Profile For Andrey

Andrey's Info

  • Location:
    DERRY, NH

  • Driving Status:
    Rookie Solo Driver

  • Social Link:

  • Joined Us:
    1 year, 9 months ago

Andrey's Bio

I was born and grew up in Russia, then came to Texas as soon as I could. Now we live in New Hampshire. My parents told me that when I was a few years old I would stop near every truck and say: "I'll get in the seat, and drive." Well, I am 50 now, and I have to say, that nothing changed - I still want to get in the seat and drive.

Andrey's Photo Gallery

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Posted:  10 minutes ago

View Topic:

Company CDL school tuition

whatever you can afford, but get it paid off ASAP.

Yes, that makes perfect sense. I hear the voice of majority, and I agree. I will need to reread the contract, and work with Roehl on some financial plan.

Posted:  3 hours, 33 minutes ago

View Topic:

Company CDL school tuition

You owe Roehl $6500, because the story of how you got fired sounds fishy to anyone who’s experienced a preventable at their starter company.

Doesn't really matter how it sounds, Roehl has tested me three times (for CDL, after a month with a trainer, and before giving me a truck) and had enough time and information to decide whether they want to employ me or not. Incidents and even accidents happen all the time, especially at the beginning, I can hardly imagine a driver who has never had a single incident in his career... On my side, I was ready to keep driving for Roehl, if needed, take any additional training, but I had no intention to break my word - I committed to driving 120k mi, and I stand by that. If Roehl wants tuition money back, they will have to rehire me, this is the only solution I see.

Posted:  3 hours, 40 minutes ago

View Topic:

Company CDL school tuition

The terms of the contract are drive for x amount of miles or pay us back.

So if the company goes bankrupt, sells all it's trucks and stops moving freight, it can still ask for tuition? Doesn't make any sense to me.

Posted:  3 hours, 43 minutes ago

View Topic:

Company CDL school tuition

CRST wouldn't have RELEASED you to drive for ANYONE else..until the 7.5k (guesstimate?) was paid, in full.

That's weird. If someone is fired, he is no longer under any contracts, isn't is so? And if he is under a contract, that means he can drive and earn?

Posted:  1 day, 12 hours ago

View Topic:

Company CDL school tuition

Most companies that offer CDL training require some pay back - it can be a commitment to drive certain time, or certain distance. That makes perfect sense, because companies invest in their prospective drivers, and there is no free cheese as we all know. This is the reason why all trainees sign a contract. But what are these companies' obligations? It is definitely not only training, they need to provide at least two other things, i. e. a truck and some fright, otherwise new CDL holders will simply be unable to do their part of the contract. Now, if a new driver simply walks away, he violates the contract, that is clear. But what if a company breaks a contract? For example, doesn't give a truck? And if a company fires a driver, who is willing to drive for the company, does it mean that the contract is void? All these questions are closely related to my personal situation: my employment was terminated after three months, and shortly after that I received a $6500 bill. On the one hand, this company invested in me quite a bit (lodging, fuel, rentals, CDl training, etc.), on the other hand it was not my decision to turn in the truck. Did anyone have to deal with a similar situation?

Posted:  2 days, 14 hours ago

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Local driving is so good!

You have no control over unload time; sometimes consignees are quick, other's may be as slow as molasses straight from the freezer [...] the only negative I see is dependent on how quickly the consignee unloads the trailer.

It all depends on how a local company operates. Apparently, my schedule is different - I leave the terminal fully loaded and have 5-10 deliveries, once I am done, my tablet receives a few pickups, all in the same area. Loads are usually 1-5 pallets, and I have a full control over time. Once I back into a door and come in, I can either let dock people do their job with a forklift or grab my pallet jack and take the load from the trailer myself. Either way literally takes minutes. And in rare cases when they tell to wait (even 15 minutes), I call my manager and he tells me to leave. The OT unfortunately starts only after 50, though...

Posted:  3 days, 14 hours ago

View Topic:

Local driving is so good!

I started driving for a local LTL company this Monday. So far I am very glad. The biggest difference for me is how there is no need to deal with dock people, always waiting for a door, and then for loading/unloading. I don't know, maybe it is a local New England thing, but 100% of time I drive to the dock, back into any available door, walk in, open my trailer door (yes, it is a roll up door), and then either let someone use their fork lift, or use my pallet jack myself. Stops are therefore about 5-10 minutes each. It does get complicated sometimes to drive through these tiny skinny towns, but why not view it as a free chance to practice? :-) Backing is sometimes tough too, a lot of these warehouses were probably built before first trucks hit local roads... Overall, I like this job much more than my previous regional 5-2.

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Posted:  5 days, 14 hours ago

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Getting ready to go Roehl

Congratulations! And good luck with your phase 2!

Posted:  5 days, 14 hours ago

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Pre trip

Understanding is always helpful, but plain memorizing will do the trick just fine. You have to learn by heart two things - which parts of the truck and trailer to talk about, and what exactly to say about each part. If you remove all the repetitions, you'll have to deal only with one page of text.

Posted:  1 week, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Choosing between two local companies

Any updates, Andrey?

The general consensus here and among other people I asked was that a bigger company is better, so I decided to follow this advice. Right know I am waiting for the drug test results, they are doing some paperwork. I haven't started driving yet, so there is no much to tell... It is good to have some extra time, I am finishing an addition to our chicken coop - to keep baby chicks separated from the older birds :-)

Posted:  2 weeks ago

View Topic:

Job history question

You need only three years of work history (more if you drove commercial vehicles), and if I understand it correctly, it is not a matter of working or not working that is important for companies, but rather periods of time which you cannot describe properly. SSDI is a legitimate source of income, I don't think you'll have problems with it.

