Profile For John Van Amburg

John Van Amburg's Info

  • Location:
    Boise, ID

  • Driving Status:
    Considering A Career

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    2 years ago

John Van Amburg's Bio

Male, age 52, green eyes, gray hair. American veteran of army: 71L, admin specialist. Likes to play with Trainz computer game railroad simulator as a hobby.

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Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

And you mentioned "out of work". So now my question is...how long have you been out of work and what is your work, DMV and criminal history like?

Believe it or not, some people who do not have verifiable employment consistently over the last three years do not get accepted to some companies. Some who job hopped do not get accepted. Other drivers who think a speeding ticket here or there is no big deal..soon find out that 15 mph over the speed limit is reckless driving and a very big deal preventing them from getting into the company of their choice.

Then we get to the DOT physical. High blood pressure and diabetes seem to be common issues. Anxiety and depression meds can disqualify drivers.

These are all things to be considered, as any one of them can be a hurdle. Some people think this is about choosing a company. But sometimes it's about choosing the best company that will accept you.

Different companies have different policies. For instance, one DUI can prevent you from a company--even if it was 20 years ago.

So please, if you have questions...ask. We want to help.

I have no diabetes or high blood pressure.

Posted:  1 year, 11 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

And you mentioned "out of work". So now my question is...how long have you been out of work and what is your work, DMV and criminal history like?

Believe it or not, some people who do not have verifiable employment consistently over the last three years do not get accepted to some companies. Some who job hopped do not get accepted. Other drivers who think a speeding ticket here or there is no big deal..soon find out that 15 mph over the speed limit is reckless driving and a very big deal preventing them from getting into the company of their choice.

Then we get to the DOT physical. High blood pressure and diabetes seem to be common issues. Anxiety and depression meds can disqualify drivers.

These are all things to be considered, as any one of them can be a hurdle. Some people think this is about choosing a company. But sometimes it's about choosing the best company that will accept you.

Different companies have different policies. For instance, one DUI can prevent you from a company--even if it was 20 years ago.

So please, if you have questions...ask. We want to help.

Very well. I have been on disability since 2005 and have not worked since. Chronic fatigue syndrome and sleep apnea.

I want to be honest now. I was saying simply "out of work" to avoid bring disability in to the discussion but I will be frank. It is not like I was recently fired from a job, laid off, on unemployment or quit.

My doctor said lose 100 pounds to fully restore my health and I am expected to have this disability averted and full health restored.

I figure I have about nine months to go on a strict diet and exercise regimen. I don't think most companies would discriminate on the basis of disability history. It is against the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. I do have verifiable disabilities by medical records and federal government forms. I have been living poor on the VA pension benefit since 2005.

I will also have a voc/rehab agency working for me as a client.

I don't smoke, drink or do any illegal drugs. I take no prescription meds that impair driving.

My driving record is flawless with a perfect driving record and good driver insurance discount with Farmers. I have a misdemeanor for petty theft. Not a single felony. Never a DUI/DWI.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

"I figure..."

"I figure..."

"I don't know but.."

"I would expect..."

"I would assume..."

"I have assumptions.."

Do you see the pattern here? you are guessing trucking is for you. Perhaps it is. And yes, life will be easier if you are not in a relationship as you start your journey cause the pressures of home life and homesickness can really throw a wrench into training and new solo careers.

You paid off your Toyota Corolla, good for you. I paid off my Mustang GT 5.0, and yes I park at the truck stop and have my car in storage with the battery disconnected. I get a cab and take the cat carrier with me. No big deal. I've also let my brother drive the car for awhile during winter.

Jim Palmer and Prime do have contracts together and Jim Palmer uses Prime terminals and drop yards.

I'm curious why you think JP will be a good fit. What do you know of them?

Please take a minute to re read your posts. Instead of asking questions that can give you information on improving your entrance into trucking you have repeatedly told us what you figured, assumed and expected.

Our insistence that you read the links comes from our experience and knowing that 95% of those who enter trucking fail. We want you to be one of the 5% who make it. It isn't easy and we know it.

