TruckingTruth logo

9.7 Hazardous Materials - Emergencies (continued)

Required Notification

The National Response Center helps coordinate emergency response to chemical hazards. It is a resource to the local police and firefighters. The center maintains a 24-hour, toll-free line. You or your employer must call the center when any of the following occur as a direct result of a hazardous materials incident per 171.15, 171.16:

National Response Center 800-424-8802

  • (a) General. As soon as practical but no later than 12 hours after the occurrence of any incident described in paragraph (b) of this section, each person in physical possession of the hazardous material must provide notice by telephone to the National Response Center (NRC) on 800-424-8802 (toll free) or 202-267-2675 (toll call). Notice involving an infectious substance (etiologic agent) may be given to the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, GA, 800-232-0124 (toll free), in place of notice to the NRC. Each notice must include the following information:
    • (a)(1) Name of reporter;
    • (a)(2) Name and address of person represented by reporter;
    • (a)(3) Phone number where reporter can be contacted;
    • (a)(4) Date, time, and location of incident;
    • (a)(5) The extent of injury, if any;
    • (a)(6) Class or division, proper shipping name, and quantity of hazardous materials involved, if such information is available; and
    • (a)(7) Type of incident and nature of hazardous material involvement and whether a continuing danger to life exists at the scene.
  • (b) Reportable incident. A telephone report is required whenever any of the following occurs during the course of transportation in commerce (including loading, unloading, and temporary storage):
    • (b)(1) As a direct result of a hazardous material;
    • (b)(1)(i) A person is killed;
    • (b)(1)(ii) A person receives an injury requiring admittance to a hospital;
    • (b)(1)(iii) The general public is evacuated for one hour or more;
    • (b)(1)(iv) A major transportation artery or facility is closed or shut down for one hour or more; or
    • (b)(1)(v) The operational flight pattern or routine of an aircraft is altered;
    • (b)(2) Fire, breakage, spillage, or suspected radioactive contamination occurs involving a radioactive material;
    • (b)(3) Fire, breakage, spillage, or suspected contamination occurs involving an infectious substance other than a diagnostic specimen or regulated medical waste;
    • (b)(4) A release of a marine pollutant occurs in a quantity exceeding 450 L (119 gallons) for a liquid or 400 kg (882) pounds) for a solid; of
    • (b)(5) A situation exists of such a nature (e.g., a continuing danger to life exists at the scene of the incident) that, in the judgment of the person in possession of the hazardous material, it should be reported to the NRC even though it does not meet the criteria of paragraph (b)(1), (2), (3) or (4) of this section.

Persons telephoning the National Response Center should be ready to give:

  • Their name.
  • Name and address of the carrier they work for.
  • Phone number where they can be reached.
  • Date, time and location of incident.
  • The extent of injuries, if any.
  • Classification, name and quantity of hazardous materials involved, if such information is available.
  • Type of incident and nature of hazardous material involvement and whether a continuing danger to life exists at the scene.

If a reportable quantity of hazardous substance was involved, the caller should give the name of the shipper and the quantity of the hazardous substance discharged.

Be prepared to give your employer the required information as well. Carriers must make detailed written reports within 30 days of an incident.

The Chemical Transportation Emergency Center (CHEMTREC) in Washington, D.C., also has a 24-hour, toll-free line. CHEMTREC was created to provide emergency personnel with technical information about the physical properties of hazardous materials. The National Response Center and CHEMTREC are in close communication. If you call either one, they will tell the other about the problem when appropriate.

CHEMTREC 800-424-9300

Chemtrec is a pay service. If the shipper is not registered with Chemtrec, Chemtrec will NOT have the emergency information on the shipper. In Canada, Chemtrec is a government service.

Emergency Response Telephone Number

Except as provided in 172.604(c), a shipping paper must contain an emergency response telephone number and, if utilizing an emergency response information telephone number service provider, identify the person (by name or contact number) who has a contractual agreement with the service provider, as prescribed in subpart G of this part.

Test Your Knowledge

  • When should a driver check the tires?
  • What is a safe haven?
  • How close to the traveled part of the roadway can you park with Division 1.2 or 1.3?
  • What type of fire extinguisher must placarded vehicles carry?
  • You are hauling 100 pounds of Division 4.3 (dangerous when wet) material. Do you need to stop before railroad crossings?
  • At a rest area you discover your hazardous materials shipments slowly leaking from the vehicle. There is no phone around. What should you do?
  • What is the Emergency Response Guide?

Study sections 9.6 and 9.7 if you can't answer all of these questions.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Review Questions - Click On The Picture To Begin...

Who can help coordinate emergency response to chemical hazards?
  • Poison Control
  • National Response Center
  • CHEMTREC
  • Federal HAZMAT Response Corp.

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The National Response Center helps coordinate emergency response to chemical hazards. It is a resource to the local police and firefighters. The center maintains a 24-hour, toll-free line. You or your employer must call the center when any of the following occur as a direct result of a hazardous materials incident per 171.15, 171.16:

Next
An incident involving hazardous materials must be documented in a detailed report within how many days of the incident?
  • 60 days
  • 14 days
  • 7 days
  • 30 days

Quote From The CDL Manual:

Carriers must make detailed written reports within 30 days of an incident.

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[2,4]
2

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More