9.5 Bulk Packaging Markings, Loading and Unloading

The glossary at the end of this section gives the meaning of the word “bulk.” Cargo tanks are bulk packagings permanently attached to a vehicle. Cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them. Portable tanks are bulk containers not permanently attached to a vehicle. The product is loaded or unloaded while the portable tanks are off the vehicle. Portable tanks are then put on a vehicle for transportation. There are many types of cargo tanks in use. The most common cargo tanks are MC406 for liquids and MC331 for gases.

Markings

You must display the ID number of the hazardous materials on portable tanks and cargo tanks and other bulk packagings (such as dump trucks). ID numbers are in column 4 of the Hazardous Materials Table. When required by Regulation Section 172.332(a), identification number markings must be displayed on orange panels or placards as specified in this section, or on white square-on-point configuration. Specification cargo tanks must show re-test date markings.

Portable tanks also must show the lessee or ownerʼs name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides. The letters of the shipping name must be at least 2-inches tall on portable tanks with capacities of more than 1,000 gallons and 1-inch tall on portable tanks with capacities of less than 1,000 gallons. The ID number must appear on each side and each end of a portable tank or other bulk packaging that holds 1,000 gallons or more and on two opposing sides, if the portable tank holds less than 1,000 gallons. The ID numbers must still be visible when the portable tank is on the motor vehicle. If they are not visible, you must display the ID number on both sides and ends of the motor vehicle.

Test Your Knowledge

  1. Around which five hazard classes must you never smoke?
  2. Which three hazard classes should not be loaded into a trailer that has a heater/air conditioner unit?
  3. Should the floor liner required for Division 1.1 or 1.2 (Explosives A) be nonferrous?
  4. At the shipper's dock you are given a shipping paper for 100 cartons of battery acid. You already have 100 pounds of dry Silver Cyanide on board. What precautions do you have to take?
  5. Name a hazard class that uses transport indexes to determine the amount that can be loaded in a single vehicle?

Study sections 2.4, 2.5, and 2.6 if you can't answer all of these questions.

Tank Loading

The person in charge of loading and unloading a cargo tank must be sure a qualified person is always watching. The person watching the loading or unloading must:

  • Be alert.
  • Have a clear view of the cargo tank and delivery hose.
  • Be within 25 feet of the tank.
  • Know of the hazards of the materials involved.
  • Know the procedures to follow in an emergency.
  • Be authorized to move the cargo tank and able to do so.

Close all manholes and valves before moving a tank of hazardous materials, no matter how small the amount in the tank or how short the distance. Manholes and valves must be closed to prevent leaks.

Flammable Liquids

Turn off your engine before loading or unloading any flammable liquids. Only run the engine if needed to operate a pump. Ground a cargo tank correctly before filling it through an open filling hole. Ground the tank before opening the filling hole, and maintain the ground until after closing the filling hole.

Compressed Gas

Keep liquid discharge valves on a compressed gas tank closed except when loading and unloading. Unless your engine runs a pump for product transfer, turn it off when loading or unloading. If you use the engine, turn it off after product transfer before unhooking the hose. Unhook all loading/unloading connections before coupling, uncoupling or moving a chlorine cargo tank. Always chock trailers and semitrailers to prevent motion when uncoupled from the power unit.

The written exam frequently asks about Cargo Tanks so you should memorize its' definition as well as how it differs from Portable Tanks. The most important thing to remember is that Cargo Tanks are permanently attached to a vehcile.
You'll need to know what a Portable Tank is and how it differs from a Cargo Tank. The most important thing to remember is that Portable Tanks are not permanently attached to a vehicle. Rather, they are loaded and unloaded while the tank is not attached to any vehicle, than loaded onto a vehicle for transportation later.

