Different States With Different Driving Cultures.

Topic 30118 | Page 1

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dirtydeeds's Comment
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So, I’m from the city on the east coast and i’m having a hard time grasping the differences in speed limits in certain areas as well as the different things to look out for on intersections. I just failed the road test here in missouri because I failed to yield on green when making a left turn. I’m use to having the green light to turn left while the oncoming traffic has red especially when the lane i’m in is specifically for making a left. It has the arrow and everything. It threw me off big time. Also, why is it 40mph in a small town with lights every block. I’m scared to go more than 30 in an area like this while everyone is flying by me. By the time I get to the next light i’m slamming on the brakes. Changing lanes seem difficult cause i’m not going as fast as the traffic too. I know I just gotta get used to it but it’s really starting to bug me and it keeps throwing me off. I’ve practiced and practiced and practiced while I had my trainer yelling at me because I can’t shake off my muscle memory from driving my car around in jersey. I’m a very defensive driver while I feel like people are more aggressive here because of the lesser population. Idk man. It’s just weird to me. I know i’m gonna be running into this situation more and more as a rookie otr driver once I start hitting the road. Does anyone have tips on getting the hang of a new place quick? I wanna be able to be as safe as possible when driving in a new town/city for the first time and even after that.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
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So, I’m from the city on the east coast and i’m having a hard time grasping the differences in speed limits in certain areas as well as the different things to look out for on intersections. I just failed the road test here in missouri because I failed to yield on green when making a left turn. I’m use to having the green light to turn left while the oncoming traffic has red especially when the lane i’m in is specifically for making a left. It has the arrow and everything. It threw me off big time. Also, why is it 40mph in a small town with lights every block. I’m scared to go more than 30 in an area like this while everyone is flying by me. By the time I get to the next light i’m slamming on the brakes. Changing lanes seem difficult cause i’m not going as fast as the traffic too. I know I just gotta get used to it but it’s really starting to bug me and it keeps throwing me off. I’ve practiced and practiced and practiced while I had my trainer yelling at me because I can’t shake off my muscle memory from driving my car around in jersey. I’m a very defensive driver while I feel like people are more aggressive here because of the lesser population. Idk man. It’s just weird to me. I know i’m gonna be running into this situation more and more as a rookie otr driver once I start hitting the road. Does anyone have tips on getting the hang of a new place quick? I wanna be able to be as safe as possible when driving in a new town/city for the first time and even after that.

Howdy, dirtydeeds ~

Kearsey is from Jersey, and SHE went the Sprimo way with Prime....and has at least 5 years in...and trains. I'm sure she went thru similar stuff; it's all about adaptation and acclimation! (When I go back to NY, I don't KNOW how to drive anymore, truly.)

If she doesn't chime in, the vets on TT will; but here's HER take on all that:

Kearsey from Jearsey ... lol~!!

Here in Ohio, we have MANY small maximum 40mph towns, even WITH roundabouts! (MPH usually less there, however.) It's so commonplace, we are just 'used to it.' I'm from NY,raised in Florida, landed in Ohio, so .. i get ya. Sorry.

All the twp's are different, and have scantily clad rules; I hear you. Hopefully, Errol V. will chime in; he's been a trainer/educator, most of his life. I'm sorry, however. Look at Kearsey's stuff; it WILL help. That, and just good ole' ... experience!

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

If 40 MPH is too much for you, do 30. Sure, it won't many you any friends but it's better than not being able to stop in time, getting fines and causing accidents. When I'm driving 4 things determine my speed:

1) how safe is it? (Weather and other conditions)

2) do I feel comfortable?

3) The speed limit. Always 5-10 under.

4) the speed the vehicle is governed to.

As for that left turn, that's your fault. There is no "used to" out here. I never turn on red and I pay attention to every sign and light.

No point in getting used to how they drive in other parts of the country. Maintain your space and pay attention. It's that simple. I've been flipped off plenty of times, it means nothing to me.

When in doubt, don't do it. If you're not sure if you can turn on red don't turn. If a road looks sketchy don't get on it. If you're not sure you'll fit, stop.

Simple solutions for simple problems.

dirtydeeds's Comment
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As for that left turn, that's your fault. There is no "used to" out here. I never turn on red and I pay attention to every sign and light.

When in doubt, don't do it. If you're not sure if you can turn on red don't turn. If a road looks sketchy don't get on it. If you're not sure you'll fit, stop.

Simple solutions for simple problems.

Turning left on red is not even legal.

Luckily, my light was green, I was just confused as to why the oncoming traffic was also green. Usually if there’s a specific lane ONLY for left turns, the light for that lane should turn green only when the oncoming traffic’s light is red making it safe for me turn left without having to check/yield for oncoming traffic, at least that’s what i’m used to. This light didn’t work like that so it quickly became a very confusing situation for me until my muscle memory kicked in and made me hit the gas pedal at the wrong time.

I’m a little upset about it but I know I can pass the test. Just gotta make some adjustments and keep at it.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Turning left on red isn't legal. It's not uncommon for both lights to be green even if there's oncoming traffic. You yield until it's safe for you to go.

There is no "usually", that's what I'm trying to explain to you. Traffic patterns vary drastically from area to area. They'll never be the same.

You have to kick the muscle memory and habits. They don't work in a truck and it can be dangerous. It takes longer for it to move, longer to pick up speed and longer to get the entire vehicle out of the way and longer to stop. For example if I'm making a turn in my car, I just go when I have an opening. Making a turn in my truck, I need there to be no oncoming traffic and I'm checking to make sure that I can get my tail passed the intersection lines. There are more things to be aware of. Once you know what you're looking for, it's not difficult at all.

making it safe for me turn left without having to check/yield for oncoming traffic,

Never do that. I don't care what color the light is, I don't go until I know for certain those cars are stopping. Accidents and Injuries don't care who was at fault and they suck for both sides, especially if you're a CDL holder and in a cmv. A lawyer will do everything possible to make it your fault and get paid.

Don't rely on lights. Lights don't stop cars being driven by people not paying attention.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
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It has the arrow and everything.

A green arrow in either direction gives you the right of way. Opposing traffic would have to yield. However, you'd still have to yield to any traffic remaining in the intersection. So I don't know what happened in your case.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

It has the arrow and everything.

double-quotes-end.png

A green arrow in either direction gives you the right of way. Opposing traffic would have to yield. However, you'd still have to yield to any traffic remaining in the intersection. So I don't know what happened in your case.

It sounds like he was in a turning lane and the light turned green. Based on the light pattern at home he assumed the light turned red for oncoming traffic and it caught him off guard when they didn't stop because their light was also green. I'm guessing he turned and didn't yield to oncoming traffic.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Don't rely on lights. Lights don't stop cars being driven by people not paying attention.

That's a fact. He may have failed you for not exercising caution. Regardless of the right away.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

It has the arrow and everything.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

A green arrow in either direction gives you the right of way. Opposing traffic would have to yield. However, you'd still have to yield to any traffic remaining in the intersection. So I don't know what happened in your case.

double-quotes-end.png

It sounds like he was in a turning lane and the light turned green. Based on the light pattern at home he assumed the light turned red for oncoming traffic and it caught him off guard when they didn't stop because their light was also green. I'm guessing he turned and didn't yield to oncoming traffic.

But if it was a green arrow the opposing light would've have to be red.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I think it was solid green, not an arrow. If it was an arrow, then I have no idea what he's talking about.

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