Name Any American Company That Allows At Least TWO Small Dogs

Topic 20269 | Page 1

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John Van Amburg's Comment
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Under 10 pounds each in their trucks. Some companies allow none: others allow only one. The company must also NOT have any policy requiring spay/neuter as well.

I live in Idaho, the Pacific Northwest, so I would need a company to work for with a home terminal near where I live as well as a pet policy that accommodates my needs. I have Jim Palmer in mind, perhaps, J.B. Hunt, how about others near me?

I am willing to pay a deposit if required but a "one-dog limit" won't quite work for me. I have a male and female Chihuahua pair. Easy little compact dogs to carry as "extra baggage" for truckers.

I am a bachelor, no immediate family.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Kat's Comment
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Are you looking to go company or lease? I drive for Prime, and as a company driver, they only allow one pet. Lease people can have whatever they want though.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Are you looking to go company or lease? I drive for Prime, and as a company driver, they only allow one pet. Lease people can have whatever they want though.

Having two dogs on the truck is NOT a valid reason for leasing. Please Etcha-Sketch the thought.

John Van Amburg's Comment
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Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

Well, in the company's hiring area. I figure drivers generally report or commute to work from home at a TERMINAL but I could be wrong.

I would only drive for a company and not lease.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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When I was in school earlier this year one company came in saying you can have 2 or 3 dogs totaling up to 100 pounds dont hold me to it but I think it was US Express.

Eric G.'s Comment
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Jim palmer out of Missoula Montana. They have the three heartbeat policy. 2 people one pet, or child. 1 person two pets, etc.

This may have changed, but it's what I saw when I was researching them.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

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Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

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Well, in the company's hiring area. I figure drivers generally report or commute to work from home at a TERMINAL but I could be wrong.

I would only drive for a company and not lease.

You are wrong. Most OTR companies it doesn't matter. I'm from NJ and even though there is a terminal in PA, my home terminal is in MO. We take our trucks home so terminal.location to home doesn't matter. I got to whichever terminal I am near for trailer or truck repairs. That's it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

John Van Amburg's Comment
member avatar

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Terminal location means absolutely nothing. As long as you are in a company's hiring area, you're good.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Well, in the company's hiring area. I figure drivers generally report or commute to work from home at a TERMINAL but I could be wrong.

I would only drive for a company and not lease.

double-quotes-end.png

You are wrong. Most OTR companies it doesn't matter. I'm from NJ and even though there is a terminal in PA, my home terminal is in MO. We take our trucks home so terminal.location to home doesn't matter. I got to whichever terminal I am near for trailer or truck repairs. That's it.

Well, whatever. I certainly can't park a tractor at my apartment complex anyway. My landlord simply won't allow it. It is out of the question. I plan to drive my own Corolla on days off. My car is my personal vehicle. Starting out as a newbie driver, I will definitely retain my automobile and my apartment for quite a spell at least until I am settled in that career for at least a year to become seasoned. One never knows how this new gig will work out over time. A company-owned semi truck is an occupational tool. Certainly an airline pilot doesn't fly his 747 to his home garage to commute nor does a Navy sailor sail his aircraft carrier home to his barracks after work. There's no parking for train locomotives at my apartment also. shocked.png

I don't plan to take the company truck home with me. That commercial vehicle seems just too unwieldy to park to do personal business.

I figure the company trucks have to be parked SOMEWHERE when the OTR driver gets off duty to go home. A terminal, yard or some other corporate facility. I figure they are serviced, cleaned and inspected professionally after every road trip.

And talk about fuel economy, GOOD LORD!

My thread was mainly about a pair of Chihuahuas anyway. An outfit like Jim Palmer seems to be my cup of tea!!

The more outfits I could conceivably drive with "Chico and Maria" on board for the area where I live the better, the more to pick from.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

John reading your reply concerns me a bit. Your expectations might be a bit askew...such as when you park your truck at a terminal , unless there is an issue or it's due for a PM no servicing, washing or ispections of any kind will occur. When you return to it days later, it will be exactly as you left it.

I strongly suggest investing some time in these three links before going too much further.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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