Profile For not4hire

not4hire's Info

  • Location:

  • Driving Status:

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    1 year, 8 months ago

not4hire's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

not4hire's Photo Gallery

Page 1 of 3

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Posted:  1 year, 1 month ago

View Topic:

The tangled web of legal marijuana and Hair tests

Thanks for pointing this out. For extra clarification, the legal limit for cdl holders is .03 whether in a cmv or personal vehicle.

No it is not. In fact, nowhere is .03 a limit for anything. The limit "when operating a CMV" is .04, otherwise it is whatever the jurisdictional limit is (.08) when operating a personal vehicle. Having a CDL has no bearing on the limits, it is ONLY while operating a CMV.

Posted:  1 year, 2 months ago

View Topic:

How old were you when you started driving truck?

Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCVB_mRIHPg

Posted:  1 year, 2 months ago

View Topic:

Do any of you go geocaching?

Be aware of your surroundings when geocaching...

Grizzly attack near Water Valley, Alta. leaves man in his 50s with serious injuries

Police said the man was geocaching alone in the Harold Creek area when the bear charged and attempted to drag him into the bush. He was able to get away from the animal and drive himself to where paramedics were called.

grizzly-bear.jpg

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

New sleeper split study

Or, they could just look north and review the Canadian information and adopt our rules. Split sleeper here is any two periods adding up to 10 hours so long as the least of which is not less than 2 hours. Simple, flexible and it works great.

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

GVW

Here is a map showing which states allow which exemption

Map of the State Recognition of the Auxiliary Power Weight Exemption

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

GVW

There are three methods of exemption: - None - Legislative - Enforcement policy

And two exemptions: - 400 lbs - 550 lbs

Because the exemption is merely suggested by the FHWA and not mandated, the exemption is up to each state. In order to be one hundred percent certain, you will need to read each state's legislation or policy. However, it is safe to assume the following: - Any such granted exemption will apply to gross, axle and bridge weights to the lesser of the exemption or the maximum weights allowed by installed components (i.e., axles, tires, etc.)

So... - Yes, the exemption applies to steer axles - Yes, the exemption applies to gross weight, so you could be 80,400-80,550 lbs legally - No, you are not overweight (theoretically or otherwise) if you have a qualifying APU in a jurisdiction that grants an exemption for such a device.

As for the OP...

Wisconsin Statutes 348.15  Weight limitations on class “A" highways.

(f) 1. In this paragraph: a. “Heavy-duty vehicle" has the meaning given in 42 USC 16104 (a) (4). b. “Idle reduction technology" has the meaning given in 42 USC 16104 (a) (5). 2. Notwithstanding pars. (a) to (c) and (g), sub. (4), and ss. 348.17 and 349.16, and subject to subd. 3., in the case of a heavy-duty vehicle equipped with idle reduction technology, the gross weight of the vehicle, and the gross weight imposed on the highway by the wheels of any one axle or axle group of the vehicle, may exceed the applicable weight limitation specified in pars. (a) to (c) or (g) or posted as provided in s. 348.17 (1) by not more than 400 pounds or the weight of the idle reduction technology, whichever is less. 3. This paragraph applies only if the heavy-duty vehicle operator, upon request, proves, by written certification, the weight of the idle reduction technology and, by demonstration or certification, that the idle reduction technology is fully functional at all times.

http://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/statutes/348/III/15

Posted:  1 year, 3 months ago

View Topic:

Logging a Roadside Breakdown

Let your conscience be your guide...

Title 49: Transportation PART 395—HOURS OF SERVICE OF DRIVERS

§395.2 Definitions.

On-duty time means...

(6) All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled commercial motor vehicle;

§395.2 Definitions.

Posted:  1 year, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Apu exemption and steer axle

Maximum allowable weights are ALWAYS the lesser of: 1) The manufacturer's maximum for the axle as noted on the door-jamb tag, 2) The manufacturer's maximum for the tires as noted on the sidewall at maximum cold inflation, or 3) The maximum allowed by legislation (including any exemption) by either total weight or weight per inch of tire width.

The APU exemption (where accepted) allows you to increase your gross, with a corresponding increase on any/all axle(s), providing you do not exceed any component limits. Therefore, anyone telling you to exceed a weight for a tagged component is wrong. However, all states allow up to 20,000 on steers providing the axles and tires are appropriately rated.