While you should be familiar with everything in the previous two paragraphs, the most important info to remember is:

  • You must display the ID number of the hazardous materials on portable tanks and cargo tanks and other bulk packagings.
  • Portable tanks also must show the lessee or ownerʼs name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides.
A qualified person must be physically watching the entire process of a tank being loaded or unloaded.
Many people are asked about this when they take their written exam. Whoever is watching the tank being loaded or unloaded must be within 25 feet of the tank.
While loaded or unloaded flammable liquids, the tank must be grounded. You may be asked about this on the written exam.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

What are Cargo Tanks?
  • Any of these are considered Cargo Tanks
  • A series of portable containers
  • Removable tanks attached to a chassis
  • Bulk packaging permanently attached to a vehicle

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Cargo tanks are bulk packagings permanently attached to a vehicle. Cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them.

Next
In addition to the shipping name, portable tanks must also display:
  • The weight of the product including the tank
  • The destination of the cargo
  • The number of gallons being held
  • The lessee or owner's name

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Portable tanks also must show the lessee or owner's name and display the shipping name of the contents on two opposing sides. The letters of the shipping name must be at least 2-inches tall on portable tanks with capacities of more than 1,000 gallons and 1-inch tall on portable tanks with capacities of less than 1,000 gallons. The ID number must appear on each side and each end of a portable tank or other bulk packaging that holds 1,000 gallons or more and on two opposing sides, if the portable tank holds less than 1,000 gallons. The ID numbers must still be visible when the portable tank is on the motor vehicle. If they are not visible, you must display the ID number on both sides and ends of the motor vehicle.

Prev
Next
What is true about cargo tanks?
  • Cargo tanks are only used for solid products
  • They can be loaded or unloaded while attached to the vehicle or removed from the vehicle
  • They are loaded and unloaded after being removed from the vehicle
  • They remain on the vehicle while they are loaded and unloaded

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The glossary at the end of this section gives the meaning of the word "bulk." Cargo tanks are bulk packagings permanently attached to a vehicle. Cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them. Portable tanks are bulk containers not permanently attached to a vehicle. The product is loaded or unloaded while the portable tanks are off the vehicle. Portable tanks are then put on a vehicle for transportation. There are many types of cargo tanks in use. The most common cargo tanks are MC406 for liquids and MC331 for gases.

Prev
Next
ID names on cargo tanks can be displayed on:
  • White square-on-point configuration
  • ID names can be placed on any of these
  • Orange panels
  • Placards

Quote From The CDL Manual:

You must display the ID number of the hazardous materials on portable tanks and cargo tanks and other bulk packagings (such as dump trucks). ID numbers are in column 4 of the Hazardous Materials Table. When required, identification number markings must be displayed on orange panels or placards as specified in this section, or on white square-on-point configuration. Specification cargo tanks must show re-test date markings.

Prev
Next
How is a portable tank different from a cargo tank?
  • Portable tanks are loaded or unloaded while off the vehicle and cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them
  • Portable tanks and cargo tanks are the same and simply have two different names
  • Portable tanks are loaded or unloaded while on the vehicle while cargo tanks are loaded or unloaded while off the vehicle
  • None of these answers are correct

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Cargo tanks are bulk packagings permanently attached to a vehicle. Cargo tanks remain on the vehicle when you load and unload them. Portable tanks are bulk containers not permanently attached to a vehicle. The product is loaded or unloaded while the portable tanks are off the vehicle. Portable tanks are then put on a vehicle for transportation. There are many types of cargo tanks in use. The most common cargo tanks are MC406 for liquids and MC331 for gases.

Prev
Next
The person watching the loading or unloading of a tank must be within how many feet of the tank?
  • Within 25 feet
  • No closer than 100 feet
  • Within 75 feet
  • Within 50 feet

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The person in charge of loading and unloading a cargo tank must be sure a qualified person is always watching. The person watching the loading or unloading must:

  • Be alert.
  • Have a clear view of the cargo tank and delivery hose.
  • Be within 25 feet of the tank.
  • Know of the hazards of the materials involved.
  • Know the procedures to follow in an emergency.
  • Be authorized to move the cargo tank and able to do so.
Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[4,4,4,2,1,1]
6

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