lane with their middle finger out the window.

rofl-3.gif

Of course it's like, "If you woulda hit the gas like that in the first place.......but noooo.....and now you're mad and your middle finger is covered with bugs."

smile.gif

Exactly! When did people start putting down the on ramp, and then hit the gas once they hit the freeway, it didn't used to be like that long ago. The on ramp is for acceleration, so get on with it.....

I wonder if it has to do with people trying to save fuel. Higher gas prices means people are afraid to mash the pedal?

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

I was a baaaaaad boy! I also did my good deed for today.

Lol, yeah, that's unacceptable...to unload a trailer....at a distribution center!

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Advice for staying happy on the road.

Aside from proper diet and exercise, limiting stress on the body will help promote a better driving day.

Try to limit the exposure to stresses on the body. One of the things you can do to help is develop thick skin. There are things that will eat at you out here. Learn to not let them bother you. This is not to say that you should develop an apathetic attitude, but rather learn to take things in stride. Do the best that you can, but when problems arise, don't let yourself get bent out of shape by them. Stop and think through the problem, ask for help. At the end of the day, there is no problem that cant be fixed, and there is no load too important that you have to risk safety to do. Slow down and realize that mistakes will happen, it's how we deal with them and how we learn from them that matters.

Traffic got you frazzled? Tired of getting cut off and having to slow down all the time? Yes, it bothers me too, but, a change of perspective can actually make these situations better.

Trucker or 4 wheeler cuts you off, rather than getting upset, realize that by altering your speed and opening the gap is actually a testament to your being a safe and observant driver. This should make you feel some pride because it means you are doing it right. Flying off the handle on the cb isn't going to help anything but make the other driver mad too, and getting upset over it will increase stress on your body and mind. We just have to realize that creating an argument will not solve the problem, so why even start one. Just drive your truck safely and take pride that you are doing it better than the other guy. You can use this in many other situations as well.

There are some things worth getting upset at, and there are some that are not. Learn to weed out the emotional response to the things that are not worth it will help keep stress from building up.

Make sure to get enough sleep. Obviously, this is the biggest one for being alert and awake behind the wheel. Try to get enough sleep each night/day. Lack of sleep will cause you to be drowsy, and a continual lack of sleep can lead to a sleep deficit which can be hard to catch up on. When you do sleep, try to make the environment as comfortable as possible. Use AC and heater to keep the cab at optimal temperatures, and fans if necessary. I know some companies limit idle time but if you are not sleeping properly, this can be dangerous. This is why I think companies who do not provide apu units should not have restrictions on idle time. If you are not comfortable when sleeping, this means you are not getting quality sleep, and this can have dire consequences.

Also, best sleep is done in pitch black environment. Your sub conscious can pick up on light in the area and cause a reduction in the quality of sleep. As drivers, we sleep during all hours. This means trying to block out as much light as you can. Cab curtains, bunk curtains, maybe even a sleep mask for light blockage. Also, put your cell phone and other electronic devices in a place where if it lights up on it's own, you won't be able to see it.

Lastly, silence is golden. During the day, if you are the type that likes to listen to hard driving rock music, this can actually be a stress increase. Also, listening to political talk radio can increase stress. Loud music can cause you to have to focus harder on the road.

Sometimes, turning the radio off for awhile can help you relax and decompress. Myself, I like to turn to a classical station or ambient station if you have satellite radio. Calming music can help relieve stress and put you in a relaxed state and make your drive more enjoyable. Also, you can use audio books with a positive message. Just be cautious as some people tend to become too relaxed when listening to classical music and can become sleepy.

Basically, it's about finding balance. Treat your body well, eat right, exercise and limit stresses on your body, and it will lead to a happier and healthier drive. smile.gif

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Advice for staying happy on the road.

This may not be for everyone, but it helps me, and it might be able to help you.

The road has many ups and downs. You are tired, lonely, miss your spouse and children. The weather isn't cooperating, AC is busted, appointment times are tight, and traffic is driving you crazy. It all feels like you are going to explode at times.

The key to managing all of this is to decompress whenever possible. By this, I mean, learn to relax whenever you have the opportunity. When you have down time, let it be down time and not time thinking about the job.

Being tense all the time, frustrated and angry will actually be counter productive. You tend to do better work when you are relaxed rather than uptight.

Again, when you have time off, learn to forget about the road and your career, and just enjoy the moment surrounding you.

But, what about those long weeks on the road? How to manage that? There are some things you can do to make life easier while out here, and they are quite simple.