Posted:  1 year, 4 months ago

View Topic:

HOS question/advice

From what I've read in high road, at every change of duty status you must show mileage and location. It seems that the QC will, by using gps, automatically show location, and possibly mileage . So by going into off duty during heavy traffic to save drive time, couldn't you be rolling the dice. In 30 min of bumper to bumper you could go 5 miles and change cities. So how could someone take a 30 min "break", travel 5 miles and change cities? Maybe I'm being nieve but to be able to earn a few more cents by fudging logs, you're takings a risk at a fine, suspension, being fired, or losing your CDL, it is extremely pennywise and pound foolish. I describe it as stepping over a dollar to grab the nickel.

I mentioned before, I'm kind of a nerd at following rules. Don't get me wrong what you do is what you do, and non of my concern, and I rather welcome the information, but I have my own morals I have to live by. I will not lower my standards based on someone else's actions. I've heard it countless times before. "Why do I have to do it that way, when Ralph gets away with cutting corners". I say do what you know to be right, and don't worry about what Ralph does. If you start cutting corners because ralph does, you have lowered your standards because of someone else's actions. That's never good imo.

A driver can't legally take their 30 minute break while in traffic. Regardless of how long the driver is stopped, it does not meet the definition of "off-duty". Do some drivers and some companies cheat? Yes. However, the new rules for electronic logging devices (ELDs) are far more comprehensive and strict in terms of programming parameters than the old ones for automatic on-board recorders (AOBRs) and I expect the FMCSA will really crack down on their carrier audits.

In your op you asked about sources of information. If it hasn't already been pointed out to you, the best source is from the horse's mouth--the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Their rules pertain to any interstate commerce. The definition of interstate commerce is very broad, and a specific truck can be deemed to be engaging in interstate commerce even if it does not leave its home state. If you are truly engaged in only intrastate transportation, then the rules of your home state would apply. They may, or may not be the same as the federal rules.

FMCSA regulations pertaining to road transportation homepage (49 CFR Parts 300-399) On the right you will see the menu box that has links to the regulation guidance. The guidance are lay-language explanations/clarifications of some of the regulations.

PART 395—HOURS OF SERVICE OF DRIVERS

Note that sometimes you will hear something different from a driver or your carrier than what you read in the regulations. If it comes from a driver I tend to ignore it--lots of myths and fallacies are in circulation. Even drivers that supposedly "have been doing it that way for 30+ years". Besides, what better way to learn that looking things up?

If your company tells you something different it may be fine so long as it doesn't conflict with the FMCSA regulations. Company policies can add elements that are not required (like noting your activity in "remarks", i.e., "fuelling"), or they may be stricter than regulations (such as no "personal conveyance"). Be aware that not all carriers are created equal, and regardless of who tells you to do what, if you violate the rules and get caught, you will pay the price.

Posted:  1 year, 4 months ago

View Topic:

Leaving a dog in the truck

Actually having a dog let's you idle in those Nazi no idle places. They will let us die but not the dog haha.

This is not correct; there is nothing overriding anti-idling laws for your pet's health or comfort.

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

This guy says it is usually 'company policy' for dogs to be required to be fixed.

Dogs are not required to be spayed or neutered, they are required to have a rabies vaccination (unless less than three months old).

Canadian Border Services Agency: Importing or Travelling with Domestic Dogs

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

What are a truck driver's best defense against possible criminal acts against them while on duty?

The fact is I could DIE or get KILLED!

Is it too late to tell him he's gonna croak from hypertension long before anything else?

Drivers need to be worried about salt, sugar and deep vein thrombosis far more than knives, bullets and "bad hombres."

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

I Hit a bridge

17904437_1348167358598926_22179529650836

Going over can be just as bad as going under...

attachment.php?attachmentid=9027&d=11808

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Trucking company did not add me to their insurance

Heed the advice, lest you get...

download-1.jpeg?w=809

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Truck drivers with weapons permits

Your best weapon...

big-protruding-ears-with-empty-space-bet

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Drinking in the Truck.

There sure is a lot of nonsense posted in this thread.

Company policies notwithstanding--which can be stricter than FMCSA regulations--there is no prohibition against mouthwash, or similar personal hygiene products, being in a CMV. Nor is there a prohibition on any other products containing alcohol, other than those intended for human consumption; i.e., beer, wine, spirits. Do you know what air brake antifreeze is? About 90-100% alcohol.

Any legal alcohol testing method will determine the difference between momentary alcohol on your breath from mouthwash and alcohol impairment from drinking. Now, if you're drinking your mouthwash, hand sanitizer or your air brake antifreeze, you can't be helped.

There is, in fact, a time when the FMCSA specifically says you can have alcoholic drinks in the cab... when you are off-duty and transporting them from the store to your place of lodging, etc.

Guidance for § 392.5: Alcohol prohibition.

