Profile For Aces-N-eights (Dale)

Aces-N-eights (Dale)'s Info

  • Location:
    Las Vegas, NV

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

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  • Joined Us:
    6 years, 4 months ago

Aces-N-eights (Dale)'s Bio

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Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

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if I do three runs like that in a week 430x3=1290

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Can you do 3,000 miles per week with a job like that? How often would that happen? As an OTR driver I could average nearly 3,000 miles per week but if you're having to jump on flights or get rental cars or get trucks registered and all that stuff I don't see how you could have the time for very many 3,000 mile weeks.

I appreciate that you're trying to give people information but whether or not it's very helpful information isn't clear. You throw a few pie in the sky numbers out there and make it sound like everything's a write off and you have it made but I'm skeptical that over the course of a year after all of the taxes and other expenses that go with being a 1099 contractor are properly paid that you're really in that great of shape.

Many OTR companies have you in the 40 - 45 cpm range your rookie year, you can consistently average 2,600 - 3,200 miles per week, you're in brand new or nearly brand new equipment, you have all of the perks and benefits that come with being a company driver, and you can legally write off meal expenses and any work-related items you had to purchase. I'd be interested in comparing that to what you actually earn after all taxes and expenses in a year. It doesn't sound like you have a bad job but there's no way we can really tell what kind of position you're in with the things you've said.

Brett, yes there are times I have to fly or get a rental but the rental could be an hour drive (yes I log it) and a flight for Chicago to Atlanta is two hours, lets say 4 even with checking in. However unlike traditional OTR companies I don't have to wait to be loaded, or unloaded. I pick up the brand new truck, do my walk around, sign a few papers and on my way to delivery. Some are quicker than others, some are governed some are not. Some require scale houses others do not. It's not all peaches and cream but for someone that wants to pick their hometime and make good money it's not a bad gig. There are several retired OTR drivers switching to driveaway.

I'm done with this topic now, Close it , delete it I don't care..... what started as something with a goal of being an insight to what I do and what is available to drivers out there has turned into what I feel is a personal attack....sure maybe I brought some of it on myself but not all of it. Stay safe out there.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

I read this last night, too tired to reply. Aces I cannot determine what exactly the point of all this is.

Working as a 1099 for the same company beyond 12 months is an invitation to the IRS to audit you and the company you are contracting to. As. 1099 you must consistently show multiple, different sources of income. If you have one, ask your account.

You mention a variable work schedule of for example, one week on, two weeks off. Most of us on here require or want full time employment, not something that appears to be part time work.

The biggest piece of ambiguity in your post is you are evading basic questions, like who is the company, etc. It's seems like Repo work.

Sorry, appreciate you taking the time to share all of this, but for what we are here for, it has little to no value.

What is your source that working beyond 12 months as 1099 is an invitation to the IRS? There are plenty of people that do this type of work, let alone the millions of people that work under 1099.

The work schedule is whatever you want it to be, if you want to work six weeks and take a week off you can, want to work 1 week a month because you have another job you can. That was my point.

REPO work? Most of the trucks I pick up are brand new (less than 50 miles on them) some of the trucks for ryder or penski are used but I have never repo'd anything.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

Forget about drive away, I want to hear how you made 6 figures driving tour buses (which was mentioned in a different thread, unless I misunderstood). I think it would be hard to walk away from that.

In las Vegas it is not unheard of to make six figures driving tour buses, long hours and hard work in 115 degrees isn't easy but I walked away because I left that hellhole of a city behind. The crime is so out of hand I couldn't stand reading about yet another shooting just blocks away from my house.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

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Everything I do is a tax write off, from fuel to tolls to dinner and hotels

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You said they're paying for your hotels and fuel. You can't write off stuff the company is paying for, you know that, right? If the company pays for your hotels and fuel you can't put that money in the bank and then turn around and write it off on your taxes. I mean, you can, but that's illegal. You can only write off any expenses they didn't cover, like if the hotel bill was great than their reimbursement.

Do you run a logbook?

Yes I run a legal log book, Sorry if my advice hasn't been up to par. Every company pays drivers differently, some pay fuel on a fuel card others give a fuel allowance based on the size of the vehicle you are driving (CDL vs Non CDL ) and it's up to you to find the best prices to maximize your profits, because if you go over fuel then it's on you. So in that case you can 100 percent claim it as a write off. Other companies use fuel cards and therefore it is not a write off.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

Someone asked the name of the company..... the response was "several". That is vague and does not allow others to look into it. List the several companies... otherwise you are saying "I found a great opportunity you guys may like but I'm not going to tell you how to get it for yourself"

I was more than willing to help but after all the personal "advice" I was given i'm not going to offer up anything else after this post. It's really not hard to google "drive away companies" or fleet management. But here is a short list of some of them.... Apollo- never worked for them but hear bad things Mamo- mostly brand new from the factory (upfitter) lots of rydar tractors Amerifleet- biggest in the country been around for over 30 years. mostly fleet vehicles (cars. small trucks with a few large CDL thrown in) (no cdl required for the cars, DOT physical allows you to drive up to 26000 pounds. AAA interstate- don't know much about them Bennet transport- second biggest behind Amerifleet

