Sleeper AC Without Key?

Topic 31023 | Page 1

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dirtydeeds's Comment
member avatar

Hello. Stupid question: Is it possible to run the AC in the sleeper without the key in the ignition? The AC turns on if I turn the truck on or leave it in accessory mode but I donโ€™t wanna kill the battery. I also donโ€™t want to use unnecessary amounts of gas if I leave the truck on. In my old truck I just turned the APU on and I was set. I donโ€™t see an APU inside this truck. Im driving an international with an Espar heater, if that helps.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

The only stupid question is the unasked one ๐Ÿ˜‰

In my Freightliner, I either have to have it in accessory to run the heater or the AC or have it idling. The Espar is just the heater, it's not an APU and the truck is turned off to run that.

Laura

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

dirtydeeds's Comment
member avatar

The only stupid question is the unasked one ๐Ÿ˜‰

In my Freightliner, I either have to have it in accessory to run the heater or the AC or have it idling. The Espar is just the heater, it's not an APU and the truck is turned off to run that.

Laura

I just realized in accessory mode it only blows the fan. Which works for now. Guess I have to turn the truck on and leave it idle for the AC to kick on. Thanks.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The only stupid question is the unasked one ๐Ÿ˜‰

In my Freightliner, I either have to have it in accessory to run the heater or the AC or have it idling. The Espar is just the heater, it's not an APU and the truck is turned off to run that.

Laura

double-quotes-end.png

I just realized in accessory mode it only blows the fan. Which works for now. Guess I have to turn the truck on and leave it idle for the AC to kick on. Thanks.

I was gonna mention that. Without an Apu/Epu the truck must idle. The bunk heater should be diesel powered so no key on for it. Generally turning the key on will turn the bunk heater off. Running the fans with the key in accessories will drain the batteries quick.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Older ignition locks allow to pull the key out if that's the question. What is the advantage though? Fuel is cheap, you will hardly use more than 3-4 gallons per night. I don't know about Internationals, but in FL and Volvo you can use cruise control to slightly move your RPMs up so the engine doesn't die.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Older ignition locks allow to pull the key out if that's the question. What is the advantage though? Fuel is cheap, you will hardly use more than 3-4 gallons per night. I don't know about Internationals, but in FL and Volvo you can use cruise control to slightly move your RPMs up so the engine doesn't die.

*Correction: Fuel is cheap...when someone else is paying for it. ๐Ÿ˜

If you idle for a full 10 hour break you'll burn between 5-10 gallons depending on your engine and settings. Thats $18-$40 in diesel at today's prices, plus DEF costs. PER DAY. Do that 7 days a week and you're looking at substantial fuel costs. Again, cheap if someone else is paying for your fuel, expensive as hell if you are paying for it.

Ryan K.'s Comment
member avatar

I have also thought about this for a different reason. Say you done your shift and your done driving for the night and parked ready to sleep and won't be driving for the next 10-12 hours. You want to have a few cold ones before passing out and sleeping in your cab. The laws for DUI are that if the key is in the ignition then you are in operation of a vehicle, even if the engines off and your just running the AC. So being able to run stuff without key in the ignition before sleep could mean the difference between qualifying for a DUI and not qualifying or breaking the DUI laws.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I have also thought about this for a different reason. Say you done your shift and your done driving for the night and parked ready to sleep and won't be driving for the next 10-12 hours. You want to have a few cold ones before passing out and sleeping in your cab. The laws for DUI are that if the key is in the ignition then you are in operation of a vehicle, even if the engines off and your just running the AC. So being able to run stuff without key in the ignition before sleep could mean the difference between qualifying for a DUI and not qualifying or breaking the DUI laws.

Drinking while out on the road, under dispatch or not is a surefire way to get fired real quick. Save the alcohol for hometime.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

The laws for DUI are that if the key is in the ignition then you are in operation of a vehicle

The very term DUI has "driving" in it, so if your truck is parked with parking brake set, it is not driven, and DUI doesn't apply. Any first year law student will destroy this case in any court.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The laws for DUI are that if the key is in the ignition then you are in operation of a vehicle

double-quotes-end.png

The very term DUI has "driving" in it, so if your truck is parked with parking brake set, it is not driven, and DUI doesn't apply. Any first year law student will destroy this case in any court.

Interesting, because knowledge of others decisions and a 5 second Google search proves otherwise. If you have the key in the ignition, or even have it in your pocket you can be charged and convicted. By having the key you're determined to be in control of that vehicle.. The likelihood to be terminated by your employer because someone sends them pictures of you walking to your truck (or finding empties/odor during repair work) is much higher than catching a DUI if you're passed out in the sleeper.

Alcohol is best to stay away from while on the road. Save it for when you're home. Most companies have a zero tolerance and will terminate you immediately if they know. With everyone snapping pics and videos trying to get likes on social media you're bound to get caught. Especially if you work for a mega carrier as they generate more attention when they do something stupid than a small trucking outfit does. Keep in mind if you have even a trace on alcohol on your breath DOT will put you out of service for 24 hours. DUI is .04 rather than .08. Even as a home daily driver I choose to not drink 24 hours before im set to get back behind the wheel of a truck. Anything drug or alcohol related will severely impact your career as most companies will turn you down, and insurance among other things would destroy you if you tried to buy your own truck.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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