Most of it has to do with treating your body right. Treat your body right and it will make life out here so much easier.

By this I mean a few things. Eating right can be difficult out here, but it can be done. Don't fall into the trap that you see a lot of drivers fall into by keeping a bag of chips, and a box of donuts next to your seat at all times, and that 100 ounce mug full of mountain dew all of the time. Too many carbs and too much sugar will cause weight gain and cause you to feel sluggish. Me, personally, I hate fighting sleep while trying to drive. It actually can get me angry because it's one of the worst feelings.

Yes, the sugar and mt dew may give you a pick me up, but when it wears off, it will cause you to be drowsy.

Eating healthy can help by managing weight and reduce the bad stuff going into your body. I like to keep trail mix and apples next to my seat, but don't over indulge. Just enough to keep your hunger at bay. Drink water and natural fruit juices instead of soda. If you want a little flavor, they sell things like water additives, such as Mio, that can help if you want a little flavor, but I wouldn't over use them, as the artificial sweeteners are not really good for you either, but can help when you need a change fro plain water.

Water intake can actually help speed up your metabolism, which can help with weight management, but also helps flush the body of toxins, which can help reduce the feeling of sluggishness. Only down side is that you may have to stop to urinate more often, but, that in itself can get you out of the truck to move around a little and keep the blood flowing.

When you have to stop for rest breaks, avoid truck stops if you can. Try to stop at a rest area. Not only can you get in and out more quickly, but you have less temptation to buy things, including food and sodas.

Coffee is also a good alternative to soda if you need caffeine, and there are many flavored creamers that can make that cup of Joe that much more enjoyable. Myself, I like the large coffe at pilot, with 2 to 3 sweet n low packets and some French vanilla creamer. Makes a good cup of coffee.

Instead of eating at the buffet, but things you can store in your truck. You can buy a thermoelectric cooler and store milk and vegetables, use storage containers to keep dry goods. Peanut butter, tuna, canned chicken breast, granola bars, instant oatmeal, and dry pack stew, spaghetti, chicken Alfredo are things that can be microwaved in the truck stop if you don't have a microwave in the truck. Just go easy on the dry pack foods as they contain a lot of sodium, but they can provide a quick meal that is easy on the budget, when needed.

Try to limit buffet meals and other truck stop foods to no more than twice a week. This will help keep you from over eating and keep you from eating things that are not good for you, and also help to keep your wallet from being drained.

Exercise can be done while on the truck, and it doesn't take much to do. Exercise promotes good blood flow and can help to keep you energized. I keep a workout band in the truck, some people use dumbells, whatever works for you.

Every other day, I'll do about 10 minutes of step exercises using the rear access step on truck, then, I'll do about 4 laps of walking around the truck parking area at a brisk pace. Then I'll come back to the truck and so curls and tricep extensions with my workout band. You can also wrap the band around the back of your seat, or a hand rail on your truck and do ab crunches.

Anything to keep the body moving and to try to ward off stagnation, and help keep your cardio up and your muscles active, will help keep you more alert in the seat of the truck.

(Continued)

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

On ramp etiquette

I try to be accommodating while in those situations, but, in cities where there are a lot of on ramps, in probably going to be in lane 2 more often than lane 1. There are more interactions when in the merging lane, which are more opportunities for something to go wrong. Also, it kills your fuel economy if you are having to speed up and slow down constantly.

The problem is that most cities now have the "no trucks in left lanes" rule. That needs to go away. Here is, in my opinion, how it should work. On a 4 lane through a city, left lane should be for fast through traffic, maybe put a minimum speed of 68mph. Lane 3 should be for slower through traffic, minimum speed 60mph. Lane 2 for local travel, maximum speed 60 mph, and lane 1 for traffic merging on and off the freeway.

Not sure if that would work but seems like it would make traffic flow more easily, or some variant of this approach.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Eye Candy

And yes, after I took those pictures, I realized I might need to clean the lenses on my phone...lol..

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Eye Candy

20161104_195643_zpsbtrbuhiu.jpg

20170101_190444_zpsa6feeohx.jpg

20161112_142016_zpsylhtosnp.jpg

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

I was a baaaaaad boy! I also did my good deed for today.

Warehouses love to hoard trailers. I've heard rumors that there are some warehouses that have up to 100 of a particular company's trailers on their lot.