I have been on SSDI,( SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ) for the past ten years. I am now beginning to try get back to work. Will a company be willing to hire me having not worked for 12yrs? (Two years to get SSDI)

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Choosing between two local companies

When you say 10 to 12 stops. What do you mean exactly? What will you be hauling?

Anything, no hazmat though, since I don't have an endorsement yet. About 80% are businesses (furniture, hardware, construction, etc.), the rest is residential, I'll have to drop pallet on driveways with a jack.

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Choosing between two local companies

Andrey, I have a few serious questions for you. Do you want to drive OTR some day?

I may have written somewhere, but don't remember. I never wanted to drive real OTR (>2 weeks), in fact, I decided to go with Roehl mostly because it was the only company that offered a regional (5 days) job straight after training. I fully agree with the concept of OTR as the best way to gain experience, it is just not my ideal lifestyle... I can imagine myself enjoying it some 25 years ago, but today I prefer to sleep every night at home and with my wife next to me. So I looked at being away from home for a while just as a necessary step of getting a local job, that was my initial goal.

The other question is, "Have you considered what will happen to your new trucking career if you have an accident at one of these jobs?" It is imperative that you be extra careful.

Accidents do happen, but my accident-free 30+ years of driving make me confident enough. Yes, driving a semi is different from a sedan, but still there is a lot in common, especially when it comes to actual driving, not backing into the dock which is a completely different skill.

I still would encourage you to seek out another company that will allow you to be OTR until you can establish some legitimate experience.

I would probably do that if I found a company ready to assign me a truck without going out with a trainer for a month again. I did it once, and do not want to do it again. I did make quite a few calls, nobody would do that. So the only option to keep driving was start looking for something local. I am aware of all the minuses, the biggest of which is probably my NE region with NY, Boston and other nasty places. Hopefully, my FM would allow me to stay for a while on some quite local roads before jumping into those big cities...

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Choosing between two local companies

Do either of them involve going into or south of Boston?

Both cover full Mass, so I assume that includes Boston :-(

Posted:  2 weeks, 1 day ago

View Topic:

Choosing between two local companies

I had road tests at several local companies, and got offers. I narrowed it down to two companies, and I would appreciate any advice helping me to make a right choice. Company A has about 300 trucks and 7 terminals. All trucks are auto, 2018-2018, all repairs are done in-house. Work hours are M-F, 8am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 50, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $26. Company B is much smaller, it has 8 trucks, 2015-2018, all 10 speed, they do paper logs, work hours are M-Th, 8-10am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 40, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $23. Both companies are 20 minutes from my home. I liked the owner at the smaller company, it does look like a family business. I also like the chance to drive a manual truck. I am not so sure about their maintenance though...

Posted:  2 weeks, 2 days ago

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Local driving: new trends

I wish you luck, and would probably look for a night driving local gig first, if you're determined to go this route.

Thank you. I am not a night person, otherwise I agree, it makes a lot of sense. And yes, I have no illusions about my entry level options, but that's OK, this is how things work in this life. And in general I am good at climbing up to the top of the barrel :-) It just takes some time...

Posted:  2 weeks, 2 days ago

View Topic:

Trying to get myself in sync

I'll second on yogurt. My favorite is Chobani.

Posted:  2 weeks, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Things Are Bad, Running Out of Time

The problem is I wind up way in the wrong place even knowing this

Can it be that you are moving back so fast that you do not have enough time to realize that you are heading in the wrong direction? Have you tried to slow down?

Posted:  2 weeks, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Things Are Bad, Running Out of Time

Eugene, I will tell you two things that may look silly and even wrong but they are not, and for a very simple reason - at the beginning my backing was poor and I struggled (just like you and everybody else), but now I can do it every time, which means that my approach works. Here is the deal. 1) Nerves have nothing to do with the movement of your trailer - it always follows the path set by your steering wheel at a pace set by your accelerator and brake pedal. 2) Setup doesn't really matter that much. Think for yourself - setups are unique and different every time, but the trailer ends up in the same position between two other trailers. Now, with these two core ideas in mind, think of steering to the right as a way to make things faster, and steering to the left as a way to make it slower. Position you trailer anywhere between 0 and 90 degrees, and start slowly backing. It doesn't matter how many degrees you turn to the right. Keep the wheel straight if you want, just do it slow and make sure you have enough room. Then if your left rear corner of the trailer goes towards the left trailer too fast, slow down (turn left), if it goes too slow, add some speed (turn right). Once you are in the hole and almost straight, pull up and finish your backing. Give it a try, you will not be disappointed!

Posted:  2 weeks, 3 days ago

View Topic:

Local driving: new trends

I heard it more than once, and I completely agree with a view of OTR driving as the best way to get experience. Companies are most flexible with their requirements when they hire OTR drivers, and for the vast majority of local positions applicants need 1-5 years (some say 6 months). And now comes my personal and very recent experience. I have a clean valid class A license, but only 5 months of combined (school, training, and solo driving) experience. After I was fired by my company for an incident at a customer's parking lot I had a choice: look for a regional position at some other company or try to get a local job with my very limited experience. After a few days of research, emailing and calling it became clear that any regional job means another month on the road with a trainer. I did it once, and to tell the truth, didn't like it very much - don't get me wrong, I had a good trainer, it was sharing the cab that I disliked most. So I started applying for local jobs, honestly stating that my experience is less than a year. And to my surprise, most of these companies were ready to schedule a road test for me! Today I passed such a test at one company and was offered a local M-F 10 hr job with benefits, and I have two more appointments this week to decide which company to work for. Probably there is indeed a shortage of drivers, at least in New Hempshire...

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