Accident While In Training.

Topic 20019 | Page 1

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:
Daniel Y.'s Comment
member avatar

I was in training going from Troy, Al to Allentown, PA. Only 2 and a half weeks in my 10 week training program. I was driving through Charlotte NC. Going North on 85 was to merge onto 77 south and the onto 77 north. When merging onto 77 south I looked up saw GPS come up and up and turn on 77 north. So tried to do it and flipped the tractor and trailer fully loaded. Me and trainer was sent to hospital. Trainer was sleeping in the sleeper. lost my phone in the accident trainer told me to call safety today. So I did and the forward me to the David Nelson who was over the bulk division I was assigned to. He relieved me of my position. How hard will it be to find another job or what should I do?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Rolling at rig at 2 weeks in, is going to be the kiss of death pretty much.

There is going to be a DOT Report on this, and depending on how/why they find fault - will depend on if you ever drive a rig again.

Most rollovers are caused by excessive speed (especially in poor road/weather conditions).

What did YOU DO, that contributed to the accident?

Sucky as it sounds - if you were at fault in a major accident, it's going to be a few years (if ever), before you can apply again - especially with only a couple of weeks experience.

If you clipped a car in a parking lot (or something like that), not as big of a deal as a total rollover.

I assume you were drug/alcohol tested at the hospital (pretty much mandatory in cases like these). Were you CITED?

Rick

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Rolling at rig at 2 weeks in, is going to be the kiss of death pretty much.

There is going to be a DOT Report on this, and depending on how/why they find fault - will depend on if you ever drive a rig again.

Most rollovers are caused by excessive speed (especially in poor road/weather conditions).

What did YOU DO, that contributed to the accident?

Sucky as it sounds - if you were at fault in a major accident, it's going to be a few years (if ever), before you can apply again - especially with only a couple of weeks experience.

If you clipped a car in a parking lot (or something like that), not as big of a deal as a total rollover.

I assume you were drug/alcohol tested at the hospital (pretty much mandatory in cases like these). Were you CITED?

Rick

Got a 25 dollar ticket exceeding safe speed troop came to hospital and gave me this ticket. 85 was under construction. Was a sudden move when gps said to merge onto 77 north. With be inexperienced thought I was ok to do so. All I can do I guess is keep shooting applications out their.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Rick pretty much nailed it with his response but your posting it allows for a learning moment for other drivers. One lesson would be that your route should have been planned out in advance rather than relying specifically on the GPS. You mentioned that the directions given were what made you react and that decision was part of the reason for the accident. I'm also curious as to why in the hell, a trainer is asleep in the back with a rookie driver only 2 weeks in effectively running solo. I may be wrong in my opinion but there's no way you should have been left alone like that being so new. I am glad to hear you're both ok and even more sorry to hear about the accident, I hope everything pans out ok.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick pretty much nailed it with his response but your posting it allows for a learning moment for other drivers. One lesson would be that your route should have been planned out in advance rather than relying specifically on the GPS. You mentioned that the directions given were what made you react and that decision was part of the reason for the accident. I'm also curious as to why in the hell, a trainer is asleep in the back with a rookie driver only 2 weeks in effectively running solo. I may be wrong in my opinion but there's no way you should have been left alone like that being so new. I am glad to hear you're both ok and even more sorry to hear about the accident, I hope everything pans out ok.

I totally agree with every word of this. I lived in Charlotte for almost 10 years, and driving through on 85 to 77 is no place for a two week rookie to be going it alone. Shame on your trainer.

I get the GPS thing, and this jist confirms something I've been thinking about for a while. My GPS crapped out a couple months ago, and I don't plan to replace it. I drove 38 years without using one, and two and a half years with one. Now I plan my trip in advance, including fuel stops, breaks, etc., and if it's a long trip, I write down the route changes in my little notebook like I did in a car before I ever had a GPS.

I feel like I've gotten part of my brain back. I remember where I've been a lot better, and I'm more alert. Routes seem simpler too, because now I'm thinking "Stay on US 59 to Denison, then take US 30 east" and I look for those signs, where the GPS invariably calls that same route by whatever little podunky county road happens to share 5 miles with a US highway. "Turn left on County Road A16" makes less sense than "Turn left to stay on US 59."

So from now on whenever we get a new version of that thread that asks, "Which GPS is best?", my answer is going to be "A map and your brain." Because that is the solemn truth.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Just curious as to when this happened? I run that area weekly now

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Agree with the Rick, Dragon and Bud Trio...insufficient trip planning.

Glad you lived to tell about it, so others can learn from this. Thanks for posting it.

My suggestion is to focus on healing up, physically and mentally. Your only shot might be re-entry from square one by applying for Company-Sponsored Training

Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I was in training going from Troy, Al to Allentown, PA. Only 2 and a half weeks in my 10 week training program. I was driving through Charlotte NC. Going North on 85 was to merge onto 77 south and the onto 77 north. When merging onto 77 south I looked up saw GPS come up and up and turn on 77 north. So tried to do it and flipped the tractor and trailer fully loaded. Me and trainer was sent to hospital. Trainer was sleeping in the sleeper. lost my phone in the accident trainer told me to call safety today. So I did and the forward me to the David Nelson who was over the bulk division I was assigned to. He relieved me of my position. How hard will it be to find another job or what should I do?

What kind of trailer were you pulling?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

So what company was this with? That info might help us steer you to a more forgiving company, but it will be tough.

I know this information is a bit late for you, but my company's policy on ramps and curves for brand new drivers is to take them at 1/2 the yellow advisory speed and after one has been driving awhile, 10 mph below the advisory speed.

Almost every single rollover is caused from taking a ramp it curve way too fast and is the driver's fault. I'm glad you and your trainer weren't seriously Injured.

When trying to find a new position with another company that trains new drivers, it will be important to accept full responsibility and hopefully you have learned a lot from this.

millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

Only thing I can tell you to do is apply like there is no tomorrow and if you have to take the company sponsored route then do that also.

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Paid CDL Training Programs

Check with EVERY company you can think of. If None of them will work with you then you may either have to wait until the accident falls off of your reports, DAC , PSP, MVRs, etc. Just make sure you are UP FRONT and HONEST with ANY COMPANY you APPLY for. You never know one might give you a chance. I didn't think CRST would give me a chance but here I am. Most importantly, have faith. You will get another job, you just have to be a LOT MORE CAREFUL in the future. This is a TOUGH mistake to bounce back from. Live and Learn from this and hopefully things get better. I will most certainly pray for you on here and hope you can bounce back from this. We are all here with you if you need us and we support you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Company Trainers GPS Systems On The Road In Training Reports From CDL Training Trip Planning Truck Driver Training Trucking Accidents
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More