Makes it rough when you have drivers searching for empties, and these distribution centers have all of your trailers tied up, but, that is the deal made between your company and the DC. Often, these dc's have agreements with a company that they will always have x number of trailers on hand in order to be pre loaded.

That is why a lot of them will not allow you to bobtail in to pick up a pre load. They want that empty trailer to replace the one you are taking.

Posted:  4 years, 5 months ago

View Topic:

On ramp etiquette

I get frustrated by this scenario as well. 99% of the time I just tap my brakes and let them merge.

The problem with driving a governed truck is that if you merge into the second lane, you'll be impeding the faster traffic, and this usually brings many colorful metaphors and nice comments about your company, over the cb.

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Trucking At Night Versus During The Day?

It's always a good idea to have that experience. Driving at night is a little different because your body is not used to being up all night. Takes some getting used to.

Also, lack of visibility can create more strain on the body. A lot of these trucks have bad head lights that seem to only light up about 2 car lengths in front of you on low beam. Driving through the twisty mountain roads where there is a lot of traffic where you can't really utilize your high beams means you can't often see very far in front of you. Have to be extra careful and slow down a little.

Now, depending on what you are hauling, either if your trainers answers could be true. At knight, our dry van side has a lot of loads that have a window to drop, and thus those guys can plan their runs to only drive during the day. They generally don't have set appointment times. Often, it's "drop this load between 8am and 4pm", for example.

Refer side, on the other hand, has very little drop and hook, so there are very few appointments that have a window. This means that in order to meet your delivery time, you have to drive at all hours of the day and night. Most of the time, you are taking your 10 off, and then driving again, which means your drive time could change drastically from day to day.

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Bump in the night..

That was good of you to get out and help. I feel for the guy, I don't like blind side backing.

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Need advice, or maybe a slap upside the head....

It's hard for me, because I'm my own worst critic. Ask me privately and I'll tell you I feel that I'm doing ok, ask me publicly and I'll tell you that I don't know, ask those who are over me. That's just how I am. I'm never one to brag in myself, and I often downplay anything good that I do, because I don't like talking myself up, it's just not how I'm built. Humble I guess you could say..to a fault.

As far as the late loads, honestly, I can think of only 2 that have been my fault. One because I mixed up the appointment time and the other because I didn't realize I had crossed a time zone, and was about an hour behind.

Totally, I've been late about 8 or 9 times in the last year, but 7 of those were either really tight times, weather, or I was dispatched on a load that there was no way I could have gotten to it on time because I didn't get finished at my previous live unload in time.

I'm never one to downplay my mistakes. I'll face up to them every time. I don't make excuses, I don't try to pass the blame. If I'm at fault, I'll be the first to admit it.

Now, my dm says he is really happy with me, so I asked him if the planners were mad at me for something, he said they weren't. He told me that you have to REALLY mess up to get on their black list. He also told me that if they were unhappy with my performance, I would know about it.

I've talked to him about it (my dm) and he found me a good load, so maybe it's going to get better. Honestly, it could just be some of the freight lanes ate slow right now, which I understand. I'm just blowing off some steam I suppose. Just seems like I've had quite a few slow weeks lately, but I keep my chin up and look for the best, and keep driving as best I can.

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Need advice, or maybe a slap upside the head....

"Ouch" but yeah, I probably needed that. I'm just dealing with some frustrations, but like normal, I'll get upset and then be over it in 15 minutes.

Posted:  4 years, 6 months ago

View Topic:

Need advice, or maybe a slap upside the head....

Thanks, and like I said, I'm really not expecting a "new" truck, just frustrated with the breakdowns and the down time between loads, and it gets even more annoying when you read about people getting these really great miles and great runs because they have told their dm that they won't run in certain areas, so, they get to cherry pick their work, and they still make awesome miles, and get really great fuel bonuses too.

My thoughts were, if you get in good with your dm and do a good job, that is when you get the special perks from your dm. And don't get me wrong, I'm not asking for special perks, I just want to be worked just like every other driver, but what I'm finding is the people who set down rules with their dm, and dictate where and how they will work, seem to be faring much better than those who simply let their dm run the show.

I guess I'm tires of hearing people brag about all the sunny southeast runs they get in the winter, and how they are making 3000+ miles each week, hitting fuel bonus every time, while you have others who will go out of their way to accommodate their dm, but are getting less than 2000 miles each week and couldn't hit the fuel bonus to save their lives.

Maybe I just need to stop reading these posts from other people lol.

Page 2 of 36

Previous Page
Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More