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

Oh, and your title of "Two Weeks ... ": is that the experience you have already? Few rookie truck drivers, who don't need to worry about their financials, with two weeks under their belt would be so confident.

look at the date of the original post

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

"Clear" means after taxes/expenses. You mentioned this is a 1099 job. That means you must pay your own Social Security/ Medicare taxes, Federal Income Tax, State Income Tax. Those will total a minimum of 30-35% of your gross. Also, you are required by Federal Law to purchase Health Insurance. Don't forget you are not covered by Workmans Comp or Unemployment benefits. As a Self Employed Contractor, you are also required to pay Quarterly Estimated Taxes. If you are not familiar with what that is, you must estimate your income for the next quarter, and pay your taxes in advance of earning that income. I sure hope you are familiar with self employment tax law. The interest and penalties add up fast! I am not trying to Dog on you, just want you to be aware of your tax liabilities as a 1099 Contractor. I know of what I speak. I have had EXPERIENCE with all of the above, and had the IRS up my a$$ and in my bank account for several years. 1099 Contractors are an easy target for the IRS. If you are aware of the above information then you are miles ahead of 90% of the people that take a 1099 position with any Company. That $1000-1200 check they write you every week can turn into $500-600 in your pocket in the end. Good Luck!

I am aware how 1099 works as I have been doing it for the better part of 15 years. Everything I do is a tax write off, from fuel to tolls to dinner and hotels, my cell phone is used for than 60% for work and is a write off. As a vet I have healthcare coverage. I carry my own workmans comp insurance in the form of a large savings account that could cover me for 2 solid years. I also work 2-3 weeks then take 2 weeks off...try doing that with a trucking company.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

I guess I misunderstood the question. So if you want to reask it feel free but to answer the question as I understand it.... I don't pay for my transportation anymore so to break it down. A box truck lets say 33000 GVWR requires a CDL I get paid 50 CPM plus all fuel (on a fuel card) all travel including rentals paid for. Every 500 miles dispatched includes 45 dollars for a hotel. If I have to get the vehicle registered or a d.o.t inspection (not a road side) then I get paid for that.

so for easy math a 1000 mile run would pay 50% once I pick of the truck so $250 dollars plus 90 dollars total for the hotels. The other 50% get paid once all paperwork is set in. lets say I didn't need to register the truck. 1000 miles is two days, I like comfort inn's so if the hotel is 65 a night I'm paying 20 a night out of pocket so my 500 becomes 460.... 30 for food ....430. if I do three runs like that in a week 430x3=1290. I hope this helps.

Posted:  3 years, 4 months ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

I work for several companies including one that pays for all transportation including flights. They even pay for me to get home and back out on the road.

Posted:  4 years, 1 month ago

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After two weeks on the road as a drive away driver I can answer questions

So when I first posted about being a drive away driver I had many questions, well after two weeks I can answer questions. If anyone has questions send me a PM and I will give my cell number is someone has several questions.

What is Drive away?

In a nutshell, any vehicle that needs to be moved from point A to point B that requires a cdl and in some cases does not.

Who do you work for?

I am 1099 independent contractor, some drivers work for several companies I'm focused on one company for now.

whats the pay?

All CDL drivers are between .50 cpm and .75 cpm depending on the truck even if it doesn't require a cdl .............non cdl drivers make .45 cpm

So it's like being an O/O?

Yes and no....the company pays for fuel/ tolls and on longer runs will pay 50 dollars a night for hotel room. If I want to take a week off I can. To stay on the company books they ask you drive 600 miles a month.

How many miles are you getting?

first week was 1800 this week 2300

How do you get paid?

You can get an advance of 275 a day and at the end of each run you submit all receipts for fuel and tolls and approved hotels. you keep the originals to claim on taxes. you receive your payment 2 days after you submit your paperwork.

How do you get from one load to another?

Lots of drivers use greyhound, rental cars (sometimes paid by company) or use a tow car.

What do you drive?

So far a Fed ex van non cdl, a 26 ft custom box truck, a firetruck, and a few sleeper cabs. The box truck had the most miles at 2000 the Van had 30 miles.

Anything else we should know?

I'm enjoying it so far, making over 1000 a week clear and there is no force dispatch so I have a say in where I go and when.

PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE SEVERAL COMPANIES DO THIS KIND OF WORK BUT DON'T PAY AS WELL AND HAVE A POOR TRACK RECORD, MY COMPANY HAS PEOPLE THAT HAVE WORKED FOR THEM FOR 15 YEARS.

