Profile For RealDiehl

RealDiehl's Info

  • Location:
    Woodstown, NJ

  • Driving Status:
    Experienced Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    3 years, 10 months ago

RealDiehl's Bio

No Bio Information Was Filled Out. Must be a secret.

RealDiehl's Photo Gallery Group 1 of 5

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Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

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Game: Guess the State

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I added a little hint in the second photo. If you've been through here, you've seen these signs.

Posted:  1 month, 1 week ago

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Team driving - how Kroger sees it.

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Great find, Errol! That is an accurate take on team driving. Who wants to sign up?

Posted:  1 month, 2 weeks ago

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CFI Reviews?

Another thing to consider, Melissa, is whether you would like to train new drivers. Prime pays their trainers extremely well. We have a long training period (30,000 miles). It is very rewarding. Not only financially but, it also feels great to teach a new driver how to succeed in this industry. Just something else to factor into your decision depending upon whether you think you might want to train new drivers in the future.

Also, to be honest, Prime pays more per mile but, reefers tend to get fewer miles on average than dry van drivers. This is bc wait times to get loaded/unloaded tend to be longer. Thus it eats into your available drive hours, meaning you will have fewer hours available to drive. This is especially true when you first go solo and your clock management skills are still being developed.

You can't go wrong really with either choice. You are the biggest factor in your success no matter what company you drive for. I hope this takes some stress out of the decision making process for you...knowing that neither choice will make or break your career. Good luck!

Posted:  1 month, 3 weeks ago

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A couple of questions from a newbie

Roehl is known for their 7 on 7 off schedule, could look there too, OP.

This is from Roehl's website. I actually spoke with a recruiter from Roehl recently. He said that for the national fleet (they usually don't go west of I-35) you can earn 7 days home by staying out for 36 days. His name is Joe (715-591-7201). Give him a call if you want more info.

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Posted:  2 months ago

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Game: Perspective Test

IDK...Southern California?🤣

Not quite sure what kind of answer you are looking for. A description of everything in the photo? That would require a lot of typing. Too lazy for that.

Does it look like a truck can pass through there? I'd say yes. Looks like the path narrows as it gets further away in the photo. Maybe that is due to perspective?

Posted:  2 months ago

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Still researching the different training options

Spunkybubbles🤔 I want to hear someone say that over the CB just once. It would make my dayrofl-3.gif

The type of online training you are asking about is available right here High Road CDL Training Program

This is specifically designed to help you pass the CDL permit tests. The permit test is all knowledge-based. No skills to master beforehand. Once you have your permit, then you can move onto actually learning the skills you need to pass the CDL tests (driving, backing, pre trip inspection). Some schools require you to have your permit before attending. Others offer classes to help you obtain your permit before moving onto ""the hands on driving training part".

As Errol noted above, any school you attend will teach you only what you need to pass the CDL test. Learning the actual job requires additional training. Many companies offer paid training. Paid CDL Training Programs Apply For Paid CDL Training

Posted:  2 months ago

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How many of you quit trucking?

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I think the prime who "quit trucking" aren't in this form to answer.

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I'm trying to picture Brett creating a subforum on here for drivers who have quit the profession. Im not talking about people who retire or need to move on for personal reasons. I mean the terminal rats who decided the profession sucked and was stacked against them within their first 2 weeks solo.

Posted:  2 months ago

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How many of you quit trucking?

Hello and welcome.

In regards to your question, I advise you to tread lightly sir.

Some may consider it an attempt to rally the silent, disgruntled minority, or to simply start some sht. I guarantee nobody here thinks their decision to get a CDL or the business in general is a joke.

I like to give new folks the benefit of the doubt... Can you maybe explain what you're interest is? Are you looking to become a driver? Are you trying to prove or disprove some rumors you might have heard? Please share what your interest is. It will help you get more answers.

Rest assured, if you are serious about seeking truth and knowledge, you have come to the right place.

Posted:  2 months ago

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Work Zone Speed Limits

I've noticed more construction this year already than I can recall seeing in years past.

Yeah, man! Seems like a whole lot of construction. Eastern WY especially is nothing but single lanes for large sections of 80.

Posted:  2 months ago

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Work Zone Speed Limits

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I guess we've all seen this kind of sign, or something similar. What do you think is the correct way to adjust your speed when you see this prior to entering a work zone?

Let's say it is the middle of the night (I guess it could be anytime though). One lane is closed and cones/barrels are lining the dotted line. There are clearly no workers present. Do you slow down and obey the posted speed? Or do you continue driving along at 60 or 65 (whatever the regular speed limit was)?

Some signs give a speed limit that says "when flashing". If the sign is not flashing but, you are clearly entering a construction zone with a lane closure, do you adjust your speed?

I just want to see what other drivers do in these circumstances.

Posted:  2 months ago

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For Whom the Bell Tolls

That is a horrible thing to have to witness, even after the fact. I highly respect that you were willing to offer any help you could. It takes a brave person to approach a scene like that and try to help. Were you a first responder of some kind before you started driving?

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Nearly Involved In Accident Today

Glad you are okay! You did the right thing by slowing down like you did. I've had my share of close calls over the years. You just can't live out on the road like we do and not come across some trouble now and then. We have to be diligent and careful anytime something is amiss.

