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9.7 Hazardous Materials - Emergencies (continued)

Responses to Specific Hazards

Class 1 (explosives):

If your vehicle has a breakdown or accident while carrying explosives, warn others of the danger. Keep bystanders away. Do not allow smoking or open fire near the vehicle. If there is a fire, warn everyone of the danger of explosion.

Remove all explosives before pulling apart vehicles involved in a collision. Place the explosives at least 300 feet from the vehicles and occupied buildings. Stay a safe distance away.

Class 2 (compressed gases):

If compressed gas is leaking from your vehicle, warn others of the danger. Only permit those involved in removing the hazard or wreckage to get close. You must notify the shipper if compressed gas is involved in any accident.

Unless you are fueling machinery used in road construction or maintenance, do not transfer a flammable compressed gas from one tank to another on any public roadway.

Class 3 (flammable liquids):

If you are transporting a flammable liquid and have an accident or your vehicle breaks down, prevent bystanders from gathering. Warn people of the danger. Keep them from smoking.

Never transport a leaking cargo tank farther than needed to reach a safe place. Get off the roadway if you can do so safely. Do not transfer flammable liquid from one vehicle to another on a public roadway except in an emergency.

Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizing materials):

If a flammable solid or oxidizing material spills, warn others of the fire hazard. Do not open smoldering packages of flammable solids. Remove them from the vehicle if you can safely do so. Also, remove unbroken packages if it will decrease the fire hazard.

Class 6 (poisonous materials and infectious substances):

It is your job to protect yourself, other people and property from harm. Remember that many products classed as poison also are flammable. If you think a Division 2.3 (poisonous gases) or Division 6.1 (poisonous materials) might be flammable, take the added precautions needed for flammable liquids or gases. Do not allow smoking, open flame or welding. Warn others of the hazards of fire, inhaling vapors or coming in contact with the poison.

A vehicle involved in a leak of Division 2.3 (poisonous gases) or Division 6.1 (poisonous materials) must be checked for stray poison before being used again.

If a Division 6.2 (infectious substances) package is damaged in handling or transportation, you should immediately contact your supervisor. Packages that appear to be damaged or shows signs of leakage should not be accepted.

Class 7 (radioactive materials):

If radioactive material is involved in a leak or broken package, tell your dispatcher or supervisor as soon as possible. If there is a spill, or if an internal container might be damaged, do not touch or inhale the material. Do not use the vehicle until it is cleaned and checked with a survey meter.

Class 8 (corrosive materials):

If corrosives spill or leak during transportation, be careful to avoid further damage or injury when handling the containers. Parts of the vehicle exposed to a corrosive liquid must be thoroughly washed with water. After unloading, wash out the interior as soon as possible before reloading.

If continuing to transport a leaking tank would be unsafe, get off the road. If safe to do so, try to contain any liquid leaking from the vehicle. Keep bystanders away from the liquid and its fumes. Do everything possible to prevent injury to others.

While this specifically references explosives, this statement can be applied to any hazardous materials emergency. Always warn others of the danger.
Once again, we see that you should warn others of the danger. This is a very important step when dealing with a hazardous materials emergency.
Starting to notice a pattern? Anytime you have an emergency involving hazardous materials, always warn others of the danger.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Who do you need to notify when a class 2 (compressed gas) placarded vehicle is involved in an accident?
  • The carrier
  • Poison control
  • The shipper
  • The receiver

Quote From The CDL Manual:

If compressed gas is leaking from your vehicle, warn others of the danger. Only permit those involved in removing the hazard or wreckage to get close. You must notify the shipper if compressed gas is involved in any accident.

Next
During a hazardous materials emergency involving class 1 explosives, you should:
  • Warn others of the danger
  • Do not allow smoking or open fire near the vehicle
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Place the explosives at least 300 feet from the vehicles and occupied buildings.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

If your vehicle has a breakdown or accident while carrying explosives, warn others of the danger. Keep bystanders away. Do not allow smoking or open fire near the vehicle. If there is a fire, warn everyone of the danger of explosion.

Remove all explosives before pulling apart vehicles involved in a collision. Place the explosives at least 300 feet from the vehicles and occupied buildings. Stay a safe distance away.

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