One of the biggest reasons people fail is because they "figured, assumed, expected". If we can help you get past those unrealistic expectations before you even get started and provide you with accurate information, you have a much better chance as being the odds defying 5%.

See what I mean?

Good luck

Very good, Mrs. Rainy D.

I will indeed study all this on-line stuff. I don't have to be told that entering this field will entail major changes in my life and it is likely I won't LIKE all the changes this career brings into my life. This semi work is indeed working for a living: a job, not a Sunday park picnic or church ice cream social. It certainly can't be worse than flipping hamburgers at McDonald's for minimum wage.

The major change I am looking for is in my personal bank statements where DEPOSITS are listed every month. Larger numbers in that column will be very welcome.

My main goal in life is to get from "out of work" to "relatively richer".

What do YOU personally NOT like about trucking even though you are still going strong at it perhaps after several years?

I am sure every driver will hit things that are "not fun" in this racket sooner or later during this career.

I think the 95% who fail are mostly those who are NOT single (bachelors), wimps or spoiled brats with no work ethic.

Those with the toughness, as myself, to have entered military service and have succeeded are probably the better candidates to take the wheel of an 18-wheeler.

This is not a job for sissies, wimps or cowards.

This could have recruiting campaign appeal for American freight companies.

We are looking for a few Good Men. The Proud, the Few the American Gear-jammers.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

JVA, I read your reply to Rainys points last night. I took some time to think over my response here.

In my opinion this is not going to be the career for you. I know that you have to think of your furry friends at some point in this process. But first you need to decide if the trucking lifestyle is something you can do, or want to do.

You described what sounds like a dedicated or regional type of job. And yes it is possible for a rookie to get those types. It's just not likely. Your going to have a better shot of going OTR first. I say this because companies will want experience fir those other types. So that means you could be out on the road for 4-6 weeks at s time before you get back to your apartment. It sounds like that would be an issue for you. Again just my perception of how you responded.

Once you determine if this is a job you want and can do. Then you need to think about the life your furry pets will have on a truck. Is it the right lifestyle for them. Are they distracting to you when you drive? You can't have them for the training period, what will you do with them.

I went through the same issue with my dog, ultimately I decided it would be best for him to not join me. He needs room to run on a daily basis for hours at a time.

As a side note, I would really pay attention to the things Rainy says if your thinking of going Jim Palmer. Their training is very very similar to Primes, in which she is a trainer for.

This could still possibly work for me, sir. My brother can care for my pets for some time and has agreed to do it if push were to come to shove.

That's no problem.

If my career in a rig goes over a year, then eventually, I will want the furry animals to join me on the road. Experience/seniority has its privileges, rewards, more pay, promotions, more desirable work schedules and more responsibilities.

A confirmed bachelor, I have no immediate family of my own. I know lots of truckers make their pets work out for them on the road somehow after they get seasoned on the job. Of course, many new drivers don't want their pets to get in the way until they get settled in their career path.

I think being a bachelor is ideal for a newbie trucker. Having no wife or human babies of my own is a big qualifier right off the bat.

I am very well psyched up to do the "hardship tour": 3 - to - 6 weeks a driving session away from home sweet home. I am just cooped up in my little apartment most of the time anyway and I am making no money at it.

Yes, I do indeed expect OTR work initially as a greenhorn. It seems like standard operating procedure. That may be my only option.

I am very well aware of that.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

You are getting some good advice. First look at the links G Town gave you. Also check

Like others have said, hiring area and not terminal location matter. It seems you need to learn more about how this career works. As far as the truck getting serviced, the company takes care of that. They either route you to a terminal or arrange road service, usually with a T/A. Here's an example. I picked up a loaded trailer the other day and most of the lights were out. That puts the trailer out of service. I called our road service department and they sent someone to fix the problem. I went back to sleep. No sweat.