Again any questions post them here and send me a pm

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Drive-away companies

Not sure if there is confusion or not on the term "drive-away". The job is basically picking up a truck (firetruck, cargo truck, semi truck cab, large bus) at point A and driving to point B. Could be 300 miles could be 2000 miles, could have a sleeper berth or not. You are 1099 so you pay for fuel and lodging if there is no sleeper berth. I have found some companies that pay 1.30 a mile down to .44 cents per mile but they pay for all expenses. It seems the way to make the most money is to buy a cheap yet reliable tow car in order to get to the next load quicker. I kinda did the yea yea head shake to the guy when he said that but when I said three weeks a month I mean take a week off per month. Just wondering if anyone here had done this type of work, I would say it can't hurt to try but I would be giving up a six figure job so I can move out of this hell hole known as sin city.

Posted:  4 years, 2 months ago

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Drive-away companies

Haven't been around in a long time, I have been driving Prevost tour buses in Las Vegas to the Grand Canyon and making money hand over fist..... however I'm sick of the crime in this city and I'm thinking of moving to Wausau, WI, I spent 4 years there and ready to go back. However because I haven't drove a tractor-trailer combo in a year and a half I'm finding it difficult to find a trucking job..... except Drive-away jobs... after doing research I have found the driver is like an O/O in that you have to pay for fuel and lodging and food.... But I talked to one guy making 65k a year working 3 week a month. Has anyone had experience in the field? will it hurt me in the trucking world in the long run?

Posted:  4 years, 9 months ago

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Pre trip at Celedon

It's true Celadon does not teach you the pre-trip. however by the time you get to the range there will be plenty of other students to help you study. I went to Celadon when we still had to stay in greenfield and bus in with 145 students....you'll be fine.

Posted:  5 years, 8 months ago

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More miles than I can shake a stick at, dirty restrooms and more.

So I know I have neglected my orientation journal with western express but that because I'm now with my flatbed trainer and have not stopped moving. We are currently on a run from Nashville to San Diego hauling truck axels.... That we had to secure in a downpour and wind and cold.... Soaked to the bone we get into the truck to find the heat not working.... Only the bunk heater. We changed and hit the road with him driving. Stopped for the night then I hit it hard the next two days. We made it to New Mexico last night and got a call that we are T calling with another driver..... I can't tell you what we will be hauling or where were heading but it's 2500 miles from where we sit currently..... And delivers Thursday morning. We are suppose to be a solo dispatch but that isn't going to happen right now. I have quickly learned the pivot point on a flatbed is different then a dry van. My trainer is amazing, he doesn't yell, he doesn't scream and most importantly he doesn't snore. Since my parents live 15 miles from our drop he is giving me a night at home after we drop. My only gripe about the truck is I'm 6'1 and have just over 18 inch of space when I'm on the top bunk. The good news is that on this long run I get to sleep on his memory foam mattress.

On a side note the entire state of New Mexico needs to hire some one to clean the restrooms. I'm at the point where I would rather pay for a shower to know I'm getting a cleaner toilet. Anyways I will check in later..... And old school if you see this I will call you later.

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Skateboarding with Western Express: The life of a flat bedder.

Brett, I will see about either snapping a few pictures or getting extras and scanning them to you.

As for the updates yesterday and today? Don't eat at the jack in the box near the hotel... Food poisoning has held me out of load securement for two days (before I get asked it has nothing to do with march madness..... Even of that's all that has been on tv I'm ready to hit the road) lucky for me, they start the class six days a week.

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Skateboarding with Western Express: The life of a flat bedder.

So I had typed out a long update only to have it not post so now a quick version.

Day 1 orientation- It was very much hurry up and wait, Drug test, physicals, reaction test, paperwork, computer paperwork. Very laid back kind of day.

Day 2 orientation- Today was the opposite of yesterday, very structured, very serious stuff including pictures that will give anyone nightmares. Long day started at 6am and finished after 6:30pm so I'm heading to bed, tomorrow starts load securement at 7am so its another long day. So far so good.

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Karma or something like it....serves him right.....

One company told us that is your hauling a HV load and you go off track they will send the police looking for you, most of the HV loads we had were smokes but weapons sound a lot more serious....so glad to hear we are sending them to mexico and not those crazy sobs in Canada rofl-2.gifrofl-2.gif

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Heck of a deal....

It won't enlarge the picture.

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Skateboarding with Western Express: The life of a flat bedder.

See also: Western Express Company Review

I don't know how often I will be able to update this blog but I will do my best for once a week minimum.

Sunday 3/16- I'm currently sitting in first class on a delta flight from CT- to Atlanta then on to Nashville. The first class ticket was cheaper then a bus ticket so who am I to complain....oh yeah I get reimbursed. I will be in Nashville around 4:45pm and head over to the hotel. Orientation starts in the morning. I realized I forgot my rain gear so amazon prime will be my friend this week. I think I may check out the Nashville music scene later this week, I'm also a foodie so "hot chicken" is on my list to try. I might give Old School a call later tonight once I get settled in, he has been awesome so far with my many questions. I think it's time for a glass of wine to help me relax.

Posted:  5 years, 9 months ago

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Karma or something like it....serves him right.....

They should have called the NSA they knew exactly where he was the whole time.

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