Ha-ha! I was writing as you posted. Good timing. And you pretty much said what I was thinking😉

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Nearly Involved In Accident Today

This is no doubt the closest I've been to witnessing or being involved in an accident. There is no time to really think about how to steer around it or how hard to break or look around to see if you can switch lanes. I guess that is why it is important to stay aware constantly of everything around you and try to imagine what your options are in case of an accident, before there is an accident.

I think I remember Old School saying that he plays a mental game of what if. That way he is ready to react if something goes wrong.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Nearly Involved In Accident Today

I-70 eastbound in Western Colorado, around 0500 this morning. I came around a sharp curve and was met by a very thick cloud of smoke. I knew it wasn't fog bc the smoke was very dark. My first thought was "It's a rock slide" (lots of steep, rocky walls on the side of the road). I slowed down quickly. I didn't slam the breaks hard enough for a critical event.

When I broke through the smoke screen I glimpsed a car spun out on the right side of the road and in front of me there was all sorts of debris strewn across both lanes. I ran over pieces of the shattered vehicle and felt something dragging under my truck. I pulled over a couple hundred yards later to find the hood of the car wedged beneath my drive tires.

Police arrived almost immediately. It turns out the car was stolen and the driver was trying to get away before losing control and crashing.

The police report and subsequent inspection shows no violations or fault on my part. The crew that came out to clear the wreckage were able to get the hood pulled from under my truck by having me roll my front drive tires up onto some cribbing they laid down for me. No damage to the truck.

Driver of the car was taken away in an ambulance. Don't know what kind of condition she was in, but the vehicle was mangled.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Prime Inc is disabling Manual Mode on their trucks with the D12 Manual Automatic Transmission !

Noob question: if the manual mode is disabled and you're descending steeper grades in snow or rain w/o jakes, won't it keep trying to shift to higher gears on you as the truck accelerates?

I'd read about making sure to be in the correct gear for the grade from ahead of time to avoid accelerating too fast and burning up the service brakes.

Yes. It will IF you are going too fast as you start down that hill. This is where driving the appropriate speed for conditions is vital. It is all about momentum.

If you begin descending the hill at 50mph (depending on how steep it is), you are going to need to use your service break frequently in order to keep the truck from going too fast. This is dangerous as it could cause the breaks to fade (overheat).

If you begin your descent at 30mph, the truck has less momentum and you will not be required to hit the breaks as often in order to maintain a safe speed. It takes practice and experience to learn the correct speed to descend hills at various weights and speeds, and in various conditions.

Posted:  2 months, 1 week ago

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Prime Inc is disabling Manual Mode on their trucks with the D12 Manual Automatic Transmission !

Like Errol said, you have to reduce speed and then set the engine break. I've found that with a heavy load and a steep grade, the Jake's aren't able to maintain speed over 60mph (with descent control engaged too). There is too much momentum. But, when you use the service break and go below 60, the engine automatically shifts into a lower gear and the RPMs shoot up to the 2300-2400 range.

For me the "sweet spot" is between 50 and 53mph, engine break level 3, and descent control engaged. This works to keep you at a steady speed without hitting the service break at all on most grades 6% or less. Moreover, the RPMs will stay under 2,000.

I'm sure most drivers know that it is important to use the service break initially in order to reduce momentum before applying the Jakes on steep grades. After that, with the cruise set (descent control) you should be able to cruise down a hill at a consistent speed without touching anything.

Posted:  2 months, 2 weeks ago

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How does per diem work at Prime INC?

I've seen people on the FB page advertising to attract drivers to drive their trucks. Many of them I've seen offer a higher cpm than what a new company driver makes. With Primes per diem you actually make less CPM. The difference is made up in untaxed per diem pay.

Just ask your trainer to explain to you whether or not he's factoring per diem into what he's paying you in CPM. Also make sure you are still eligible for fuel, safety, and wellness bonuses.

Some folks advertise that they will split detention pay. Keep that in mind as well. If you sit at a shipper for 5 hours, not making money, you may have to split the detention pay you are owed with the truck's owner. Again, that might be factored into why he is offering a higher CPM rate. You will have to do the math to figure out if it is worth it.

Posted:  2 months, 2 weeks ago

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Today's route takes me through WY

Went through there yesterday, heading West on 80 in the wee hours of the morning. Conditions were good. Went over Donner Pass last night about 4 hours after a magnitude 4.7 earthquake hit the Truckee/Lake Tahoe region. Traffic was not affected. I didn't even know until this morning that an earthquake had hit the area.

Posted:  2 months, 2 weeks ago

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In today's episode of "what makes people look down on truck drivers"

He obviously came here all full of himself as a freshly squozed wannabe supertrucker, expecting like-minded individuals to validate his lookdownuponedness trait.

Instead he got the truth.

I don't know how he can reconcile this:

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You can also bet that everyone who pulled in that late morning formed a negative opinion of the driver

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with the fact that practically every top-tier driver here literally saw nothing wrong.

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A self-righteous judgement often tells more about the person doing the judging than the one being judged.

*lookdownuponedness

A game of Scrabble during family game night at the Turtle household must be some next level stuff!!!

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