Profile For dirtydeeds

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    1 year, 2 months ago

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Posted:  6 months, 2 weeks ago

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Sleeper AC without key?

So I still haven’t figured out how to turn the AC on in the sleeper. If I idle the truck it automatically turns off after 10-ish minutes. Leaving it in accessory mode only turns on the fan, which hardly blows any air even on max settings.

Any other ideas? 😓

Posted:  6 months, 3 weeks ago

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Sleeper AC without key?

The only stupid question is the unasked one 😉

In my Freightliner, I either have to have it in accessory to run the heater or the AC or have it idling. The Espar is just the heater, it's not an APU and the truck is turned off to run that.

Laura

I just realized in accessory mode it only blows the fan. Which works for now. Guess I have to turn the truck on and leave it idle for the AC to kick on. Thanks.

Posted:  6 months, 3 weeks ago

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Sleeper AC without key?

Hello. Stupid question: Is it possible to run the AC in the sleeper without the key in the ignition? The AC turns on if I turn the truck on or leave it in accessory mode but I don’t wanna kill the battery. I also don’t want to use unnecessary amounts of gas if I leave the truck on. In my old truck I just turned the APU on and I was set. I don’t see an APU inside this truck. Im driving an international with an Espar heater, if that helps.

Posted:  7 months ago

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First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

Hey guys! Just checking back in to tell you that you were right! Called Western Express first thing in the morning and told them my situation. They were able to work it out and get me in as quick as possible. I leave tomorrow for orientation!

Posted:  7 months ago

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First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

double-quotes-start.png

We can tell you this...

If there was no ticket and no damage, then there was no accident.

But, wait a minute...

It sounds like your employer was being very kind to you to ask you to resign. What we don't know is if they are putting this information on your DAC report, If they do then you have an accident you need to discuss with your next employer.

Here's my advice: You are going to have to explain why you left your first company. I guess you could tell them you got scared on your first load, panicked and decided to quit. I don't know, maybe you can come up with something better. If you tell them the absolute truth you are probably not going to get hired. Just the fact that you resigned on your first load will scare a lot of them away. I don't think your first employer is intending on putting this on your DAC. I just don't know why they would tell you to resign and then do that to you. There is no way for me to know what they intend.

Give that a try and see what happens.

You learned one valuable lesson that I hope you will never forget. Set your brakes when you exit the tractor!

double-quotes-end.png

One piece of information that you are forgetting...

Insurance.

If there was an insurance claim then there WAS an accident.

I kinda realized this a little later. You’re right. The paper trail would be in the insurance. Guess I’ll just keep making phone calls and see what comes up. Thanks!

Posted:  7 months ago

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First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

I was in a similar situation. Your career is absolutely not killed. Your options have narrowed down, but still there are plenty of them. Western Express is a good one, give it a try. I would suggest to be honest and tell your recruiter the whole truth. They have enough ways to find it out, so why take the risk of being a liar?

Thanks for the information! Many of you guys keep saying to go with Western Express so I’ll just go ahead and give it a shot. I’ll tell them everything and see how it goes. I appreciate the help so far! Wish me luck!

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

Hello DirtyDeeds,

Very sad to hear of your experience. The first solo load is tough. I think of all the times I narrowly avoided disaster in my first loads. I’d say many others here could relate their close calls, perhaps only luck stood between them and losing their job.

All I know to say is that you seem to be a standup guy, so don’t give up. You may have to get another job to make ends meet until you get things sorted out. Hopefully, others here will be able to offer you encouragement.

Thank you! I appreciate the positive words! I’m trying to keep my head on straight! Lol

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

We can tell you this...

If there was no ticket and no damage, then there was no accident.

But, wait a minute...

It sounds like your employer was being very kind to you to ask you to resign. What we don't know is if they are putting this information on your DAC report, If they do then you have an accident you need to discuss with your next employer.