Some people live on large pieces of land and can take the truck and trailer home. Most find a local truck stop or business that will let them park there. Think big box stores. I am with CFI. I live in Charlotte NC. Until a few days ago I was planning to leave my truck at a local truck stop. Fortunately they gave me my home time load as a drop to a drop yard 10 minutes from my house. I did a happy dance. My tractor is now parked in my driveway. It's almost as big as my house. I got that trailer from someone who was parked behind a Target for their home time. I have a friend with the same company who parks his at a local business. As far as pets go, CFI has a pet policy. I know they require a $500.00 deposit, which they can payroll deduct over time. I don't know the size limit or quantity. I have seen drivers with big dogs down to the tiniest Chihuahuas.

I hope that helps. Good luck.

I am sure "where to park the truck" on those precious few days off will be of little worry to me. It was always my assumption that companies own or lease the real estate for this very purpose. Railroads, for example, often own or lease the train rolling stock that runs on their own tracks and own the land property as well: right-of-way, yards, buildings and terminals as well. Railroad vehicles are generally parked on the railroad's own property when not in service. The difference is that truck companies, unlike RRs, don't own the actual roads they operate on usually but one might think they usually lease or own the various buildings and lots (land) for their business use and their vehicular equipment.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

By home .. Yes some people have room in their yards or whatever. . I park my truck at a truck stop two miles away. But I know plenty of drivers who ask local businesses such as grocery stores,hotels or shopping plazas to park there.

And no, we do not conduct personal business with the trucks. I never said that. As for fuel economy, we usually have customers close to home so basically we get paid to drive to the delivery to get home. Then to the next customer to come back on the road.

I'm curious as to how many days off you are planning per month? I'm guessing you expect to come home every weekend since you said "I expect them to be serviced after every road trip"?

Yes, you asked about the dogs. Once you find a company that takes the dogs, be sure to make a list of your other demands and requirement's. Then compare.

I'd be really interested to see which company you choose.

I don't know all the little"logistics" things about trucking just yet. I don't have a whole bunch of demands but the dog policy thing is the most important over the LONG run. I am pretty flexible about most other matters. OK, even if I were to go home ONLY one weekend a month, I would still have to park my company truck "somewhere" and then drive my car, personal gear and little dogs home. I just hope my car battery doesn't go dead over the weeks-long work session from long-term not running OR I could just hire a cab (that allows two small caged pets) to take me to and from work and leave my (paid for free and clear) car at home (with a lockable cover on it) with the battery taken out, put on my back patio on a trickle charger. I would expect that the companies all have this truck parking "protocol" worked out for "whenever" drivers get off work even if it is only once a month. I will study more of Brett's reading stuff but experience will still be my best teacher when all is said and done. There are a number of ropes to learn in this job I am well aware of. I won't have my dogs with me in the beginning anyway or even want to be bothered with them starting out. A new driver's plate will be plenty full of things to deal with as it is. Certainly a soldier can't have pets in basic training for the same reason. I feel a greenhorn trucker's first year will be a sort of "boot camp": all pain, all train, all snow and rain, all discipline, no fun. Come to think of it, I could even start out with a no-pets company then transfer over to another (pet-friendly) company about a year down the road. Seasoned drivers with good records can often cut their own ticket as to whom to work for. I will get the driving job down pat first before worrying about the dogs. The dogs can very well be pet-sit at my brother's place while I am training and getting initial work experience.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

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Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

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Well, in the company's hiring area. I figure drivers generally report or commute to work from home at a TERMINAL but I could be wrong.

I would only drive for a company and not lease.

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You are wrong. Most OTR companies it doesn't matter. I'm from NJ and even though there is a terminal in PA, my home terminal is in MO. We take our trucks home so terminal.location to home doesn't matter. I got to whichever terminal I am near for trailer or truck repairs. That's it.