Question 3: Does the prohibition against carrying alcoholic beverages in §392.5 apply to a driver who uses a company vehicle, for personal reasons, while off-duty?

Guidance: No. For example, an owner-operator using his/her own vehicle in an off-duty status, or a driver using a company truck or tractor for transportation to a motel, restaurant, or home, would normally be outside the scope of this section.

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/title49/section/392.5

Oh, and if you're a recovering alcoholic, good for you, but keep your judgemental opinions to yourself.

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Short haul

The "local" or "short haul" exemption is a radius of 100 air miles (115 statute miles).

Yes, if you go outside that area you must start a log for that day (assuming you don't normally use a log). No, you do not have to have the previous 8 day's logs with you.

If the return flight is according to the carrier's schedule, it is considered on-duty (not driving) unless you have 8 consecutive hours off-duty afterwards, in which case it becomes off-duty. If your return is according to your own schedule it is off-duty.

DISCLAIMER: I wasn't able to find the guidance regarding the flight, so that may have been rescinded and all flights considered off-duty. Note, though, that all non-driving work (whether or not you're compensated) for a carrier is considered on-duty, so in the absence of anything else, I would follow the "8 hours off equals off-duty" rule.

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Printing on the road?

I had printers in my trucks for many years as I did a lot of cross-border and permit-related work. You can get a nice, compact, good quality inkjet for relatively cheap. The last one I had was a HP 2540 which was a print / scan /copy, wireless connectivity. I had a small plug-in inverter to power the printer in the truck. I even stopped taking my laptop and could do everything from my phone. I have let the printer freeze in northern Canadian winters and bake in south Texas summers and I have never had performance issues. Get a mainstream printer, rather than some off-brand so you can get supplies anywhere. I find the so-called "portable" printers too expensive and too unreliable... and I have used various ones as far back as about 2002.

As for the signature issue mentioned in the op; I have a scanned .jpg of my signature so I can insert it in any document without printing. Open document, insert signature, save document, return email... it takes about as long to do as it took to read that. Also, I haven't sent a fax in at least 12-15 years. Even people who insisted they needed a fax, like customs brokers, always had an email address.

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Trucker Path app and truck stop reviews

I did my best to avoid most truck stops; pop in for fuel, a shower and that's about it. I had food and storage and cooking available in my truck and I was often OS anyhow, so most truck stops were best to be avoided. Having said that, I used Trucker Path extensively.

However, there is another app, RoadBreakers, that is nothing but parking and has many, many more locations in it. It has the obvious ones as well as many non-obvious ones like hidey-holes, on-street, vacant lots, etc. It was extremely useful as, again, being OS I very often could not take my trailer off the permitted route. Plus, I could park by myself which I liked as it was generally quieter and I didn't have to worry so much about some dummy ripping off my hood.

Posted:  1 year, 5 months ago

View Topic:

Crossing to and from Canada

Additional questions-

1 - does having citizenship in both countries have an advantage?

2 - what might I expect if I wish to base from Canada and have to transfer license?

3 - could one technically live in Canada and work in the US ( or vise-versa) or would it require maintaining 2 residences?

1. It could. Cabotage refers to the transport of goods or passengers between two points within the same country by a foreign carrier. There are two components that are regulated by two separate government agencies; 1) the equipment, regulated by customs, and 2) personnel, regulated by immigration. A driver from Canada that does not possess a visa to work in the US can only deliver loads to or from the US, but not pick up a load in the US and deliver that same load within the US (except for very specific circumstances dealing with in-bond loads). Likewise, the carrier must have permission for its equipment to be used for point-to-point loads within the US. All of the foregoing also applies to US drivers and companies in Canada.

If you are a dual-citizen and you drive for a company that has full authority in both countries, then you woud have no restrictions on your ability to pick up and deliver loads to, from or within either country.

2. If you wish to transfer your license you will have to follow the rules of the jurisdiction you wish to transfer it to. In most, if not all, cases of an international transfer, you will have to re-write and re-take the driving tests.

3. Yes, assuming you are legal to do so (via either dual-citizenship, visa or beneficiary of the Jay Treaty). You would not be required to maintain two residences. Even if you are not legal to work in the foreign country, you can still be employed by a carrier from that country. So, you can be a Canadian that works for a US carrier and vise versa.

I know of one individual that lived in Canada, but picked up his loaded truck at the beginning of each turn in the US. He would make multiple deliveries in Canada and then return the truck to the US and go home, back to Canada. Likewise, an American could do the same working for a Canadian company.

Page 1 of 3

Next Page
Go To Page:    

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More