Here's my advice: You are going to have to explain why you left your first company. I guess you could tell them you got scared on your first load, panicked and decided to quit. I don't know, maybe you can come up with something better. If you tell them the absolute truth you are probably not going to get hired. Just the fact that you resigned on your first load will scare a lot of them away. I don't think your first employer is intending on putting this on your DAC. I just don't know why they would tell you to resign and then do that to you. There is no way for me to know what they intend.

Give that a try and see what happens.

You learned one valuable lesson that I hope you will never forget. Set your brakes when you exit the tractor!

Hey, Old School! So, unfortunately there was some damage. I forgot to write that down. The trailer somehow swung out of the way and didn’t hit anything but the metal piece that holds the mudflap up on the back of the tractor did some damage. 4 parked cars. Luckily no one was inside them. 1 of those cars was only a scratch and a small dent, the other 1 had a decent sized dent on the side, the last two were crushed and done for.

Also, I did ask Swift to see if any accident shows up and all they said was that my previous employer only put that I resigned. They said it was on a “dashboard” or something. I’m guessing that’s what the DAC you guys are talking about is?

Also, I would love to try Western Express or CR England, but i’m afraid that once I fly out to orientation then they’ll find out about the accident and then i’d have to be sent home.

I’ve got the resignation excuse already figured out, and i’ve been helping out a buddy of mine with his moving company driving a straight truck whenever he needs help. I can assure you that I have not forgotten the emergency knob again! That thing gives me PTSD flashbacks every time I look at it.

So if it’s not on the DAC then i’m good?

Posted:  7 months ago

View Topic:

First Load went terribly wrong! Please Help!

Hello, So I’ve been hesitant to make a post about this because It’s embarrassing and I don’t need to leave here feeling worse than I already do about it. But, I’m desperate, so here goes nothing.

I got my CDL earlier this year, did my training with a trainer, and finally got into my own truck. On that day I got my first load, and I also had my first big accident. It wasn’t a driving accident. It was a rollaway. I got out to get the bills of lading paperwork and forgot to set the emergency brake. I know, dangerous. (First load jitters, probably.) Luckily for me no one got hurt, and the police never gave me a ticket. I DID lose my job though, but I was asked to resign so that I “could find another job” instead of being terminated. And I signed the paperwork because that sounded good to me at the time, not realizing that this accident pretty much killed my career, and I didn’t even start it yet. Needless to say, no one wants to give me a job offer (except for 1 company. They saw the accident as a fluke and managed to talk their safety team into giving me a shot. But they’re a flatbed company and i’m terrified of heights). Now that you know the backstory, here’s where I hope I can find someone that can help me answer a question, or at least point me in the right direction for a job. I recently went to the DMV, months after the accident, and requested my driver’s abstract including all my records, and it shows up clean. No accident. Nothing. Now, I know I have to tell any company the truth about any accidents, I don’t want to be a liar, but Swift told me that no one has claimed the accident yet (but couldn’t hire me because I already admitted to it.) and my driving record shows that it’s clean.

Is it possible that It won’t show up if I tell another company that I’m clean? The police did take my license and name down though. That’s why I’m confused as to why it’s not showing up on my record. I just want to figure this out before I admit it to anyone else. I’m desperate, jobless, broke. I need a way to get my foot back in the door. I just got my CDL and didn’t even start my career yet. Please help.

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

I guess no one got what I was trying to say lol. And people saying solid green lights in left turn only lanes exist in NJ... well NOW I know. And they must be in the more country/town areas of NJ, Because in MY little city there isn’t one like that. We hardly have left turn lanes compared to what i’m seeing out here. Hell, even 30-40 minutes away from where I live the roads look different to me. Of course all the laws are the same in every state and city, No one was arguing that. I’m just saying that i’ve never seen a solid green light directing traffic in a left turn only lane. It always had a left arrow. That’s all. Jeez. Lol. It confused me, I brain farted, I failed. Good news is.. today I took my road test again and used this new knowledge to pass my exam. Only got 4 points out of 30. See you guys out there!