Well, whatever. I certainly can't park a tractor at my apartment complex anyway. My landlord simply won't allow it. It is out of the question. I plan to drive my own Corolla on days off. My car is my personal vehicle. Starting out as a newbie driver, I will definitely retain my automobile and my apartment for quite a spell at least until I am settled in that career for at least a year to become seasoned. One never knows how this new gig will work out over time. A company-owned semi truck is an occupational tool. Certainly an airline pilot doesn't fly his 747 to his home garage to commute nor does a Navy sailor sail his aircraft carrier home to his barracks after work. There's no parking for train locomotives at my apartment also. shocked.png

I don't plan to take the company truck home with me. That commercial vehicle seems just too unwieldy to park to do personal business.

I figure the company trucks have to be parked SOMEWHERE when the OTR driver gets off duty to go home. A terminal, yard or some other corporate facility. I figure they are serviced, cleaned and inspected professionally after every road trip.

And talk about fuel economy, GOOD LORD!

My thread was mainly about a pair of Chihuahuas anyway. An outfit like Jim Palmer seems to be my cup of tea!!

The more outfits I could conceivably drive with "Chico and Maria" on board for the area where I live the better, the more to pick from.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

Well, in the company's hiring area. I figure drivers generally report or commute to work from home at a TERMINAL but I could be wrong.

I would only drive for a company and not lease.

Posted:  1 year, 12 months ago

View Topic:

Name any American company that allows at least TWO small dogs

Under 10 pounds each in their trucks. Some companies allow none: others allow only one. The company must also NOT have any policy requiring spay/neuter as well.

I live in Idaho, the Pacific Northwest, so I would need a company to work for with a home terminal near where I live as well as a pet policy that accommodates my needs. I have Jim Palmer in mind, perhaps, J.B. Hunt, how about others near me?

I am willing to pay a deposit if required but a "one-dog limit" won't quite work for me. I have a male and female Chihuahua pair. Easy little compact dogs to carry as "extra baggage" for truckers.

I am a bachelor, no immediate family.

Posted:  2 years ago

View Topic:

Has anybody here had a serious medical emergency while driving?

Does anybody here know anybody here who has had a heart attack or something bad while driving a commercial truck anywhere in North America and especially in a remote area?

I am just curious as to how any driver could summon emergency medical help and how long it might take to get a response in the most rural of places any driver might be in.

I know more than one driver has had serious medical issues on the job over the history of this industry. There was a story years ago about a driver who died from a bee sting because he was allergic to bee sting and a bee got into his cab and stung him on the job.

I am not allergic to bee sting myself but I have a history of heart palpitations, chest pains, faintness and shortness of breath. Last year I did drive my car 2,500 miles, a 1995 Toyota Corolla, with good working factory air, 100,000 original miles. This was in the summer around this time of year. I drove from California, through Oregon up to Washington back down through Idaho and across the HOT 105 degree Nevada desert in broad daylight and back home safe again unscathed even with two BAD tires with some degree of tread separation!!!!!!

In short, I am NOT the least bit scared to drive my little 22-year-old Toyota across the searing Nevada desert. I have a cell phone but it might not work out in those boonies.

Perhaps, Toyota Motor Company should build Class 7/8 trucks with their same level of "famous reliability" they have had in their smaller vehicles for many decades now! My father used to tell me about big diesel trucks like Peterbilt. He said those things never have to be "messed with" (mechanically speaking) for hundreds of thousands of miles. He implied big diesel rigs were built like army tanks and navy battleships and they really should be. Perhaps, truck manufacturers should consider the potential for major lawsuits due to not building mechanically-robust vehicles and such dependability a driver can stake his life upon.

Now MEDICAL emergencies (or the potential for them to happen) are definitely NOT trivial posting topics. Anybody considering this trade should FIRST consider their overall state of health.

One more question, how much should any American company driver expect to be paid on workman's comp should he sustain a work-related disability?

I have been on W/C at least two times in the past for back injury on the job and I only received about 66% of my normal wages.

I have read Brett's literature and stuff like W/C and medical emergencies I did not seem to find there.

I swear by Toyota reliability myself. Wouldn't be caught dead in the mountains or desert without my Tundra pickup, I swear.

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