Posted:  1 year ago

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How does per diem work at Prime INC?

I recently finished my TNT phase at Prime INC and I'm trying to make a budget for when I'm on the road. My trainer told me he would hire me to drive his truck that's in the Prime fleet. I was told that Prime has per diem for their company drivers and was wondering if I would still be getting per diem if I'm being payed by my trainer. From what I understood, I still get access to the benefits offered to Prime company drivers (I think), but would be receiving my pay from my trainer. Does that mean I don't get it since I'm technically being payed by someone else? Thanks in advance for the help.

This sounds super shady to me. What exactly did he tell you?

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

I'm from Mississippi. I taught Step Van driving in Fairfield, NJ for several months in the fall last year. I did not notice anything unusual with the lights around Essex County.

Your description seems to describe a comon situation: the usual red/yellow/green light is hanging in the center of the road, but with an added single green left turn arrow. These usually have a sign that says "LEFT TURN YIELD ON GREEN". This means when the main green light is on, anyone going in that direction may enter the intersection and go straight or turn left as it is safe to do so. As long as the green arrow is also on, left turns are protected, no yield is needed. But the when the green left arrow goes out (there's a short waiting period) the oncoming traffic gets the green and can enter the intersection at the same time, even if there's a left turn pocket for you. Left turners may then enter the intersecton, but just as in an intersection without a left turn light, the left turn people may turn left only when it is safe.

Fairfield is more like a town. Lots of land. Less traffic. But, You’re right you will occasionally see the “yield for green light” as a tiny sign hanging by the green lights directing normal lanes in some towns. Where i’m from there rarely is a left turn lane. Most of the time we just pull out and wait for our light to turn red to turn safely because that’s the only time when oncoming traffic is stopped. And it’s allowed. Everybody behind us has to go around us. When we DO see a left turn lane, it’s only used in intersections with constant heavy traffic. And the only time we can turn in that left turn lane is when we have a green arrow because the oncoming traffic light is red. So, in my head, every time there’s a left turn lane I don’t have to worry about yielding because the traffic lights will direct us when to go. Hence the green arrows. My problem was, i’ve never seen a solid green light + left turn lane combo before. It might sound stupid to you guys because here in missouri they have left turn lanes in pretty much every intersection (at least that’s what it feels like to me) and some of them don’t have green arrows, just solids. It just happened to throw me off.

All i’m saying is, If i’m making a left turn in a left turn ONLY lane, I’m use to not worrying about oncoming traffic because that’s just how it is where I live. Oncoming traffic is always stopped when making a left in a left turn only land. That’s all i’m saying. Lol.

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

I live right over the Philly bridges in PA and have spent a lot time on Jersey roads. New Jersey is an odd state in regards to turning procedures. In Jersey most left turns have to made by jug handles. The small percentage of lefts allowed at intersections all have specific lanes with arrow lights. That’s definitely what threw him off

The left turn scenario he encountered today is definitely far more common in most states based on my travels in various parts of the country.

You’re probably thinking about southern jersey when you talk about the jugs. I’ve lived there when I was in my teens. Been across the bridge and into philly many times lol. Drove to philly a few times, felt lost there as well haha. Most of my driving experience comes from central jersey in the cities. And you’re right, we barely have any light arrows to begin with. We mostly have solid lights that we would have to pull out to make a left and wait for the light to turn red before we finish the turn safely. Traffic behind us has to go around us to get through. When there IS a light arrow + floor arrow, it’s rarely used and ONLY in intersections that have constant heavy traffic. I’ve never really been anywhere else so 🤷🏻‍♂️

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

Now I'm curious what state does one have the right away to turn left on a solid green light, with out yielding to on coming traffic.?

I mean, you’re right. You should yield to oncoming traffic during a solid green, it’s the arrow on the floor that threw me off. Where i’m from it’s always accompanied by a light with arrows, no solids. That’s what threw me off. Thinking about it now, I don’t know why I just didn’t think “duh, i’m supposed to yield at solid greens, I do it all the time back at home.” It was just the floor arrow that made me think otherwise. I’m sure it sounds stupid to a lot of you, but it did. Never seen the solid green + floor arrow combo before.

Driving around missouri makes me feel like i’ve never driven a vehicle before and I hate it. I know it’s not the state’s fault, I just need to rewire the way I drive when I’m not in jersey.

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

I think it was solid green, not an arrow. If it was an arrow, then I have no idea what he's talking about.

You’re right, it was a solid green, BUT it was accompanied by a left arrow on the floor in my lane. Where I come from, a left arrow on the floor is always accompanied by an arrow on the light in front of it. And when the arrow is green the oncoming traffic light is always red. I’ve never seen a solid green with floor arrow combo in my life, so when I got to the intersection during the test I DID stop, saw the solid green, went again, stopped again, panicked, muscle memory kicked in hard and hit the gas pedal one last time and then stopped again. My brain was associating the solid green with just going and seeing the left arrow on the ground made me think the oncoming lane was red. I was VERY confused. By the time I stopped the last time it was already too late. The truck was pushed out enough for me to fail. I apologized to my examiner for the dangerous situation I put us in and explained that i’ve never seen that type of light/intersection situation in my life. He was understanding and basically said that these kind of things change everywhere you go so I always gotta pay attention.

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

As for that left turn, that's your fault. There is no "used to" out here. I never turn on red and I pay attention to every sign and light.

When in doubt, don't do it. If you're not sure if you can turn on red don't turn. If a road looks sketchy don't get on it. If you're not sure you'll fit, stop.

Simple solutions for simple problems.

Turning left on red is not even legal.

Luckily, my light was green, I was just confused as to why the oncoming traffic was also green. Usually if there’s a specific lane ONLY for left turns, the light for that lane should turn green only when the oncoming traffic’s light is red making it safe for me turn left without having to check/yield for oncoming traffic, at least that’s what i’m used to. This light didn’t work like that so it quickly became a very confusing situation for me until my muscle memory kicked in and made me hit the gas pedal at the wrong time.

I’m a little upset about it but I know I can pass the test. Just gotta make some adjustments and keep at it.

Posted:  1 year ago

View Topic:

Different states with different driving cultures.

So, I’m from the city on the east coast and i’m having a hard time grasping the differences in speed limits in certain areas as well as the different things to look out for on intersections. I just failed the road test here in missouri because I failed to yield on green when making a left turn. I’m use to having the green light to turn left while the oncoming traffic has red especially when the lane i’m in is specifically for making a left. It has the arrow and everything. It threw me off big time. Also, why is it 40mph in a small town with lights every block. I’m scared to go more than 30 in an area like this while everyone is flying by me. By the time I get to the next light i’m slamming on the brakes. Changing lanes seem difficult cause i’m not going as fast as the traffic too. I know I just gotta get used to it but it’s really starting to bug me and it keeps throwing me off. I’ve practiced and practiced and practiced while I had my trainer yelling at me because I can’t shake off my muscle memory from driving my car around in jersey. I’m a very defensive driver while I feel like people are more aggressive here because of the lesser population. Idk man. It’s just weird to me. I know i’m gonna be running into this situation more and more as a rookie otr driver once I start hitting the road. Does anyone have tips on getting the hang of a new place quick? I wanna be able to be as safe as possible when driving in a new town/city for the first time and even after that.

Posted:  1 year, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Any Hispanic/Latino OTR truck drivers out here?

This job takes you all over the country. One thing you can count on is that you are going to find some rude people (other drivers, pedestrians, customers) wherever you go. Luckily, on the whole, rude people are in the minority.

I am a white man. I've had other drivers cut me off in fuel lanes, blow their horns, make rude gestures and direct dirty looks at me. Ive had customers ignore me and talk to me like I was an idiot or like I wasn't worthy of their respect. I chalk it up to them being a**holes. Plain and simple. If I was a minority I might think the reason for their rude behavior towards me was based on my race. That would be totally understandable. When someone disrespects you, it's only natural that you want to find a reason for it.

Don't let the a**holes bring you down. You/we are better than them. They can't determine your success or take away your dignity.

That’s good to know. I’m not really good in social environments and freeze up when there’s a rude confrontation. I guess I can just mind my own business and keep walking. Thanks everyone for all the great advice!

Posted:  1 year, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Any Hispanic/Latino OTR truck drivers out here?

My circle has been Ohio, Massachusetts, Delaware/Maryland, Virginia.

That's as far as work has taken me. My experience has been that truckers will help truckers. There are some that won't and that's ok. Nobody is obligated to help, but for the most part they will.

Since we're from the same place, I think I understand where your head is. NY, for as big and diverse as it is, is very close minded. Everybody thinks the same. You don't realize that people are different until you leave there. I look Hispanic and if I let my facial hair grow out I look Arabic.

When I left, I expected everyone to treat me differently based on the color of my skin and my features. The truth is, I was the one acting funny and projecting negativity. I was defensive, waiting for an attack that never came.

Growing up, I was taught that white people were privileged and that I would spend my life in the slums. The hardest thing I've ever had to overcome is that thinking. It sounds like you're still suffering from it.

The truth is, the country isn't racist. Are there racist people out there? Sure, but people are allowed to believe what they want and feel how they want. As long as it doesn't infringe on my freedom, I'm fine with it.

You'll find that shippers, receivers, truckers and people in general judge you by your attitude, your work ethic and sometimes by the name on the side of the trailer. All you can do is your best. Do the best you can with what you got.

This is some really great advice! Thank you! I’m not gonna let my dreams die from the fear i’ve been taught. This is an anazing community. I can’t wait to get out on the road! :)

Posted:  1 year, 1 month ago

View Topic:

Any Hispanic/Latino OTR truck drivers out here?

I appreciate all the encouraging words you guys are giving. It definitely makes me feel a lot better. I’ve only ever been in the NJ/NY area and Orland, Florida. Traveling to the mid-west just gave me a bad taste in my mouth that’s all. I might be a little paranoid, I have a hard time trusting people to begin with. I’ll try and keep an open and positive mind. Can’t wait to see all the cool people at the truck stops once I get out on the road!

Are you bi lingual? CFI has many hispanic drivers. We also do tons of shipping across our Southern boarder. We have a terminal in Laredo and drop yards from Texas to California along the boarder. Being able to speak Spanish is a plus down here.

Truck drivers come from all backgrounds. Be a safe professional driver and you will be respected.

Good luck and relax and smile.

I’m sort of Bi-lingual. I know more english than I do spanish. I was born in America and if you heard me talk you wouldn’t even think I was hispanic. At least that’s what i’ve been told.

I'm hispanic. My mom is Puerto Rican and dad is Dominican. I grew up in Brooklyn, which is like the melting pot of the world. I don't drive OTR, I drive on the bright side in a day cab, but I had similar experiences when I moved to the mountains in Pennsylvania.

It bothered me for about 2 minutes, then I didn't think anything of it. The opinions of those that don't matter, don't matter.

It's just a matter of becoming acclimated. It was obvious I was from Brooklyn by the way I spoke and dressed. The car was also a dead giveaway. Infinitin with 20 inch chrome wheels, blacked out windows and a stereon system causing earthquakes.

Now, I give people with NY/NJ license plates dirty looks rofl-2.gif rofl-3.gif I dress and act like I'm from the mountains in Pennsylvania. It's just a matter of being comfortable in your skin. Once, you are you'll be fine.

Another thing is, listening to the media and all that other nonsense I had a preconceived notion that everybody is racist. I treated people like they were racist and you get the energy you give.

5 months in, your mind is still racing and overthinking. Once everything is second nature, you'll be fine.

I come from a place close to where you’re from so this definitely made me feel better, thanks. I’ll keep going.

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